酷兔英语



THE DEALINGS OF CAPTAIN SHARKEY

_and Other Tales of Pirates_

BY A. CONAN DOYLE

NEW YORK

GEORGE H. DORAN COMPANY

COPYRIGHT, 1905, 1908, 1909, 1910, 1911, 1913,

1914, 1918, 1919,

BY A. CONAN DOYLE

COPYRIGHT, 1910,

BY CHARLES SCRIBNER'S SONS

COPYRIGHT, 1911,

BY ASSOCIATED SUNDAY MAGAZINES, INC.

COPYRIGHT, 1908,

BY THE MCCLURE COMPANY

COPYRIGHT, 1900, 1902,

BY THE S. S. MCCLURE COMPANY

PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

CONTENTS

TALES OF PIRATES

I CAPTAIN SHARKEY: HOW THE GOVERNOR OF SAINT KITT'S CAME HOME

II THE DEALINGS OF CAPTAIN SHARKEY WITH STEPHEN CRADDOCK

III THE BLIGHTING OF SHARKEY

IV HOW COPLEY BANKS SLEW CAPTAIN SHARKEY

V THE "SLAPPING SAL"

VI A PIRATE OF THE LAND (ONE CROWDED HOUR)

TALES OF BLUE WATER

VII THE STRIPED CHEST

VIII THE CAPTAIN OF THE "POLESTAR"

IX THE FIEND OF THE COOPERAGE

X JELLAND'S VOYAGE

XI J. HABAKUK JEPHSON'S STATEMENT

XII THAT LITTLE SQUARE BOX

THE DEALINGS OF CAPTAIN SHARKEY

_and Other Stories of Pirates_

TALES OF PIRATES

I

CAPTAIN SHARKEY: HOW THE GOVERNOR OF SAINT KITT'S CAME HOME

When the great wars of the Spanish Succession had been brought to an end

by the Treaty of Utrecht, the vast number of privateers which had been

fitted out by the contending parties found their occupation gone. Some

took to the more peaceful but less lucrative ways of ordinary commerce,

others were absorbed into the fishing-fleets, and a few of the more

reckless hoisted the Jolly Rodger at the mizzen and the bloody flag at

the main, declaring a private war upon their own account against the

whole human race.

With mixed crews, recruited from every nation they scoured the seas,

disappearing occasionally to careen in some lonely inlet, or putting in

for a debauch at some outlaying port, where they dazzled the inhabitants

by their lavishness and horrified them by their brutalities.

On the Coromandel Coast, at Madagascar, in the African waters, and above

all in the West Indian and American seas, the pirates were a constant

menace. With an insolentluxury they would regulate their depredations

by the comfort of the seasons, harrying New England in the summer and

dropping south again to the tropical islands in the winter.

They were the more to be dreaded because they had none of that

discipline and restraint which made their predecessors, the Buccaneers,

both formidable and respectable. These Ishmaels of the sea rendered an

account to no man, and treated their prisoners according to the drunken

whim of the moment. Flashes of grotesquegenerosity alternated with

longer stretches of inconceivable ferocity, and the skipper who fell

into their hands might find himself dismissed with his cargo, after

serving as boon companion in some hideous debauch, or might sit at his

cabin table with his own nose and his lips served up with pepper and

salt in front of him. It took a stout seaman in those days to ply his

calling in the Caribbean Gulf.

Such a man was Captain John Scarrow, of the ship _Morning Star_, and yet

he breathed a long sigh of relief when he heard the splash of the

falling anchor and swung at his moorings within a hundred yards of the

guns of the citadel of Basseterre. St. Kitt's was his final port of

call, and early next morning his bowsprit would be pointed for Old

England. He had had enough of those robber-haunted seas. Ever since he

had left Maracaibo upon the Main, with his full lading of sugar and red

pepper, he had winced at every topsail which glimmered over the violet

edge of the tropical sea. He had coasted up the Windward Islands,

touching here and there, and assailed continually by stories of villainy

and outrage.

