酷兔英语



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MODERN PAINTING

By

GEORGE MOORE

TO SIR WILLIAM EDEN, BART.

OF ALL MY BOOKS, THIS IS THE ONE YOU LIKE BEST; ITS SUBJECT HAS BEEN

THE SUBJECT OF NEARLY ALL OUR CONVERSATIONS IN THE PAST, AND I SUPPOSE

WILL BE THE SUBJECT OF MANY CONVERSATIONS IN THE FUTURE; SO, LOOKING

BACK AND FORWARD, I DEDICATE THIS BOOK TO YOU.

G. M.

_The Editor of "The Speaker" allowed me to publish from time to time

chapters of a book on art. These chapters have been gathered from the

mass of art journalism which had grown about them, and I reprint them

in the sequenceoriginally intended_.

_G. M._

CONTENTS.

WHISTLER

CHAVANNES, MILLET, AND MANET

THE FAILURE OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY

ARTISTIC EDUCATION IN FRANCE AND ENGLAND

INGRES AND COROT

MONET, SISLEY, PISSARO, AND THE DECADENCE

OUR ACADEMICIANS

THE ORGANISATION OF ART

ART AND SCIENCE

ROYALTY IN ART

ART PATRONS

PICTURE DEALERS

MR. BURNE-JONES AND THE ACADEMY

THE ALDERMAN IN ART

RELIGIOSITY IN ART

THE CAMERA IN ART

THE NEW ENGLISH ART CLUB

A GREAT ARTIST

NATIONALITY IN ART

SEX IN ART

MR. STEER'S EXHIBITION

CLAUDE MONET

NOTES--

MR. MARK FISHER

A PORTRAIT BY MR. SARGENT

AN ORCHID BY MR. JAMES

THE WHISTLER ALBUM

INGRES

SOME JAPANESE PRINTS

NEW ART CRITICISM

LONG AGO IN ITALY

WHISTLER.

I have studied Mr. Whistler and thought about him this many a year.

His character was for a long time incomprehensible to me; it contained

elements apparently so antagonistic, so mutually destructive, that I

had to confess my inability to bring him within any imaginable

psychological laws, and classed him as one of the enigmas of life. But

Nature is never illogical; she only seems so, because our sight is not

sufficient to see into her intentions; and with study my psychological

difficulties dwindled, and now the man stands before me exquisitely

understood, a perfect piece of logic. All that seemed discordant and

discrepant in his nature has now become harmonious and inevitable; the

strangest and most erratic actions of his life now seem natural and

consequential (I use the word in its grammatical sense) contradictions

are reconciled, and looking at the man I see the pictures, and looking

at the pictures I see the man.

But at the outset the difficulties were enormous. It was like a

newly-discovered Greek text, without punctuation or capital letters.

Here was a man capable of painting portraits, perhaps not quite so

full of grip as the best work done by Velasquez and Hals, only just

falling short of these masters at the point where they were strongest,

but plainlyexceeding them in graciousness of intention, and subtle

happiness of design, who would lay down his palette and run to a

newspaper office to polish the tail of an epigram which he was

launching against an unfortunatecritic who had failed to distinguish

between an etching and a pen-and-ink drawing! Here was a man who,

though he had spent the afternoon painting like the greatest, would

spend his evenings in frantic disputes over dinner-tables about the

ultimate ownership of a mild joke, possibly good enough for _Punch_,

something that any one might have said, and that most of us having

said it would have forgotten! It will be conceded that such

divagations are difficult to reconcile with the possession of artistic

faculties of the highest order.

The "Ten o'clock" contained a good deal of brilliant writing,

sparkling and audacious epigram, but amid all its glitter and "go"

there are statements which, coming from Mr. Whistler, are as

astonishing as a denial of the rotundity of the earth would be in a

pamphlet bearing the name of Professor Huxley. Mr. Whistler is only

serious in his art--a grave fault according to academicians, who are

serious in everything except their "art". A very boyishutterance is

the statement that such a thing as an artistic period has never been

known.

