酷兔英语



THE LOST LADY OF LONE

By MRS. E.D.E.N. SOUTHWORTH

Author of "Nearest and Dearest," "The Hidden Hand," "Unknown,"

"Only a Girl's Heart," "For Woman's Love," etc.

1876

PUBLISHERS' NOTICE.

"THE LOST LADY OF LONE" is different from any of Mrs. Southworth's other

novels. The plot, which is unusually provocative of conjecture and

interest, is founded on thrilling and tragic events which occurred in the

domestic history of one of the most distinguished families in the

Highlands of Scotland. The materials which these interesting and tragic

annals place at the disposal of Mrs. Southworth give full scope to her

unrivalled skill in depicting character and developing a plot, and she

has made the most of her opportunity and her subject.

CONTENTS.

I. The bride of Lone

II. An ideal love

III. The ruined heir

IV. Salome's choice

V. Arondelle's consolation

VI. A horriblemystery on the wedding-day

VII. The morning's discovery

VIII. A horrible discovery

IX. After the discovery

X. The letter and its effect

XI. The vailed passenger

XII. The house on Westminster Road

XIII. A surprise for Mrs. Scott

XIV. The second bridal morn

XV. The cloud falls

XVI. Vanished

XVII. The lost Lady of Lone

XVIII. The flight of the duchess

XIX. Salome's refuge

XX. Salome's protectress

XXI. The bridegroom

XXII. At Lone

XXIII. A startling charge

XXIV. The vindication

XXV. Who was found?

XXVI. Off the track

XXVII. In the convent

XXVIII. The soul's struggle

XXIX. The stranger in the chapel

XXX. The haunter

XXXI. The abbess' story

XXXII. The duke's double

XXXIII. After the earthquake

XXXIV. Risen from the grave

XXXV. Face to face

XXXVI. A gathering storm

XXXVII. A sentence of banishment

XXXVIII. The storm bursts

XXXIX. The rivals

XL. After the storm

XLI. Father and son

XLII. Her son

XLIII. The duke's ward

XLIV. Retribution

XLV. After the revelation

XLVI. Retribution

XLVII. The end of a lost life

XLVIII. Husband and wife

THE LOST LADY OF LONE.

CHAPTER I.

THE BRIDE OF LONE.

"Eh, Meester McRath? Sae grand doings I hae na seen sin the day o' the

queen's visit to Lone. That wad be in the auld duke's time. And a waefu'

day it wa'."

"Dinna ye gae back to that day, Girzie Ross. It gars my blood boil only

to think o' it!"

"Na, Sandy, mon, sure the ill that was dune that day is weel compensate

on this. Sooth, if only marriages be made in heaven, as they say, sure

this is one. The laird will get his ain again, and the bonnyest leddy in

a' the land to boot."

"She _is_ a bonny lass, but na too gude for him, although her fair

hand does gie him back his lands."

"It's only a' just as it sud be."

"Na, it's no all as it sud be. Look at they fules trying to pit

up yon triumphal arch! The loons hae actuallygotten the motto

'HAPPINESS' set upside down, sae that a' the blooming red roses

are falling out o' it. An ill omen that if onything be an ill omen. I

maun rin and set it right."

The speakers in this short colloquy were Mrs. Girzie Ross, housekeeper,

and Mr. Alexander McRath, house-steward of Castle Lone.

The locality was in the Highlands of Scotland. The season was early

summer. The hour was near sunset. The scene was one of great beauty and

sublimity. The occasion one of high festivity and rejoicing.

The preparations were being completed for a grand event. For on the

morning of the next day a deep wrong was to be made right by the marriage

of the young and beautiful Lady of Lone to the chosen lord of her heart.

Lone Castle was a home of almost ideal grandeur and loveliness, situated

in one of the wildest and most picturesque regions of the Highlands, yet

brought to the utmostperfection of fertility by skillful cultivation.

The castle was originally the stronghold of a race of powerful and

warlike Scottish chieftains, ancestors of the illustrious ducal line of

Scott-Hereward. It was strongly built, on a rocky island, that arose from

The midst of a deep clear lake, surrounded by lofty mountains.

For generations past, the castle had been but a picturesque ruin, and the

island a barren desert, tenanted only by some old retainer of the ancient

family, who found shelter within its huge walls, and picked up a scanty

living by showing the famous ruins to artists and tourists.

But some years previous to the commencement of our story, when

Archibald-Alexander-John Scott succeeded his father, as seventh Duke of

Hereward, he conceived the magnificent, but most extravagant idea of

transforming that grim, old Highland fortress, perched upon its rocky

island, surrounded by water and walled in by mountains--into a mansion of

Paradise and a garden of Eden.