Captain Sharkey, of the 20-gun pirate barque, _Happy Delivery_, had

passed down the coast, and had littered it with gutted vessels and with

murdered men. Dreadful anecdotes were current of his grim pleasantries

and of his inflexible ferocity. From the Bahamas to the Main his

coal-black barque, with the ambiguous name, had been freighted with

death and many things which are worse than death. So nervous was Captain

Scarrow, with his new full-rigged ship and her full and valuable lading,

that he struck out to the west as far as Bird's Island to be out of the

usual track of commerce. And yet even in those solitary waters he had

been unable to shake off sinister traces of Captain Sharkey.

One morning they had raised a single skiff adrift upon the face of the

ocean. Its only occupant was a delirious seaman, who yelled hoarsely as

they hoisted him aboard, and showed a dried-up tongue like a black and

wrinkled fungus at the back of his mouth. Water and nursing soon

transformed him into the strongest and smartest sailor on the ship. He

was from Marblehead, in New England, it seemed, and was the sole

survivor of a schooner which had been scuttled by the dreadful Sharkey.

For a week Hiram Evanson, for that was his name, had been adrift beneath

a tropical sun. Sharkey had ordered the mangled remains of his late

captain to be thrown into the boat, "as provisions for the voyage," but

the seaman had at once committed them to the deep, lest the temptation

should be more than he could bear. He had lived upon his own huge frame,

until, at the last moment, the _Morning Star_ had found him in that

madness which is the precursor of such a death. It was no bad find for

Captain Scarrow, for, with a short-handed crew, such a seaman as this

big New Englander was a prize worth having. He vowed that he was the

only man whom Captain Sharkey had ever placed under an obligation.

Now that they lay under the guns of Basseterre, all danger from the

pirate was at an end, and yet the thought of him lay heavily upon the

seaman's mind as he watched the agent's boat shooting out from the

custom-house quay.

"I'll lay you a wager, Morgan," said he to the first mate, "that the

agent will speak of Sharkey in the first hundred words that pass his

lips."

"Well, captain, I'll have you a silver dollar, and chance it," said the

rough old Bristol man beside him.

The negro rowers shot the boat alongside, and the linen-clad steersman

sprang up the ladder.

"Welcome, Captain Scarrow!" he cried. "Have you heard about Sharkey?"

The captain grinned at the mate.

"What devilry has he been up to now?" he asked.

"Devilry! You've not heard, then! Why, we've got him safe under lock and

key here at Basseterre. He was tried last Wednesday, and he is to be

hanged to-morrow morning."

Captain and mate gave a shout of joy, which an instant later was taken

up by the crew. Discipline was forgotten as they scrambled up through

the break of the poop to hear the news. The New Englander was in the

front of them with a radiant face turned up to heaven, for he came of

the Puritan stock.

"Sharkey to be hanged!" he cried. "You don't know, Master Agent, if they

lack a hangman, do you?"

"Stand back!" cried the mate, whose outraged sense of discipline was

even stronger than his interest at the news. "I'll pay that dollar,

Captain Scarrow, with the lightest heart that ever I paid a wager yet.

How came the villain to be taken?"

"Why, as to that, he became more than his own comrades could abide, and

they took such a horror of him that they would not have him on the ship.

So they marooned him upon the Little Mangles to the south of the

Mysteriosa Bank, and there he was found by a Portobello trader, who

brought him in. There was talk of sending him to Jamaica to be tried,

but our good little governor, Sir Charles Ewan, would not hear of it.

'He's my meat,' said he, 'and I claim the cooking of it.' If you can

stay till to-morrow morning at ten, you'll see the joint swinging."

"I wish I could," said the captain, wistfully, "but I am sadly behind

time now. I should start with the evening tide."

"That you can't do," said the agent with decision. "The Governor is

going back with you."

"The Governor!"

"Yes. He's had a dispatch from Government to return without delay. The

fly-boat that brought it has gone on to Virginia. So Sir Charles has

been waiting for you, as I told him you were due before the rains."

"Well, well!" cried the captain, in some perplexity, "I'm a plain

seaman, and I don't know much of governors and baronets and their ways.

I don't remember that I ever so much as spoke to one. But if it's in

King George's service, and he asks a cast in the _Morning Star_ as far

as London, I'll do what I can for him. There's my own cabin he can have

and welcome. As to the cooking, it's lobscouse and salmagundy six days

in the week; but he can bring his own cook aboard with him if he thinks

our galley too rough for his taste."