One rubbed one's eyes; one said, Is this a joke, and, if so, where is

the point of it? And then, as if not content with so much mystification,

Mr. Whistler assured his ten o'clock audience that there was no such

thing as nationality in art, and that you might as well speak of

English mathematics as of English art. We do not stop to inquire if

such answers contain one grain of truth; we know they do not--we stop

to consider them because we know that the criticism of a creative artist

never amounts to more than an ingenious defence of his own work--an

ingenious exaltation of a weakness (a weakness which perhaps none

suspects but himself) into a conspicuous merit.

Mr. Whistler has shared his life equally between America, France, and

England. He is the one solitary example of cosmopolitanism in art, for

there is nothing in his pictures to show that they come from the

north, the south, the east, or the west. They are compounds of all

that is great in Eastern and Western culture. Conscious of this, and

fearing that it might be used as an argument against his art, Mr.

Whistler threw over the entire history, not only of art, but of the

world; and declared boldly that art was, like science, not national,

but essentially cosmopolitan; and then, becoming aware of the anomaly

of his genius in his generation, Mr. Whistler undertook to explain

away the anomaly by ignoring the fifth century B.C. in Athens, the

fifteenth century in Italy, and the seventeenth in Holland, and humbly

submitting that artists never appeared in numbers like swallows, but

singly like aerolites. Now our task is not to disprove these

statements, but to work out the relationship between the author of the

"Butterfly Letters" and the painter of the portrait of "The Mother",

"Lady Archibald Campbell", "Miss Alexander", and the other forty-one

masterpieces that were on exhibition in the Goupil galleries.

There is, however, an intermediate step, which is to point out the

intimate relationship between the letter-writer and the physical man.

Although there is no internal evidence to show that the pictures were

not painted by a Frenchman, an Italian, an Englishman, or a

Westernised Japanese, it would be impossible to read any one of the

butterfly-signed letters without feeling that the author was a man of

nerves rather than a man of muscle, and, while reading, we should

involuntarily picture him short and thin rather than tall and

stalwart. But what has physical condition got to do with painting? A

great deal. The greatest painters, I mean the very greatest--Michael

Angelo, Velasquez, and Rubens--were gifted by Nature with as full a

measure of health as of genius. Their physical constitutions resembled

more those of bulls than of men. Michael Angelo lay on his back for

three years painting the Sistine Chapel. Rubens painted a life-size

figure in a morning of pleasant work, and went out to ride in the

afternoon. But Nature has dowered Mr. Whistler with only genius. His

artistic perceptions are moreexquisite than Velasquez's. He knows as

much, possibly even a little more, and yet the result is never quite

equal. Why? A question of health. _C'est un temperament de chatte_. He

cannot pass from masterpiece to masterpiece like Velasquez. The

expenditure of nerve-force necessary to produce such a work as the

portrait of Lady Archibald Campbell or Miss Alexander exhausts him,

and he is obliged to wait till Nature recoups herself; and these

necessary intervals he has employed in writing letters signed

"Butterfly" to the papers, quarrelling with Oscar over a few mild

jokes, explaining his artistic existence, at the expense of the entire

artistic history of the world, collecting and classifying the

stupidities of the daily and weekly press.

But the lesser side of a man of genius is instructive to study--indeed,

it is necessary that we should study it if we would thoroughly

understand his genius. "No man," it has been very falsely said, "is a

hero to his _valet de chambre_." The very opposite is the truth. Man

will bow the knee only to his own image and likeness. The deeper the

humanity, the deeper the adoration; and from this law not even divinity

is excepted. All we adore is human, and through knowledge of the flesh

that grovels we may catch sight of the soul ascending towards the

divine stars.

And so the contemplation of Mr. Whistler, the author of the "Butterfly

Letters", the defender of his little jokes against the plagiarising

tongue, should stimulate rather than interrupt our prostrations. I

said that Nature had dowered Mr. Whistler with every gift except that

of physical strength. If Mr. Whistler had the bull-like health of

Michael Angelo, Rubens, and Hals, the Letters would never have been

written. They were the safety-valve by which his strained nerves found

relief from the intolerabletension of the masterpiece. He has not the

bodily strength to pass from masterpiece to masterpiece, as did the

great ones of old time. In the completed picture slight traces of his

agony remain. But painting is the most indiscreet of all the arts, and

here and there an omission or a feebleindication reveal the painter

to us in moments of exasperated impotence. To understand Mr.