When he first spoke of his plan, he was called visionary and extravagant;

and when he persisted in carrying it into execution, he was called mad.

The most skillful engineers and architects in Europe were consulted and

their plans examined, and a selection of designs and contractors made

from the best among them. And then the restoration, or rather the

transfiguration, of the place was the labor of many years, at the cost

of much money.

Fabulous sums were lavished upon Lone. But the Duke's enthusiasm grew

as the work grew and the cost increased. All his unentailed estates in

England were first heavily mortgaged and afterwards sold, and the

proceeds swallowed up in the creation of Lone.

The duchess, inspired by her husband, was as enthusiastic as the duke.

When his resources were at an end and Lone unfinished she gave up her

marriage settlements, including her dower house, which was sold that the

proceeds might go to the completion of Lone.

But all this did not suffice to pay the stupendous cost.

Then the duke did the maddest act of his life. He raised the needed money

from usurers by giving them a mortgage on his own life estate in Lone

itself.

The work drew near to its completion.

In the meantime the duke's agents were ransacking the chief cities in

Europe in search of rare paintings, statues, vases, and other works of

art or articles of virtu to decorate the halls and chambers of Lone; for

which also the most famous manufacturers in France and Germany were

elaborating suitable designs in upholstery.

Every man directing every department of the works at Lone, whether as

engineer, architect, decorator, or furnisher, every man was an artist in

his own speciality. The work within and without was to be a perfect work

at whatever cost of time, money, and labor.

At length, at the end of ten years from its commencement, the work was

completed.

And for the sublimity of its scenery, the beauty of its grounds, the

almost tropical luxuriance of its gardens, the magnificence of its

buildings, the splendor of its decorations, and the luxury of its

appointments, Lone was unequalled.

What if the mad duke had nearly ruined himself in raising it?

Lone was henceforth the pride of engineers, the model of architects, the

subject of artists, the theme of poets, the Mecca of pilgrims, the eighth

wonder of the world.

Lone was opened for the first time a few weeks after its completion, on

the occasion of the coming of age of the duke's eldest son and heir, the

young Marquis of Arondelle, which fell upon the first of June.

A grand festival was held at Lone, and a great crowd assembled to do

honor to the anniversary. A noble and gentle company filled the halls and

chambers of the castle, and nearly all the Clan Scott assembled on the

grounds.

The festival was a grand triumph.

Among the thousands present were certain artists and reporters of the

press, and so it followed that the next issue of the _London News_

contained full-page pictures of Castle Lone and Inch Lone, with their

terraces, parterres, arches, arbors and groves; Loch Lone, with its

elegant piers, bridges and boats; and the surrounding mountains, with

their caves, grottoes, falls and fountains.

Yes, the birthday festival was a perfect triumph, and the fame of Lone

went forth to the uttermost ends of the earth. The English Colonists at

Australia, Cape of Good Hope, and New Zealand, read all about it in

copies of the _London News_, sent out to them by thoughtful London

friends. We remember the day, some years since, when we, sitting by our

cottage fire, read all about it in an illustrated paper, and pondered

over the happy fate of those who could live in paradise while still on

earth. Five years later, we would not have changed places with the

Duke of Hereward.

But this is a digression.

The duke was in his earthly heaven; but was the duke happy, or even

content?

Ah! no. He was overwhelmed with debt. Even Lone was mortgaged as deeply

as it could be--that is, as to the extent of the duke's own life

interests in the estate. Beyond that he could not burden the estate,

which was entailed upon his heirs male. Besides his financial

embarrassments, the duke was afflicted with another evil--he was

consumed with a fever too common with prince and with peasant, as well

as with peer--the fever of a land hunger.

The prince desires to add province to province; the peer to add manor to

manor; the peasant to own a little home of his own, and then to add acre

to acre.

The Lord of Lone glorying in his earthly paradise, wished to see it

enlarged, wished to add one estate to another until he should become

the largest land-owner in Scotland, or have his land-hunger appeased.

He bought up all the land adjoining Lone, that could be purchased at any

price, paying a little cash down, and giving notes for the balance on

each purchase. Thus, in the course of three years, Lone was nearly

doubled in territorial extent.

But the older creditors became clamorous. Bond, and mortgage holders

threatened foreclosure, and the financial affairs of the "mad duke,"

outwardly and apparently so prosperous, were really very desperate. The

family were seriously in danger of expulsion from Lone.