"You need not trouble your mind, Captain Scarrow," said the agent. "Sir

Charles is in weak health just now, only clear of a quartan ague, and it

is likely he will keep his cabin most of the voyage. Dr. Larousse said

that he would have sunk had the hanging of Sharkey not put fresh life

into him. He has a great spirit in him, though, and you must not blame

him if he is somewhat short in his speech."

"He may say what he likes and do what he likes so long as he does not

come athwart my hawse when I am working the ship," said the captain. "He

is Governor of St. Kitt's, but I am Governor of the _Morning Star_. And,

by his leave, I must weigh with the first tide, for I owe a duty to my

employer, just as he does to King George."

"He can scarce be ready to-night, for he has many things to set in order

before he leaves."

"The early morning tide, then."

"Very good. I shall send his things aboard to-night, and he will follow

them to-morrow early if I can prevail upon him to leave St. Kitt's

without seeing Sharkey do the rogue's hornpipe. His own orders were

instant, so it may be that he will come at once. It is likely that Dr.

Larousse may attend him upon the journey."

Left to themselves, the captain and mate made the best preparations

which they could for their illustrious passenger. The largest cabin was

turned out and adorned in his honour, and orders were given by which

barrels of fruit and some cases of wine should be brought off to vary

the plain food of an ocean-going trader. In the evening the Governor's

baggage began to arrive--great ironbound ant-proof trunks, and official

tin packing-cases, with other strange-shaped packages, which suggested

the cocked hat or the sword within. And then there came a note, with a

heraldic device upon the big red seal, to say that Sir Charles Ewan made

his compliments to Captain Scarrow, and that he hoped to be with him in

the morning as early as his duties and his infirmities would permit.

He was as good as his word, for the first grey of dawn had hardly begun

to deepen into pink when he was brought alongside, and climbed with some

difficulty up the ladder. The captain had heard that the Governor was an

eccentric, but he was hardly prepared for the curious figure who came

limping feebly down his quarter-deck, his steps supported by a thick

bamboo cane. He wore a Ramillies wig, all twisted into little tails like

a poodle's coat, and cut so low across the brow that the large green

glasses which covered his eyes looked as if they were hung from it. A

fierce beak of a nose, very long and very thin, cut the air in front of

him. His ague had caused him to swathe his throat and chin with a broad

linen cravat, and he wore a loose damask powdering-gown secured by a

cord round the waist. As he advanced he carried his masterful nose high

in the air, but his head turned slowly from side to side in the helpless

manner of the purblind, and he called in a high, querulous voice for the

captain.

"You have my things?" he asked.

"Yes, Sir Charles."

"Have you wine aboard?"

"I have ordered five cases, sir."

"And tobacco?"

"There is a keg of Trinidad."

"You play a hand at piquet?"

"Passably well, sir."

"Then up anchor, and to sea!"

There was a fresh westerly wind, so by the time the sun was fairly

through the morning haze, the ship was hull down from the islands. The

decrepit Governor still limped the deck, with one guiding hand upon the

quarter-rail.

"You are on Government service now, Captain," said he. "They are

counting the days till I come to Westminster, I promise you. Have you

all that she will carry?"

"Every inch, Sir Charles."

"Keep her so if you blow the sails out of her. I fear, Captain Scarrow,

that you will find a blind and broken man a poor companion for your

voyage."

"I am honoured in enjoying your Excellency's society," said the Captain.

"But I am sorry that your eyes should be so afflicted."

"Yes, indeed. It is the cursed glare of the sun on the white streets of

Basseterre which has gone far to burn them out."

"I had heard also that you had been plagued by a quartan ague."

"Yes; I have had a pyrexy, which has reduced me much."

"We had set aside a cabin for your surgeon."

"Ah, the rascal! There was no budging him, for he has a snug business

amongst the merchants. But hark!"

He raised his ring-covered hand in the air. From far astern there came

the low deep thunder of cannon.

"It is from the island!" cried the captain in astonishment. "Can it be a

signal for us to put back?"

The Governor laughed.