Whistler's art you must understand his body. I do not mean that Mr.

Whistler has suffered from bad health--his health has always been

excellent; all great artists have excellent health, but his

constitution is more nervous than robust. He is even a strong man, but

he is lacking in weight. Were he six inches taller, and his bulk

proportionately increased, his art would be different. Instead of

having painted a dozen portraits, every one--even the mother and Miss

Alexander, which I personally take to be the two best--a little

febrile in its extreme beauty, whilst some, masterpieces though they

be, are clearly touched with weakness, and marked with hysteria--Mr.

Whistler would have painted a hundred portraits, as strong, as

vigorous, as decisive, and as easily accomplished as any by Velasquez

or Hals. But if Nature had willed him so, I do not think we should

have had the Nocturnes, which are clearly the outcome of a

highly-strung, bloodless nature whetted on the whetstone of its own

weakness to an exasperated sense of volatile colour and evanescent

light. It is hardly possible to doubt that this is so when we look on

these canvases, where, in all the stages of her repose, the night

dozes and dreams upon our river--a creole in Nocturne 34, upon whose

trembling eyelids the lustral moon is shining; a quadroon in Nocturne

17, who turns herself out of the light anhungered and set upon some

feast of dark slumber. And for the sake of these gem-like pictures,

whose blue serenities are comparable to the white perfections of

Athenian marbles, we should have done well to yield a littlestrength

in portraiture, if the distribution of Mr. Whistler's genius had been

left in our hands. So Nature has done her work well, and we have no

cause to regret the few pounds of flesh that she withheld. A few

pounds more of flesh and muscle, and we should have had another

Velasquez; but Nature shrinks from repetition, and at the last moment

she said, "The world has had Velasquez, another would be superfluous:

let there be Jimmy Whistler."

In the Nocturnes Mr. Whistler stands alone, withouta rival. In

portraits he is at his best when they are near to his Nocturnes in

intention, when the theme lends itself to an imaginative and

decorative treatment; for instance, as in the mother or Miss

Alexander. Mr. Whistler is at his worst when he is frankly realistic.

I have seen pictures by Mr. Henry Moore that I like better than "The

Blue Wave". Nor does Mr. Whistler seem to me to reach his highest

level in any one of the three portraits--Lady Archibald Campbell,

Miss Rose Corder, and "the lady in the fur jacket". I know that Mr.

Walter Sickert considers the portrait of Lady Archibald Campbell to be

Mr. Whistler's finest portrait. I submit, however, that the attitude

is theatrical and not very explicit. It is a movement that has not

been frankly observed, nor is it a movement that has been frankly

imagined. It has none of the artless elegance of Nature; it is full of

studio combinations; and yet it is not a frankly decorative

arrangement, as the portrait of the mother or Miss Alexander. When

Hals painted his Burgomasters, he was careful to place them in

definite and comprehensible surroundings. He never left us in doubt

either as to the time or the place; and the same obligations of time

and place, which Hals never shirked, seem to me to rest on the

painter, if he elects to paint his sitter in any attitude except one

of conventional repose.

Lady Archibald Campbell is represented in violent movement, looking

backwards over her shoulder as she walks up the picture; yet there is

nothing to show that she is not standing on the low table on which the

model poses, and the few necessary indications are left out because

they would interfere with the general harmony of his picture; because,

if the table on which she is standing were indicated, the movement of

outstretched arm would be incomprehensible. The hand, too, is somewhat

uncertain, undetermined, and a gesture is meaningless that the hand

does not determine and complete. I do not speak of the fingers of the

right hand, which are non-existent; after a dozen attempts to paint

the gloved hand, only an approximate result was obtained. Look at the

ear, and say that the painter's nerves did not give wayonce or twice.

