酷兔英语



[Illustration: She truly did well in this performance. (Page 252)

_Frontispiece_]

THE

CORNER HOUSE GIRLS

IN A PLAY

HOW THEY REHEARSED

HOW THEY ACTED

AND WHAT THE PLAY BROUGHT IN

BY

GRACE BROOKS HILL

AUTHOR OF "THE CORNER HOUSE GIRLS," "THE CORNER

HOUSE GIRLS AT SCHOOL," ETC.

_ILLUSTRATED BY

R. EMMETT OWEN_

NEW YORK

BARSE & HOPKINS

PUBLISHERS

BOOKS FOR GIRLS

The Corner House Girls Series

By Grace Brooks Hill

_12mo. Cloth. Illustrated. Price per volume,

75 cents, postpaid._

THE CORNER HOUSE GIRLS

THE CORNER HOUSE GIRLS AT SCHOOL

THE CORNER HOUSE GIRLS UNDER CANVAS

THE CORNER HOUSE GIRLS IN A PLAY

THE CORNER HOUSE GIRLS' ODD FIND

THE CORNER HOUSE GIRLS ON A TOUR

(_Other volumes in preparation_)

BARSE & HOPKINS

PUBLISHERS NEW YORK

Copyright, 1916,

by

Barse & Hopkins

_The Corner House Girls in a Play_

VAIL-BALLOU COMPANY

BINGHAMTON AND NEW YORK

CONTENTS

CHAPTER PAGE

I THE SOVEREIGNS OF ENGLAND 9

II THE LADY IN THE GRAY CLOAK 18

III BILLY BUMPS' BANQUET 27

IV THE BASKET BALL TEAM IN TROUBLE 42

V THE STONE IN THE POOL 57

VI JUST OUT OF REACH 66

VII THE CORE OF THE APPLE 75

VIII LYCURGUS BILLET'S EAGLE BAIT 84

IX BOB BUCKHAM TAKES A HAND 101

X SOMETHING ABOUT OLD TIMES 112

XI THE STRAWBERRY MARK 122

XII TEA WITH MRS. ELAND 134

XIII NEALE SUFFERS A SHORTENING PROCESS 145

XIV THE FIRST REHEARSAL 156

XV THE HALLOWE'EN PARTY 167

XVI THE FIVE-DOLLAR GOLD PIECE 175

XVII THE MYSTERIOUS LETTER 184

XVIII MISS PEPPERILL AND THE GRAY LADY 193

XIX A THANKSGIVING SKATING PARTY 198

XX NEALE'S ENDLESS CHAIN 206

XXI THE CORNER HOUSE THANKSGIVING 212

XXII CLOUDS AND SUNSHINE 217

XXIII SWIFTWING, THE HUMMINGBIRD 228

XXIV THE FINAL REHEARSAL 240

XXV A GREAT SUCCESS 247

ILLUSTRATIONS

PAGE

She truly did well in this performance _Frontispiece_

At the moment the eagle dropped with spread talons,

the big dog leaped 103

They saw two huge pumpkin lanterns grinning a

welcome from the gateposts 173

The scaffolding pulled apart slowly, falling forward

through the drop 238

THE CORNER HOUSE GIRLS IN A PLAY

CHAPTER I

THE SOVEREIGNS OF ENGLAND

"I never can learn them in the wide, wide world! I just know I never

can, Dot!"

"Dear me! I'm dreadfully sorry for you, Tess," responded Dorothy

Kenway--only nobody ever called her by her full name, for she really was

too small to achieve the dignity of anything longer than "Dot."

"I'm dreadfully sorry for you, Tess," she repeated, hugging the

Alice-doll a little closer and wrapping the lace "throw" carefully about

the shoulders of her favorite child. The Alice-doll had never enjoyed

robust health since her awful experience of more than a year before,

when she had been buried alive.

Of course, Dot had not got as far in school as the sovereigns of

England. She had not as yet heard very much about the history of her own

country. She knew, of course, that Columbus discovered it, the Pilgrims

settled it, that George Washington was the father of it, and Abraham

Lincoln saved it.

Tess Kenway was usually very quick in her books, and she was now

prepared to enter a class in the lower grammar grade of the Milton

school in which she would have easy lessons in English history. She had

just purchased the history on High Street, for school would open for the

autumn term in a few days.

Mr. Englehart, one of the School Board and an influential citizen of

Milton, had a penchant for beginning at the beginning of things. As he

put it: "How can our children be grounded well in the history of our own

country if they are not informed upon the salient points of English

history--the Mother Country, from whom we obtained our first laws, and

from whom came our early leaders?"