"You have heard that Sharkey, the pirate, is to be hanged this morning.

I ordered the batteries to salute when the rascal was kicking his last,

so that I might know of it out at sea. There's an end of Sharkey!"

"There's an end of Sharkey!" cried the captain; and the crew took up the

cry as they gathered in little knots upon the deck and stared back at

the low, purple line of the vanishing land.

It was a cheering omen for their start across the Western Ocean, and the

invalid Governor found himself a popular man on board, for it was

generally understood that but for his insistence upon an immediate trial

and sentence, the villain might have played upon some more venal judge

and so escaped. At dinner that day Sir Charles gave many anecdotes of

the deceased pirate; and so affable was he, and so skilful in adapting

his conversation to men of lower degree, that captain, mate, and

Governor smoked their long pipes and drank their claret as three good

comrades should.


生词表:
  • governor [´gʌvənə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.总督;州长   (初中英语单词)
  • succession [sək´seʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.继任;继承(权)   (初中英语单词)
  • occupation [,ɔkju´peiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.职业的;军事占领的   (初中英语单词)
  • peaceful [´pi:sfəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.和平的;平静的   (初中英语单词)
  • bloody [´blʌdi] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.(流)血的;血腥的   (初中英语单词)
  • account [ə´kaunt] 移动到这儿单词发声  vi.说明 vt.认为 n.帐目   (初中英语单词)
  • occasionally [ə´keiʒənəli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.偶然地;非经常地   (初中英语单词)
  • lonely [´ləunli] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.孤独的;无人烟的   (初中英语单词)
  • indian [´indiən] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.印度的 n.印度人   (初中英语单词)
  • luxury [´lʌkʃəri] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.奢侈(品);享受   (初中英语单词)
  • companion [kəm´pæniən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.同伴;同事;伴侣   (初中英语单词)
  • pepper [´pepə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.胡椒 vt.加胡椒   (初中英语单词)
  • relief [ri´li:f] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.救济;援救;减轻   (初中英语单词)
  • splash [splæʃ] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.&n.溅水声;涉水而进   (初中英语单词)
  • anchor [´æŋkə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.锚 v.抛锚   (初中英语单词)
  • pointed [´pɔintid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.尖(锐)的;中肯的   (初中英语单词)
  • dreadful [´dredful] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.可怕的;讨厌的   (初中英语单词)
  • nervous [´nə:vəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.神经的;神经过敏的   (初中英语单词)
  • valuable [´væljuəbəl, -jubəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.有价值的,贵重的   (初中英语单词)
  • commerce [´kɔmə:s] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.商业;社交;交流   (初中英语单词)
  • unable [ʌn´eibəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.不能的;无能为力的   (初中英语单词)
  • aboard [ə´bɔ:d] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.&prep.在…上   (初中英语单词)
  • wednesday [´wenzdi] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.星期三   (初中英语单词)
  • instant [´instənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.立即的 n.紧迫;瞬间   (初中英语单词)
  • discipline [´disiplin] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.纪律;训练   (初中英语单词)
  • horror [´hɔrə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.恐怖;战栗   (初中英语单词)
  • virginia [və´dʒinjə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.佛吉尼亚(州)   (初中英语单词)
  • waiting [´weitiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.等候;伺候   (初中英语单词)
  • welcome [´welkəm] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.受欢迎的;可喜的   (初中英语单词)
  • voyage [´vɔi-idʒ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.&vi.航海;航程;旅行   (初中英语单词)
  • working [´wə:kiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.工人的;劳动的   (初中英语单词)
  • scarce [skeəs, skers] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.缺乏的;稀有的   (初中英语单词)
  • prevail [pri´veil] 移动到这儿单词发声  vi.胜(过);流行;普遍   (初中英语单词)
  • device [di´vais] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.装置;器具;策略   (初中英语单词)
  • throat [θrəut] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.咽喉;嗓子;出入口   (初中英语单词)
  • advanced [əd´vɑ:nst] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.先进的;高级的   (初中英语单词)
  • thunder [´θʌndə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.雷 vi.打雷 vt.吼出   (初中英语单词)
  • astonishment [ə´stɔniʃmənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.吃惊;惊异   (初中英语单词)
