酷兔英语



Complete List of Stories for Boys by

HERBERT STRANG

ADVENTURES OF DICK TREVANION, THE

ADVENTURES OF HARRY ROCHESTER, THE

A GENTLEMAN-AT-ARMS

A HERO OF LIEGE

A THOUSAND MILES AN HOUR

AIR PATROL, THE

AIR SCOUT, THE

BARCLAY OF THE GUIDES

BLUE RAIDER, THE

BOYS OF THE LIGHT BRIGADE

BRIGHT IDEAS

BURTON OF THE FLYING CORPS

CARRY ON

CRUISE OF THE GYRO-CAR, THE

DAN BOLTON'S DISCOVERY

FIGHTING WITH FRENCH

FLYING BOAT, THE

FRANK FORESTER

HEIR OF A HUNDRED KINGS, THE

HUMPHREY BOLD

JACK BROWN IN CHINA

JACK HARDY

KING OF THE AIR

KOBO

LONG TRAIL, THE

LORD OF THE SEAS

MARTIN OF OLD LONDON

MOTOR SCOUT, THE

NO MAN'S ISLAND

OLD MAN OF THE MOUNTAIN, THE

ONE OF CLIVE'S HEROES

PALM TREE ISLAND

RIDERS, THE

RIVER PIRATES, THE

ROB THE RANGER

ROUND THE WORLD IN SEVEN DAYS

SAMBA

SETTLERS AND SCOUTS

SULTAN JIM

SWIFT AND SURE

THROUGH THE ENEMY'S LINES

TOM BURNABY

TOM WILLOUGHBY'S SCOUTS

TRUE AS STEEL

WINNING HIS NAME

WITH DRAKE ON THE SPANISH MAIN

WITH HAIG ON THE SOMME

YOUNG JACK

[Illustration: HE CLUTCHED AT THE GRAPNEL, LET GO HIS HOLD OF THE MAST,

AND SWUNG CLEAR. Frontispiece--see page 79]

KING OF THE AIR

Or, To Morocco on an Aeroplane

By

HERBERT STRANG

ILLUSTRATED IN COLOUR BY W. E. WEBSTER

HUMPHREY MILFORD

OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS

LONDON, EDINBURGH, GLASGOW

TORONTO, MELBOURNE, CAPE TOWN, BOMBAY

Copyright 1907 by the Bobbs-Merrill Company

in the United States of America.

Published 1907.

Reprinted 1908, 1909, 1911, 1913 (twice), 1915 (twice),

1917, 1918, 1919 (twice), 1920, 1923, 1929

Printed in Great Britain by Richard Clay & Sons, Limited,

Bungay, Suffolk.

CONTENTS

CHAPTER PAGE

I. Mr. Greatorex is Astonished 9

II. Herr Schwab 20

III. Tom makes Experiments 34

IV. A Prisoner in Zemmur 51

V. Off the Barbary Coast 63

VI. Salathiel ben Ezra 81

VII. The Hills of Zemmur 98

VIII. The Swordsmith of Ain Afroo 116

IX. A Bolt from the Blue 133

X. The Kasbah 148

XI. Prison Breakers 167

XII. A Hitch 182

XIII. Diplomacy 196

XIV. The Troglodytes 218

XV. View Halloo! 233

XVI. Icarus 248

XVII. Compliments and Thanks 262

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

"He clutched at the grapnel, let go his hold

of the mast, and swung clear" 79

"His sword flew from his grasp, and he reeled

dizzily to the ground." 130

"Tom, seizing a big stone, threw it with all his

force into the black room beneath" 187

"Abdul bent over the brink and smartly rapped his

knuckles with the butt of Tom's revolver" 222

KING OF THE AIR

CHAPTER I--MR. GREATOREX IS ASTONISHED

Mr. John Greatorex was very wealthy, and very obstinate. He had made a

large fortune as a manufacturer of chemicals, but disclaimed any

knowledge of chemistry. He had dabbled a little in mechanics, and was

convinced that he possessed an accurate practical knowledge of its

applications. Consequently, when his new motor-car arrived, he saw no

necessity to take a chauffeur with him on its trial spin. He was like a

child with a new toy, jealous of participation.