As the two youngest Kenway girls came out of the stationery and book

store, Miss Pepperill was entering. Tess and Dot had met Miss Pepperill

at church the Sunday previous, and Tess knew that the rather

sharp-featured, bespectacled lady was to be her new teacher.

The girls whom Tess knew, who had already had experience with Miss

Pepperill called her "Pepperpot." She was supposed to be very irritable,

and she _did_ have red hair. She shot questions out at one in a most

disconcerting way, and Dot was quite amazed and startled by the way Miss

Pepperill pounced on Tess.

"Let's see your book, child," Miss Pepperill said, seizing Tess' recent

purchase. "Ah--yes. So you are to be in my room, are you?"

"Yes, ma'am," admitted Tess, timidly.

"Ah--yes! What is the succession of the sovereigns of England? Name

them!"

Now, if Miss Pepperill had demanded that Tess Kenway name the Pleiades,

the latter would have been no more startled--or no less able to reply

intelligently.

"Ah--yes!" snapped Miss Pepperill, seeing Tess' vacuous expression. "I

shall ask you that the first day you are in my room. Be prepared to

answer it. The succession of the sovereigns of England," and she swept

on into the store, leaving the children on the sidewalk, wonderfully

impressed.

They had walked over into the Parade Ground, and seated themselves on

one of the park benches in sight of the old Corner House, as Milton

people had called the Stower homestead, on the corner of Willow Street,

from time immemorial. Tess' hopelessannouncement followed their sitting

on the bench for at least half an hour.

"Why, I can't never!" she sighed, making it positive by at least two

negatives. "I never had an idea England had such an awful long string of

kings. It's worse than the list of Presidents of the United States."

"Is it?" Dot observed, curiously. "It must be awful annoyable to have to

learn 'em."

"Goodness, Dot! There you go again with one of your big words,"

exclaimed Tess, in vexation. "Who ever heard of 'annoyable' before? You

must have invented that."

Dot calmly ignored the criticism. It must be confessed that she loved

the sound of long words, and sometimes, as Agnes said, "made an awful

mess of polysyllables." Agnes was the Kenway next older than Tess, while

Ruth was seventeen, the oldest of all, and had for more than three years

been the house-mother of the Kenway family.

Ruth and Agnes were at home in the old Corner House at this very hour.

There lived in the big dwelling, with the four Corner House Girls, Aunt

Sarah Maltby (who really was no relative of the girls, but a partial

charge upon their charity), Mrs. MacCall, their housekeeper, and old

Uncle Rufus, Uncle Peter Stower's black butler and general factotum, who

had been left to the care of the old man's heirs when he died.

The first volume of this series, called "The Corner House Girls," told

the story of the coming of the four sisters and Aunt Sarah Maltby to the

Stower homestead, and of their first adventures in Milton--getting

settled in their new home and making friends among their neighbors.

In "The Corner House Girls at School," the second volume, the four

Kenway sisters extended the field of their acquaintance in Milton and

thereabout, entered the local schools in the several grades to which

they were assigned, made more friends and found some few rivals. They

began to feel, too, that responsibility which comes with improved

fortunes, for Uncle Peter Stower had left a considerableestate to the

four girls, of which Mr. Howbridge, the lawyer, was administrator as

well as the girls' guardian.

Now the second summer of their sojourn at the old Corner House was just

ending, and the girls had but recently returned from a most delightful

outing at Pleasant Cove, on the Atlantic Coast, some distance away from

Milton, which was an inland town.

All the fun and adventure of that vacation are related in "The Corner

House Girls Under Canvas," the third volume of the series, and the one

immediately preceding the present story.

Tess was seldom vindictive; but after she had puzzled her poor brain for

this half hour, trying to pick out and to get straight the Williams and

Stephens and Henrys and Johns and Edwards and Richards, to say nothing

of the Georges, who had reigned over England, she was quite flushed and

excited.

"I know I'm just going to de-_test_ that Miss Pepperpot!" she exclaimed.

"I--I could throw this old history at her--I just could!"

"But you couldn't hit her, Tess," Dot observed placidly. "You know you

couldn't."

"Why not?"

"Because you can't throw anything straight--no straighter than Sammy

Pinkney's ma. I heard her scolding Sammy the other day for throwing

stones. She says, 'Sammy, don't you let me catch you throwing any more

stones.'"

"And did he mind her?" asked Tess.