And the likeness is vague and shadowy; she is only fairly

representative of her class. We see fairly well that she is a lady _du

grand monde_, who is, however, not without knowledge of _les environs

du monde_. But she is hardly English--she might be a French woman or

an American. She is a sort of hybrid. Miss Rose Corder and "the lady

in the fur jacket" are equally cosmopolitan; so, too, is Miss

Alexander. Only once has Mr. Whistler expressed race, and that was in

his portrait of his mother. Then these three ladies--Miss Corder, Lady

Archibald Campbell, and "the lady in the fur jacket"--wear the same

complexion: a pale yellow complexion, burnt and dried. With this

conventional tint he obtains unison and a totality of effect; but he

obtains this result at the expense of truth. Hals and Velasquez

obtained the same result, without, however, resorting to such

meretricious methods.

The portrait of the mother is, as every one knows, in the Luxemburg;

but the engraving reminds us of the honour which France has done, but

which we failed to do, to the great painter of the nineteenth century;


生词表:
  • failure [´feiljə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.失败;衰竭;破产   (初中英语单词)
  • character [´kæriktə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.特性;性质;人物;字   (初中英语单词)
  • confess [kən´fes] 移动到这儿单词发声  vt.供认;坦白;承认   (初中英语单词)
  • grammatical [grə´mætikəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.语法上的   (初中英语单词)
  • enormous [i´nɔ:məs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.巨大地,很,极   (初中英语单词)
  • punctuation [,pʌŋktju´eiʃen] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.标点符号;标点法   (初中英语单词)
  • capable [´keipəbəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.有能力;能干的   (初中英语单词)
  • painting [´peintiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.绘画;(油)画;着色   (初中英语单词)
  • plainly [´pleinli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.平坦地;简单地   (初中英语单词)
  • intention [in´tenʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.意图;打算;意义   (初中英语单词)
  • unfortunate [ʌn´fɔ:tʃunit] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.不幸的,运气差的   (初中英语单词)
  • critic [´kritik] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.批评家;吹毛求疵者   (初中英语单词)
  • brilliant [´briliənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.灿烂的;杰出的   (初中英语单词)
  • glitter [´glitə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.光辉 vi.闪烁,炫耀   (初中英语单词)
  • audience [´ɔ:diəns] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.听众;观众;接见   (初中英语单词)
  • contain [kən´tein] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.包含;容纳;抑制   (初中英语单词)
  • criticism [´kritisizəm] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.批评;评论(文)   (初中英语单词)
  • weakness [´wi:knis] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.虚弱;弱点,缺点   (初中英语单词)
  • equally [´i:kwəli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.相等地;平等地   (初中英语单词)
  • western [´westən] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.西的;西方的   (初中英语单词)
  • culture [´kʌltʃə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.修养;文化;饲养   (初中英语单词)
  • conscious [´kɔnʃəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.意识的;自觉的   (初中英语单词)
  • argument [´ɑ:gjumənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.辩论;争论;论证   (初中英语单词)
  • genius [´dʒi:niəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.天才(人物);天赋   (初中英语单词)
  • generation [,dʒenə´reiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.发生;世代;同龄人   (初中英语单词)
  • holland [´hɔlənd] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.荷兰   (初中英语单词)
  • painter [´peintə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.画家;(油)漆工   (初中英语单词)
  • physical [´fizikəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.物质的;有形的   (初中英语单词)
  • frenchman [´frentʃmən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.法国人   (初中英语单词)
  • italian [i´tæliən] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.意大利 n.意大利人   (初中英语单词)
  • muscle [´mʌsəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.肌肉;体力;力量   (初中英语单词)
  • reading [´ri:diŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.(阅)读;朗读;读物   (初中英语单词)
  • chapel [´tʃæpəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.小教堂   (初中英语单词)
  • writing [´raitiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.书写;写作;书法   (初中英语单词)