"My dear," said Mrs. Greatorex, as she handed him his motor goggles,

"are you sure you will not take Timothy? What if it breaks down?"

"My _love_," said Mr. Greatorex in his emphatic way, "I do not _want_

Timothy. It will not break down. If it _does_, I flatter myself I am

_competent_ to make any _necessary_ repairs. I shall be back at

seven-thirty--in good time for dinner; and I _hope and trust_ the soup

will _not_ be cold."

He gave a preliminary _honk! honk!_ looking round with a smile that

plainly said, "There! you see that _everything_ is in order!" Then he

steered the car accurately down the drive to the road.

His house lying in the heart of the country, Mr. Greatorex did not fear

to meet milestones in the shape of policemen with stop-watches, who

would take his number and afterwards confront him in court. In a minute

or two the car was whirling along the road at a rate which, it is to be

feared, gravely exceeded the speed limit. All went merry as a

marriage-bell, and Mr. Greatorex was at the height of exhilaration and

satisfaction, when, just as he was mounting the acclivity of Five Oaks

Bridge, without even a click in warning, the machine came to a dead

stop. Mr. Greatorex put the engine out of gear, then tried to start it

by turning the starting handle; but finding this of no avail he clapped

on the brake, skipped out of the car, removed his goggles and his

gloves, and set about making an examination.

On the other side of the bridge, sitting on the bank of the stream, was

a boy, gazing with round eyes at a float that hung from a line attached

to a long home-made rod of yew. He had heard the clatter of the

motor-car as it came along the road; he was aware that the noise had

suddenly ceased; but, being a lad of great concentration, he did not

give a thought to what was happening out of sight at the further end of

the bridge. He had come out for an afternoon's fishing; two or three fat

carp lay beside him on the bank; and noticing at this moment a slight

movement of the float, he was soon oblivious of everything except the

fish on his hook.

Half an hour passed. Three more fish had rewarded his patience; then,

satisfied with his catch, the boy rose, methodically wound up his line,

and, leaving reel, rod and basket on the bank, walked up on to the

bridge, to investigate the meaning of sundry strange noises he had

heard, vaguely, in the intervals between the bites.

As he gained the foot of the bridge, where a motor-car stood somewhat

askew across the road, he caught sight of a pair of brown boots

projecting from beneath the machine. Nothing but the boots was visible;

but they moved, and it was clear that they shod the feet of some living

person, for there came puffs and grunts and explosive monosyllables

resembling those he had sometimes heard on the golf-links near his home.

The boy leant against the parapet, stuck his hands into his pockets, and

watched. By and by there was an ejaculation of peculiar vehemence; the

boots moved out into the road, followed by a pair of grey-trousered

legs, a soiled and rumpled motor-coat, and a very red and dirty face;

the boy took especial note of a black patch in the very centre of a

shiny skull.

Puffing and blowing, Mr. Greatorex crawled from under his new car, and

stood upon his feet--a rather disreputable-looking object--staring

wrathfully at the offending car. He had not perceived the small

spectator.

"Wish I _had_ brought Timothy!" he muttered. "_Confound_ the brute!"

He looked at his grimy hands, at his mud-stained clothes, up the road,

down the road, and finally at the boy, who had at last made an

impression on his retina.

"Hi, boy!" he said.

The boy approached with a shy smile. Mr. Greatorex scowled, conscious of

his plight.

"Boy, tell me, and don't _grin_, is there a smith anywhere in this

neighbourhood?"

"In the village, sure, measter."

"Where is the village?"

"About three miles away, over yonder."

"God bless me! Three miles! Well, look here, boy, I'll give you

_sixpence_ to run there and send the smith back--behind a horse, on a

bicycle, _anyhow_--to mend this confounded machine. I'm twenty miles away

from _home_, you understand, and I shall be _late_ for dinner. I'll make

it a _shilling_ if the smith is here within an hour."

The boy looked up into the wrathful face and smiled again.

"Would 'ee like me to mend un for 'ee? 'Twould maybe save time."

Mr. Greatorex stared.

"_You_ mend it! 'Pon my word!"

And then he burst into a roar of laughter which carried away his

ill-humour, for Mr. Greatorex was normally a very good-tempered person.