"I don't know," Dot replied reflectively. "But he says to her: 'What'll

I do if the other fellers throw 'em at me?' 'Just you come and tell me,

Sammy, if they do,' says Mrs. Pinkney."

"Well?" queried Tess, as her sister seemed inclined to stop.

"I didn't see what good that would do, myself," confessed Dot. "Telling

Mrs. Pinkney, I mean. And Sammy says to her: 'What's the use of telling

you, Ma? You couldn't hit the broad side of a barn!' _I_ don't think

_you_ could fling that hist'ry straight at Miss Pepperpot, Tess."

"Huh!" said Tess, not altogether pleased. "I _feel_ I could hit her,

anyway."

"Maybe Aggie could learn you the names of those sov-runs----"

"'Sovereigns'!" exclaimed Tess. "For pity's sake, get the word right,

child!"

Dot pouted and Tess, being in a somewhat nagging mood--which was

entirely strange for her--continued:

"And don't say 'learn' for 'teach.' How many times has Ruthie told you

that?"

"I don't care," retorted Dorothy Kenway. "I don't think so much of the

English language--or the English sov-er-reigns--so now! If folks can

talk, and make themselves understood, isn't that enough?"

"It doesn't seem so," sighed Tess, despondent again as she glanced at

the open history.

"Oh, I tell you what!" cried Dot, suddenly eager. "You ask Neale O'Neil.

I'm sure _he_ can help you. He teached me how to play jack-stones."

Tess ignored this flagrant lapse from school English, and said, rather

haughtily:

"I wouldn't ask a boy."

"Oh, my! _I_ would," Dot replied, her eyes big and round. "I'd ask

anybody if I wanted to know anything very bad. And Neale O'Neil's quite

the nicest boy that ever was. Aggie says so."

"Ruth and I don't approve of boys," Tess said loftily. "And I don't

believe Neale knows the sovereigns of England. Oh! look at those men,

Dot!"

Dot squirmed about on the bench to look out on Parade Street. An

erecting gang of the telegraph company was putting up a pole. The deep

hole had been dug for it beside the old pole, and the men, with spikes

in their hands, were beginning to raise the new pole from the ground.

Two men at either side had hold of ropes to steady the big pine stick.

Up it went, higher and higher, while the overseer stood at the butt to

guide it into the hole dug in the sidewalk.

Just as the pole was about half raised into its place, and a lineman had

gone quickly up a neighboring pole to fasten a guy-wire to hold it, the

interested children on the park bench saw a woman crossing the street

near the scene of the telegraph company men's activities.

"Oh, Tess!" Dot exclaimed. "What a funny dress she wears!"

"Yes," said the older Kenway girl, eying the woman quite as curiously as

her sister.

The strange woman wore a long, gray cloak, and a little gray, close

bonnet, with a stiff, white frill framing her face. That face was very

sweet, but rather sad of expression. The children could not see her hair

and had no means of guessing her age, for her cheeks were healthily pink

and her gray eyes bright.

These facts Tess and Dot observed and digested in their small minds

before the woman reached the curb.

"Isn't she pretty?" whispered Tess.

Before Dot could reply there sounded a wild cry from the man on the

pole. The guy-wire had slipped.

"'Ware below!" he shouted.

The woman did not notice. Perhaps the close cap she wore kept her from

hearing distinctly. The writhing wire flew through the air like a great

snake.

Tess dropped her history and sprang up; but Dot did not loose her hold

upon the rather battered "Alice-doll" which was her dearest possession.

She clung, indeed, to the doll all the closer, but she screamed to the

woman quite as loudly as Tess did, and her little blue-stockinged legs

twinkled across the grass to the point of danger, quite as rapidly as

did Tess' brown ones.