  • existence [ig´zistəns] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.存在;生存;生活   (初中英语单词)
  • weekly [´wi:kli] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.&ad.每周一次(的)   (初中英语单词)
  • instructive [in´strʌktiv] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.有益的   (初中英语单词)
  • interrupt [,intə´rʌpt] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.中断;打扰   (初中英语单词)
  • feeble [´fi:bəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.虚弱的,无力的   (初中英语单词)
  • indication [,indi´keiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.指示;征兆,迹象   (初中英语单词)
  • nervous [´nə:vəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.神经的;神经过敏的   (初中英语单词)
  • extreme [ik´stri:m] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.尽头的 n.极端   (初中英语单词)
  • slumber [´slʌmbə] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.&n.睡眠;沉睡状态   (初中英语单词)
  • distribution [,distri´bju:ʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.分配;分布(状态)   (初中英语单词)
  • treatment [´tri:tmənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.待遇;对待;治疗   (初中英语单词)
  • instance [´instəns] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.例子,实例,例证   (初中英语单词)
  • frankly [´fræŋkli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.直率地;慷慨地   (初中英语单词)
  • submit [səb´mit] 移动到这儿单词发声  vt.使服从;使忍受   (初中英语单词)
  • movement [´mu:vmənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.活动;运动;动作   (初中英语单词)
  • violent [´vaiələnt] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.强暴的;猛烈的   (初中英语单词)
  • standing [´stændiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.持续 a.直立的   (初中英语单词)
  • interfere [,intə´fiə] 移动到这儿单词发声  vi.干涉;妨碍;打扰   (初中英语单词)
  • harmony [´hɑ:məni] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.调合,协调,和谐   (初中英语单词)
  • gesture [´dʒestʃə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.手势 v.打手势   (初中英语单词)
  • dedicate [´dedikeit] 移动到这儿单词发声  vt.献给;献身于   (高中英语单词)
  • originally [ə´ridʒənəli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.本来;独创地   (高中英语单词)
  • portrait [´pɔ:trit] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.肖像;相片;雕像   (高中英语单词)
  • studied [´stʌdid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.故意的;有计划的   (高中英语单词)
  • apparently [ə´pærəntli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.显然,表面上地   (高中英语单词)
  • inevitable [i´nevitəbəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.不可避免的   (高中英语单词)
  • frantic [´fræntik] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.发狂的;急忙的   (高中英语单词)
  • reconcile [´rekənsail] 移动到这儿单词发声  vt.调和;使和谐   (高中英语单词)
  • bearing [´beəriŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.举止;忍耐;关系   (高中英语单词)
  • artistic [ɑ:´tistik] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.艺术的;有美感的   (高中英语单词)
  • ingenious [in´dʒi:niəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.富于创新的;巧妙的   (高中英语单词)
  • conspicuous [kən´spikjuəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.显著的;出众的   (高中英语单词)
  • solitary [´sɔlitəri] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.独居的;孤独的   (高中英语单词)
  • boldly [´bəuldli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.大胆地;醒目地   (高中英语单词)
  • athens [´æθinz] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.雅典   (高中英语单词)
  • relationship [ri´leiʃənʃip] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.关系;联系;亲属关系   (高中英语单词)
  • exhibition [eksi´biʃ(ə)n] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.展览;显示;表演   (高中英语单词)
  • internal [in´tə:nl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.内部的;国内的   (高中英语单词)
  • temperament [´tempərəmənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.气质;性格   (高中英语单词)
  • likeness [´laiknis] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.相似;肖像;外表   (高中英语单词)
  • stimulate [´stimjuleit] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.刺激;服兴奋剂   (高中英语单词)
  • personally [´pə:sənəli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.亲自;就个人来说   (高中英语单词)
  • whilst [wailst] 移动到这儿单词发声  conj.当…时候;虽然   (高中英语单词)
  • repose [ri´pəuz] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.&n.(使)休息;安息   (高中英语单词)
  • repetition [,repi´tiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.重复;背诵;复制品   (高中英语单词)
  • shadowy [´ʃædəui] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.有阴影的;模糊的   (高中英语单词)
  • complexion [kəm´plekʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.肤色;情况;局面   (高中英语单词)