The situation was, in truth, amusing. The boy was a little fellow under

four feet high. He had a round chubby face, not free from stains. He

wore corduroy breeches much too large for him, big clumping boots, and a

flannel shirt open at the neck. His blue eyes peeped up from beneath a

large, soft, much-discoloured straw hat. And this little urchin had

actually offered to mend a motor-car with which Mr. Greatorex, with all

his knowledge of mechanism, had been struggling for half an hour in

vain!

Mr. Greatorex laughed again.

"Come, cut along, youngster," he said genially. "Let me see how _fast_

you can run."

"I'll mend un if you give me leave. 'Twill save time," persisted the

boy.

Mr. Greatorex pulled out his watch. What a joke, he thought--this sprat

of a boy offering to tackle his huge motor-car! It was only a little

after five; there might still be time to fetch the smith, get the

repairs made, and yet reach home by half-past seven. A little rest would

not come amiss after his exertions. Why not let the youngster try his

hand--for the fun of it?

"Well then, _fire_ away, my young engineer. I've been at it half an

hour, _confound_ the thing!"

"What have 'ee done, measter?"

"Done? Everything! Examined the sparking plugs: _they're_ all right.

Wires from battery: _they're_ all right. Battery itself, _that's_ all

right. Plenty of petrol in the tank. _Every_thing's all right, hang it,

and yet the thing _won't_ go!"

"Don't you worrit, measter. Give me a lend of your tools."

The boy's cocksureness again amused Mr. Greatorex, who seated himself on

the parapet of the bridge, and mopped his perspiring face, smiling

pleasantly. Though past fifty he was still young at heart, and very

ready to be amused. He took out a pipe, filled and lit it, and puffed

away, with an expression of serenecontentment on his rubicund dirty

face.

The boy flung off his hat and disappeared. Metallic sounds came from the

interior of the car.

"How are you getting on, boy?" asked Mr. Greatorex after some ten

minutes.

There was no answer.

Five minutes passed.

"Find it rather too _much_ for you, eh?" said Mr. Greatorex, looking

more amused than ever.

Still there was no answer.

"Got everything you want?" he asked again.

But the boy made no reply; only the sound of knocking and screwing

continued.

Mr. Greatorex laughed aloud.

"Come," he said, getting up and standing with legs astraddle a foot or

two from the car, "you mustn't make _too_ long a _job_ of it, you know."

Then he chuckled.

Five minutes afterwards the boy crawled out. Mr. Greatorex laughed again

as he surveyed the grimy little fellow. A great patch of black

surrounded one eye, where he had rubbed his knuckles.

"All right now, measter," said the boy.

"What! Come, my lad, you've _had your_ turn; now run along and fetch the

smith."

"Bean't no need. She'll go now."

Mr. Greatorex looked impressed, stepped to the front of the car, and

turned the handle; to his amazement the engines started. He sprang into

the car, threw the engines into gear, and was still more amazed when,

releasing the clutch pedal, he found that the car moved.

"Better take off the brake, measter," said the boy.

"Why, yes, certainly," said Mr. Greatorex, with a preoccupied air, and

the car mounted the incline, spun across the bridge, and ran easily down

the road. Then Mr. Greatorex stopped it and turned round.

"Hi, boy!" he shouted. The boy picked up his hat, stuck it on his head,

and approached.

"Look here, youngster," said Mr. Greatorex, "the car is all _right_!"

"Told 'ee so, measter."