It was at this crisis that the devoted son came to the help of his

father--not wisely, as many people thought then--not fortunately, as it

turned out. To prevent his father from being compelled to leave Lone, and

to protect him from the persecution of creditors, the young Marquis of

Arondelle performed an act of self-sacrifice and filialdevotion seldom

equalled in the world's history. He renounced all his own entailed

rights, and sold all his prospective life interest in Lone. His was a

young, strong life, good for fifty or sixty years longer. His interest

brought a sum large enough to pay off the mortgage on Lone and to settle

all others of his father's outstanding debts.

Thus peaceable possession of Lone might have been secured to the family

during the natural life of the duke. At the demise of the duke, instead

of descending to his son and heir, it would pass into the possession of

other parties, with whom it would remain as long the heir should live.

Thus, I say, by the sacrifice of the son the peace of the father might

have been secured--for a time. And all might have gone well at Lone but

for one unlucky event which finally set the seal on the ruin of the ducal

family.

And yet that event was intended as an honor, and considered as an honor.

In a word the Queen, the Prince Consort, and the royal family, were

coming to the Highlands. And the Duke of Hereward received an intimation

that her majesty would stop on her royal progress and honor Lone with a

visit of two days. This was a distinction in no wise to be slighted by

any subject under any circumstances, and certainly not by the duke of

Hereward.

The Queen's visit would form the crowning glory of Lone. The chambers

occupied by majesty would henceforth be holy ground, and would be pointed

out with reverence to the stranger in all succeeding generations.

In anticipation of this honor the "mad" Duke of Hereward launched out

into his maddest extravagances.

He had but ten days in which to prepare for the royal visit, but he made

the best use of his time.

The guest chambers at Lone, already fitted up in princely magnificence,

had new splendors added to them. The castle and the grounds were adorned

and decorated with lavish expenditure. The lake was alive with

gayly-rigged boats. Triumphal arches were erected at stated intervals

of the drive leading from the public road, across the bridge connecting

the shore with the island, and--maddest extravagance of all--the ground

was laid out and fitted up for a grand tournament after the style of the

time of Richard Coeur de Lion, to be held there during the queen's

visit--that fatal visit spoken of in the early part of this chapter.

Yes, fatal!--for a hundred thousand pounds sterling, won by the son's

self-sacrifice, which should have gone to satisfy the clamorous creditors

of the duke, was squandered in extravagant preparations to royally

entertain England's expensive royal family.

A second time Lone was the scene of unparalleled display, festivity, and

rejoicing. Once more all the country round about was assembled there;

again the artists and reporters of the London press were among the crowd;

and again full-page pictures of the ceremonies attending the queen's

reception and entertainment were published in the illustrated papers, and

the fame of that royal visit went out to the uttermost parts of the

earth.