  • sequence [´si:kwəns] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.继续;顺序;程序   (英语四级单词)
  • alderman [´ɔ:ldəmən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.市参议员;总督   (英语四级单词)
  • destructive [di´strʌktiv] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.破坏性的   (英语四级单词)
  • harmonious [hɑ:məuniəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.协调的,悦耳的   (英语四级单词)
  • exceeding [ik´si:diŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.超越的,非常的   (英语四级单词)
  • polish [´pəuliʃ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.波兰(人)的 n.波兰语   (英语四级单词)
  • ownership [´əunəʃip] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.所有权;所有制   (英语四级单词)
  • boyish [´bɔiiʃ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.少年的;幼稚的   (英语四级单词)
  • utterance [´ʌtərəns] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.发音;言辞;所说的话   (英语四级单词)
  • nationality [,næʃə´næliti] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.国籍;民族   (英语四级单词)
  • mathematics [,mæθə´mætiks] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.数学   (英语四级单词)
  • creative [kri:´eitiv] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.有创造力的;创作的   (英语四级单词)
  • essentially [i´senʃəli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.本质上,基本上   (英语四级单词)
  • undertook [,ʌndə´tuk] 移动到这儿单词发声  undertake的过去式   (英语四级单词)
  • gifted [´giftid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.有天赋的,有才华的   (英语四级单词)
  • masterpiece [´mɑ:stəpi:s] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.杰作;杰出的事   (英语四级单词)
  • lesser [´lesə] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.较小的;次要的   (英语四级单词)
  • contemplation [,kɔntem´pleiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.注视;冥想;打算   (英语四级单词)
  • defender [di´fendə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.保卫者;辩护者   (英语四级单词)
  • intolerable [in´tɔlərəb(ə)l] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.无法忍受的   (英语四级单词)
  • tension [´tenʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.紧张;压力;拉力   (英语四级单词)
  • decisive [di´saisiv] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.决定性的,确定的   (英语四级单词)
  • accomplished [ə´kʌmpliʃt] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.完成了的;熟练的   (英语四级单词)
  • outcome [´autkʌm] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.结果;后果;成果   (英语四级单词)
  • comparable [´kɔmpərəbəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.可比较的;类似的   (英语四级单词)
  • theatrical [θi´ætrikəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.戏院的;戏剧(性)的   (英语四级单词)
  • conventional [kən´venʃənəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.常规的;协定的   (英语四级单词)
  • approximate [ə´prɔksimit] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.近似的 v.接近   (英语四级单词)
  • journalism [´dʒə:nəlizəm] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.新闻业;新闻工作   (英语六级单词)
  • whistler [´wislə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.吹口哨的人   (英语六级单词)
  • inability [,inə´biliti] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.无能,无力   (英语六级单词)
  • denial [di´naiəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.否认;拒绝   (英语六级单词)
  • assured [ə´ʃuəd] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.确实的 n.被保险人   (英语六级单词)
  • intermediate [,intə´mi:diət] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.中间的   (英语六级单词)
  • adoration [,ædə´reiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.崇拜,敬爱   (英语六级单词)
  • omission [əu´miʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.省略;遗漏;失职   (英语六级单词)
  • robust [rəu´bʌst] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.强建的;茁壮的   (英语六级单词)
  • lacking [´lækiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.缺少的,没有的   (英语六级单词)
  • withheld [wið´held] 移动到这儿单词发声  withhold过去式(分词)   (英语六级单词)
  • imaginative [i´mædʒənətiv] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.富于想象(力)的   (英语六级单词)
  • elegance [´eligəns] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.优雅;优美;精美   (英语六级单词)
  • indefinite [in´definit] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.模糊的;无限期的   (英语六级单词)
  • hybrid [´haibrid] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.杂种;混合物   (英语六级单词)
  • unison [´ju:nisən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.协调,一致;齐唱   (英语六级单词)
  • engraving [in´greiviŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.雕刻术;雕板   (英语六级单词)

  • 上传人 欢乐鱼 分享于 2017-06-26 17:05:57
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