  • salute [sə´lu:t] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.&v.招呼;行礼;敬礼   (初中英语单词)
  • purple [´pə:pl] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.紫色 a.紫(红)的   (初中英语单词)
  • western [´westən] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.西的;西方的   (初中英语单词)
  • sentence [´sentəns] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.判决 vt.宣判;处刑   (初中英语单词)
  • pirate [´paiərət] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.海盗 v.做海盗;掠夺   (高中英语单词)
  • crowded [´kraudid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.充(拥)满了的   (高中英语单词)
  • regulate [´regjuleit] 移动到这儿单词发声  vt.管理;调整;规定   (高中英语单词)
  • tropical [´trɔpikəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.热带地区的   (高中英语单词)
  • restraint [ri´streint] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.抑制;管束;克制   (高中英语单词)
  • formidable [´fɔ:midəbəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.可怕的;艰难的   (高中英语单词)
  • respectable [ri´spektəbəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.可敬的;有身价的   (高中英语单词)
  • generosity [,dʒenə´rɔsiti] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.慷慨;慷慨的行为   (高中英语单词)
  • hideous [´hidiəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.丑陋的,可怕的   (高中英语单词)
  • continually [kən´tinjuəli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.不断地,频繁地   (高中英语单词)
  • solitary [´sɔlitəri] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.独居的;孤独的   (高中英语单词)
  • schooner [´sku:nə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.纵帆船   (高中英语单词)
  • alongside [əlɔŋ´said] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.在旁 prep.横靠   (高中英语单词)
  • radiant [´reidiənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.发光的 n.光源(体)   (高中英语单词)
  • puritan [´pjuəritən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.&a.清教徒(的)   (高中英语单词)
  • trader [´treidə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.商人;商船   (高中英语单词)
  • dispatch [di´spætʃ] 移动到这儿单词发声  vt.&n.发送;派遣;调度   (高中英语单词)
  • hanging [´hæŋiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.绞刑 a.悬挂着的   (高中英语单词)
  • seeing [si:iŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  see的现在分词 n.视觉   (高中英语单词)
  • illustrious [i´lʌstriəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.杰出的,显赫的   (高中英语单词)
  • deepen [´di:pən] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.加深;加浓   (高中英语单词)
  • ladder [´lædə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.梯子;阶梯   (高中英语单词)
  • rascal [´rɑ:skəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.流氓   (高中英语单词)
  • striped [´straipt] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.有条纹的   (英语四级单词)
  • grotesque [grəu´tesk] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.奇异的,想象中的   (英语四级单词)
  • skipper [´skipə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.&vi.(当)船长   (英语四级单词)
  • sinister [´sinistə] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.阴险的;不吉的   (英语四级单词)
  • occupant [´ɔkjupənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.居住者;占有人   (英语四级单词)
  • englander [´iŋgləndə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.英格兰人;英国人   (英语四级单词)
  • villain [´vilən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.坏人;恶棍;反面角色   (英语四级单词)
  • perplexity [pə´pleksiti] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.困惑;为难;纷乱   (英语四级单词)
  • galley [´gæli] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.单层甲板大帆船   (英语四级单词)
  • feebly [´fi:bli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.虚弱地;贫乏地   (英语四级单词)
  • insolent [´insələnt] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.傲慢的;无礼的   (英语六级单词)
  • ferocity [fə´rɔsiti] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.凶残,凶猛,暴行   (英语六级单词)
  • seaman [´si:mən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.海员,水手   (英语六级单词)
  • citadel [´sitədl] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.城堡;堡垒;避难所   (英语六级单词)
  • hoarsely [´hɔ:sli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.嘶哑地   (英语六级单词)
  • fungus [´fʌŋgəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.真菌;菌类   (英语六级单词)
  • wistfully [´wistfuli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.渴望地;不满足地   (英语六级单词)
  • cravat [krə´væt] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.领带;围巾   (英语六级单词)
  • damask [´dæməsk] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.锦缎 a.缎子的   (英语六级单词)
  • insistence [in´sistəns] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.坚持;坚决主张   (英语六级单词)

  • 上传人 欢乐鱼 分享于 2017-06-26 17:05:52
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