生词表:
  • performance [pə´fɔ:məns] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.履行;行为;工作   (初中英语单词)
  • mysterious [mi´stiəriəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.神秘的;难以理解的   (初中英语单词)
  • sunshine [´sʌnʃain] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.日光,阳光   (初中英语单词)
  • dreadfully [dredfuli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.可怕地;糟透地   (初中英语单词)
  • achieve [ə´tʃi:v] 移动到这儿单词发声  vt.完成;达到;获得   (初中英语单词)
  • dignity [´digniti] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.尊严,尊贵;高官显贵   (初中英语单词)
  • columbus [kə´lʌmbəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.哥伦布   (初中英语单词)
  • beginning [bi´giniŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.开始,开端;起源   (初中英语单词)
  • previous [´pri:viəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.先,前,以前的   (初中英语单词)
  • supposed [sə´pəuzd] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.想象的;假定的   (初中英语单词)
  • succession [sək´seʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.继任;继承(权)   (初中英语单词)
  • willow [´wiləu] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.柳树   (初中英语单词)
  • curiously [´kjuəriəsli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.好奇地;稀奇古怪地   (初中英语单词)
  • calmly [´kɑ:mli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.平静地;无风浪地   (初中英语单词)
  • criticism [´kritisizəm] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.批评;评论(文)   (初中英语单词)
  • dwelling [´dweliŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.住所;寓所   (初中英语单词)
  • relative [´relətiv] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.有关系的 n.亲属   (初中英语单词)
  • volume [´vɔlju:m, ´vɑljəm] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.卷;书籍;体积;容量   (初中英语单词)
  • series [´siəri:z] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.连续;系列;丛书   (初中英语单词)
  • acquaintance [ə´kweintəns] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.相识;熟人,相识的人   (初中英语单词)
  • responsibility [ri,spɔnsə´biliti] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.责任(心);职责;任务   (初中英语单词)
  • considerable [kən´sidərəbəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.重要的;值得重视   (初中英语单词)
  • estate [i´steit] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.财产;庄园;等级   (初中英语单词)
  • lawyer [´lɔ:jə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.律师;法学家   (初中英语单词)
  • vacation [və´keiʃən, vei´keiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.假期;休庭期;腾空   (初中英语单词)
  • altogether [,ɔ:ltə´geðə] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.完全;总而言之   (初中英语单词)
  • approve [ə´pru:v] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.赞成;同意;批准   (初中英语单词)
  • telegraph [´teligrɑ:f] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.&v.(打)电报;电告   (初中英语单词)
  • neighboring [´neibəriŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.邻近的;接壤的   (初中英语单词)
  • fasten [´fɑ:sən] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.扎牢;闩住;钉牢   (初中英语单词)
  • distinctly [di´stiŋktli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.清楚地,明晰地   (初中英语单词)
  • sprang [spræŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  spring 的过去式   (初中英语单词)
  • banquet [´bæŋkwit] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.宴会,盛宴   (高中英语单词)
  • strawberry [´strɔ:bəri] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.草莓   (高中英语单词)
  • thanksgiving [´θæŋks,giviŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  感恩节   (高中英语单词)
  • pumpkin [´pʌmpkin] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.南瓜   (高中英语单词)
  • repeated [ri´pi:tid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.反复的;重复的   (高中英语单词)
  • influential [,influ´enʃəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.有力的,有影响的   (高中英语单词)
  • seeing [si:iŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  see的现在分词 n.视觉   (高中英语单词)
  • sidewalk [´saidwɔ:k] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.人行道   (高中英语单词)
  • parade [pə´reid] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.&v.游行;检阅   (高中英语单词)
  • hopeless [´həupləs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.无望的,无可救药的   (高中英语单词)
  • announcement [ə´naunsmənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.通告;宣布;言谈   (高中英语单词)
  • positive [´pɔzətiv] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.确定的   (高中英语单词)
  • housekeeper [´haus,ki:pə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.主妇,女管家   (高中英语单词)
  • butler [´bʌtlə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.(男)管家   (高中英语单词)
  • inland [´inlənd, in´lænd] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.&n.内地的 ad.在内地   (高中英语单词)
  • related [ri´leitid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.叙述的;有联系的   (高中英语单词)
  • rehearsal [ri´hə:səl] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.(使)排练;背诵   (英语四级单词)
  • homestead [´həumsted] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.家宅,宅基   (英语四级单词)
  • sojourn [´sɔdʒə:n] 移动到这儿单词发声  vi.&n.旅居;逗留   (英语四级单词)
  • preceding [pri(:)´si:diŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.在先的;前面的   (英语四级单词)
  • trying [´traiiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.难堪的;费劲的   (英语四级单词)
  • shortening [´ʃɔ:tniŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.缩短   (英语六级单词)
  • wrapping [´ræpiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.包装材料   (英语六级单词)
  • immemorial [,imi´mɔ:riəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.太古的,极古的   (英语六级单词)
  • vexation [vek´seiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.烦恼(的原因)   (英语六级单词)
  • extended [iks´tendid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.伸长的;广大的   (英语六级单词)
  • administrator [əd´ministreitə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.管理者,行政人员   (英语六级单词)

  • 上传人 欢乐鱼 分享于 2017-06-26 17:56:45
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