生词表:
  • wealthy [´welθi] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.富有的;丰富的   (初中英语单词)
  • manufacturer [,mænju´fæktʃərə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.制造人;工厂主   (初中英语单词)
  • chemistry [´kemistri] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.化学   (初中英语单词)
  • accurate [´ækjurət] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.准确的;精密的   (初中英语单词)
  • jealous [´dʒeləs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.妒忌的   (初中英语单词)
  • flatter [´flætə] 移动到这儿单词发声  vt.阿谀,奉承;胜过   (初中英语单词)
  • gravely [´greivli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.庄重地,严肃地   (初中英语单词)
  • height [hait] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.高度;顶点;卓越   (初中英语单词)
  • stream [stri:m] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.河 vi.流出;飘扬   (初中英语单词)
  • concentration [,kɔnsən´treiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.集中,专心   (初中英语单词)
  • patience [´peiʃəns] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.忍耐(力);耐心;坚韧   (初中英语单词)
  • peculiar [pi´kju:liə] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.特有的;奇异的   (初中英语单词)
  • conscious [´kɔnʃəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.意识的;自觉的   (初中英语单词)
  • anywhere [´eniweə] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.无论何处;任何地方   (初中英语单词)
  • laughter [´lɑ:ftə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.笑,笑声   (初中英语单词)
  • youngster [´jʌŋstə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.年轻人;小伙子;少年   (初中英语单词)
  • standing [´stændiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.持续 a.直立的   (初中英语单词)
  • amazement [ə´meizmənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.惊愕;惊奇   (初中英语单词)
  • sprang [spræŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  spring 的过去式   (初中英语单词)
  • clutch [klʌtʃ] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.抓住 n.爪子;控制   (初中英语单词)
  • incline [in´klain] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.(使)倾斜 n.斜坡   (初中英语单词)
  • mechanics [mi´kæniks] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.力学;构成法;技巧   (高中英语单词)
  • consequently [´kɔnsikwəntli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.因此,所以   (高中英语单词)
  • preliminary [pri´liminəri] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.初步的 n.预赛   (高中英语单词)
  • confront [kən´frʌnt] 移动到这儿单词发声  vt.(使)面对;正视   (高中英语单词)
  • finding [´faindiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.发现物;判断;结果   (高中英语单词)
  • clatter [´klætə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.&v.喧嚷;骚动   (高中英语单词)
  • investigate [in´vestigeit] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.调查(研究)   (高中英语单词)
  • amusing [ə´mju:ziŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.有趣的   (高中英语单词)
  • offering [´ɔfəriŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.提供;礼物;捐献   (高中英语单词)
  • tackle [´tækəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.用具;装置 vt.处理   (高中英语单词)
  • battery [´bætəri] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.炮兵连;炮台;电池   (高中英语单词)
  • serene [si´ri:n] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.&a.清澈的;宁静的   (高中英语单词)
  • metallic [mi´tælik] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.金属(性)的   (高中英语单词)
  • patrol [pə´trəul] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.巡逻 v.巡逻(查)   (英语四级单词)
  • edinburgh [´edinbərə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.爱丁堡   (英语四级单词)
  • obstinate [´ɔbstinit] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.顽固的;(病)难治的   (英语四级单词)
  • chauffeur [´ʃəufə,ʃeu´fə:] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.(汽车)司机   (英语四级单词)
  • accurately [´ækjuritli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.准确地;精密地   (英语四级单词)
  • warning [´wɔ:niŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.警告;前兆 a.预告的   (英语四级单词)
  • bridge [bridʒ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.桥(梁);鼻梁;桥牌   (英语四级单词)
  • happening [´hæpəniŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.事件,偶然发生的事   (英语四级单词)
  • fishing [´fiʃiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.钓鱼;捕鱼;渔业   (英语四级单词)
  • sundry [´sʌndri] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.各式各样的,各式的   (英语四级单词)
  • vaguely [´veigli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.含糊地,暖昧地   (英语四级单词)
  • explosive [ik´spləusiv] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.易爆炸的 n.炸药   (英语四级单词)
  • breeches [´britʃiz] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.裤子;马裤   (英语四级单词)
  • mechanism [´mekənizəm] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.机械装置;机制   (英语四级单词)
  • contentment [kən´tentmənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.满足;使人满意的事   (英语四级单词)
  • diplomacy [di´pləuməsi] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.外交;交际手腕   (英语六级单词)
  • emphatic [im´fætik] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.强调的;断然的   (英语六级单词)
  • vehemence [´vi:iməns] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.激烈,猛烈;热烈   (英语六级单词)
  • especial [i´speʃəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.特别的,特殊的   (英语六级单词)
  • normally [´nɔ:məli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.正常情况下;通常   (英语六级单词)
  • urchin [´ə:tʃin] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.顽童   (英语六级单词)
  • preoccupied [pri´ɔkjupaid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.被先占的;出神的   (英语六级单词)

  • 上传人 欢乐鱼 分享于 2017-06-26 18:49:10
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