But mark this: Every footman that waited at the grand state-dinner table

was a bailiff in disguise, in charge of the plate and china, which,

together with all the fabulousriches of art, literature, science and


生词表:
  • hidden [´hid(ə)n] 移动到这儿单词发声  hide 的过去分词   (初中英语单词)
  • character [´kæriktə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.特性;性质;人物;字   (初中英语单词)
  • horrible [´hɔrəbəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.可怕的;恐怖的   (初中英语单词)
  • mystery [´mistəri] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.神秘;秘密;故弄玄虚   (初中英语单词)
  • flight [flait] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.逃走;飞行;班机   (初中英语单词)
  • sentence [´sentəns] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.判决 vt.宣判;处刑   (初中英语单词)
  • doings [´du:iŋz] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.行动;所作的事   (初中英语单词)
  • actually [´æktʃuəli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.事实上;实际上   (初中英语单词)
  • sunset [´sʌnset] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.日落;晚霞   (初中英语单词)
  • utmost [´ʌtməust] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.最大的 n.极端   (初中英语单词)
  • strongly [´strɔŋli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.强烈地;强有力地   (初中英语单词)
  • barren [´bærən] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.贫瘠的;不生育的   (初中英语单词)
  • previous [´pri:viəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.先,前,以前的   (初中英语单词)
  • magnificent [mæg´nifisənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.壮丽的;豪华的   (初中英语单词)
  • enthusiasm [in´θju:ziæzəm] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.热心;狂热;爱好   (初中英语单词)
  • creation [kri´eiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.创作;作品;创造   (初中英语单词)
  • estate [i´steit] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.财产;庄园;等级   (初中英语单词)
  • meantime [´mi:ntaim] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.&ad.其间;同时   (初中英语单词)
  • decorate [´dekəreit] 移动到这儿单词发声  vt.装饰;装修(房屋等)   (初中英语单词)
  • suitable [´su:təbəl, ´sju:-] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.合适的,适当的   (初中英语单词)
  • whatever [wɔt´evə] 移动到这儿单词发声  pron.&a.无论什么   (初中英语单词)
  • splendor [´splendə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.壮丽 =splendour   (初中英语单词)
  • luxury [´lʌkʃəri] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.奢侈(品);享受   (初中英语单词)
  • henceforth [´hens´fɔ:θ] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.今后;从今以后   (初中英语单词)
  • triumph [´traiəmf] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.胜利 vi.得胜,战胜   (初中英语单词)
  • paradise [´pærədais] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.天堂;乐园   (初中英语单词)
  • extent [ik´stent] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.长度;程度;范围   (初中英语单词)
  • prince [´prins] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.王子;亲王;君主   (初中英语单词)
  • peasant [´pezənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.农民;庄稼人   (初中英语单词)
  • province [´prɔvins] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.省;领域;范围   (初中英语单词)
  • financial [fi´nænʃəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.金融的,财政的   (初中英语单词)
  • prosperous [´prɔspərəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.繁荣的;顺利的   (初中英语单词)
  • desperate [´despərit] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.拼死的;绝望的   (初中英语单词)
  • seriously [´siəriəsli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.严肃;严重,重大   (初中英语单词)
  • devotion [di´vəuʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.献身;忠诚;热爱   (初中英语单词)
  • majesty [´mædʒisti] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.壮丽;崇高;尊严   (初中英语单词)
  • distinction [di´stiŋkʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.差别;特征;卓越   (初中英语单词)
  • spoken [´spəukən] 移动到这儿单词发声  speak的过去分词   (初中英语单词)
  • expensive [ik´spensiv] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.费钱的,昂贵的   (初中英语单词)
  • entertainment [,entə´teinmənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.招(款)待;联欢会   (初中英语单词)
  • disguise [dis´gaiz] 移动到这儿单词发声  vt.假装;隐瞒 n.伪装   (初中英语单词)
  • charge [tʃɑ:dʒ] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.收费;冲锋 n.费用   (初中英语单词)
  • riches [´ritʃiz] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.房地产;丰富   (初中英语单词)
  • literature [´litərətʃə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.文学;文献;著作   (初中英语单词)
  • tragic [´trædʒik] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.悲剧的;悲惨的   (高中英语单词)
  • distinguished [di´stiŋgwiʃt] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.卓越的,著名的   (高中英语单词)
  • disposal [di´spəuzəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.处理;支配   (高中英语单词)
  • startling [´stɑ:tliŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.惊人的   (高中英语单词)
  • locality [ləu´kæliti] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.位置,地区,发生地   (高中英语单词)
  • picturesque [,piktʃə´resk] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.似画的;别致的   (高中英语单词)
  • perfection [pə´fekʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.完美;极致;熟练   (高中英语单词)
  • skillful [´skilfəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.有技巧的;熟练的   (高中英语单词)
  • originally [ə´ridʒənəli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.本来;独创地   (高中英语单词)
  • illustrious [i´lʌstriəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.杰出的,显赫的   (高中英语单词)
  • extravagant [ik´strævəgənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.奢侈的;过度的   (高中英语单词)
  • highland [´hailənd] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.山地,高地   (高中英语单词)
  • fortress [´fɔ:tris] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.堡垒,要塞   (高中英语单词)
  • mansion [´mænʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.大厦;宅第;官邸   (高中英语单词)
  • execution [,eksi´kju:ʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.执行;演奏;表演   (高中英语单词)
  • selection [si´lekʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.选择;选拔;精选物   (高中英语单词)
  • restoration [,restə´reiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.恢复;复辟;重建(物)   (高中英语单词)
  • duchess [´dʌtʃis] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.公爵夫人;女公爵   (高中英语单词)
  • enthusiastic [inθju:zi´æstik] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.热情的,热心的   (高中英语单词)
  • suffice [sə´fais] 移动到这儿单词发声  vt.使满足 vi.足够   (高中英语单词)
  • mortgage [´mɔ:gidʒ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.&vt.抵押   (高中英语单词)
  • architect [´ɑ:kitekt] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.建筑师   (高中英语单词)
  • scenery [´si:nəri] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.舞台布景   (高中英语单词)
  • tropical [´trɔpikəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.热带地区的   (高中英语单词)
  • eldest [´eldist] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.最年长的   (高中英语单词)
  • marquis [´mɑ:kwis] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.侯爵   (高中英语单词)
  • festival [´festivəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.节日;庆祝;欢庆   (高中英语单词)
  • surrounding [sə´raundiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.周围的事物   (高中英语单词)
  • thoughtful [´θɔ:tfəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.深思的;体贴的   (高中英语单词)
  • earthly [´ə:θli] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.地球的;世俗的   (高中英语单词)
  • apparently [ə´pærəntli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.显然,表面上地   (高中英语单词)
  • crisis [´kraisis] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.转折点;危机   (高中英语单词)
  • wisely [´waizli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.明智地,聪明地   (高中英语单词)
  • fortunately [´fɔ:tʃənətli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.幸运地   (高中英语单词)
  • outstanding [aut´stændiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.突出的;显著的   (高中英语单词)
  • peaceable [´pi:səbl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.和平的;安静的   (高中英语单词)
  • reverence [´revərəns] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.尊敬;敬畏;尊严   (高中英语单词)
  • expenditure [ik´spenditʃə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.消费;经费;费用   (高中英语单词)
  • tournament [´tuənəmənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.比赛,锦标赛   (高中英语单词)
  • unusually [ʌn´ju:ʒuəli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.异常地;非常   (英语四级单词)
  • conjecture [kən´dʒektʃə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.&v.猜测(想);设想   (英语四级单词)
  • bridal [´braidl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.&n.婚礼(的)   (英语四级单词)
  • gathering [´gæðəriŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.集会,聚集   (英语四级单词)
  • trying [´traiiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.难堪的;费劲的   (英语四级单词)
  • gotten [´gɔtn] 移动到这儿单词发声  get的过去分词   (英语四级单词)
  • upside [´ʌpsaid] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.上边,上段,上部   (英语四级单词)
  • blooming [´blu:miŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.正开花的;妙龄的   (英语四级单词)
  • grandeur [´grændʒə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.伟大;富丽;壮观   (英语四级单词)
  • loveliness [´lʌvlinis] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.美丽,可爱   (英语四级单词)
  • stronghold [´strɔŋhəuld] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.要塞;根据地   (英语四级单词)
  • scottish [´skɔtiʃ, ´skɑtiʃ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.&n.苏格兰人(的)   (英语四级单词)
  • unfinished [´ʌn´finiʃt] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.未完成的,未完工的   (英语四级单词)
  • completion [kəm´pli:ʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.完成;完整   (英语四级单词)
  • magnificence [mæg´nifisns] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.壮丽;宏伟;豪华   (英语四级单词)
  • anniversary [,æni´və:səri] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.周年纪念(日)   (英语四级单词)
  • devoted [di´vəutid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.献身…的,忠实的   (英语四级单词)
  • persecution [,pə:si´kju:ʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.迫害;残害;困扰   (英语四级单词)
  • prospective [prə´spektiv] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.预期的;未来的   (英语四级单词)
  • unlucky [ʌn´lʌki] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.倒霉的,不幸的   (英语四级单词)
  • consort [´kɔnsɔ:t] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.&v.配偶;合作;一致   (英语四级单词)
  • anticipation [æn,tisi´peiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.预期;预料;期望   (英语四级单词)
  • princely [´prinsli] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.王候般的;高贵的   (英语四级单词)
  • lavish [´læviʃ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.慷慨的;浪费的   (英语四级单词)
  • bridge [bridʒ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.桥(梁);鼻梁;桥牌   (英语四级单词)
  • extravagance [iks´trævigəns] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.奢侈;极端   (英语四级单词)
  • sterling [´stə:liŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.真正的 n.英国货币   (英语四级单词)
  • triumphal [trai´ʌmfəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.凯旋的   (英语六级单词)
  • festivity [fe´stiviti] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.节日;喜庆日;庆祝   (英语六级单词)
  • fertility [fə:´tiliti] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.肥沃;多产;繁殖力   (英语六级单词)
  • commencement [kə´mensmənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.开始;毕业典礼(日)   (英语六级单词)
  • stupendous [stju:´pendəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.惊人的;伟大的   (英语六级单词)
  • uttermost [´ʌtəməust] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.&n.=utmost   (英语六级单词)
  • territorial [,teri´tɔ:riəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.领地的;区域的   (英语六级单词)
  • clamorous [´klæmərəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.喧闹的;吵吵嚷嚷的   (英语六级单词)
  • expulsion [ik´spʌlʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.驱逐;开除;排气   (英语六级单词)
  • filial [´filiəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.子女的;孝顺的   (英语六级单词)
  • footman [´futmən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.侍应员;男仆   (英语六级单词)
  • fabulous [´fæbjuləs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.难以置信的;惊人的   (英语六级单词)

  • 上传人 欢乐鱼 分享于 2017-06-26 17:52:38
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