酷兔英语



THE ADVENTURES OF BOBBY ORDE

OTHER BOOKS BY THE SAME AUTHOR

THE CLAIM JUMPERS

THE WESTERNERS

THE BLAZED TRAIL

BLAZED TRAIL STORIES

THE MAGIC FOREST

CONJUROR'S HOUSE

THE SILENT PLACES

THE FOREST

THE MOUNTAINS

THE PASS

CAMP AND TRAIL

THE RIVERMAN

ARIZONA NIGHTS

With Samuel Hopkins Adams

THE MYSTERY

[Illustration: "ALWAYS REMEMBER THAT A TRUE SPORTSMAN IN EVERY WAY IS

ABOUT THE SCARCEST THING THEY MAKE--AND THE FINEST. SO NATURALLY THE

COMMON RUN OF PEOPLE DON'T LIVE UP TO IT. IF _you_--NOT THE THINKING

YOU, NOR EVEN THE CONSCIENCE YOU, BUT THE WAY-DOWN-DEEP-IN-YOUR-HEART

_you_ THAT YOU CAN'T FOOL NOR TRICK NOR LIE TO--IF THAT _you_ IS

SATISFIED, IT'S ALL RIGHT."]

THE ADVENTURES OF

BOBBY ORDE

BY

STEWART EDWARD WHITE

[Illustration]

ILLUSTRATED BY WORTH BREHM

NEW YORK

GROSSET & DUNLAP

PUBLISHERS

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, INCLUDING THAT OF TRANSLATION

INTO FOREIGN LANGUAGES, INCLUDING THE SCANDINAVIAN

COPYRIGHT, 1911, BY DOUBLEDAY, PAGE & COMPANY

COPYRIGHT, 1908, 1909,

BY THE PHILLIPS PUBLISHING COMPANY

CONTENTS

CHAPTER PAGE

I. THE BOOMS 3

II. THE PICNIC 36

III. HIDE AND COOP 67

IV. THE PRINTING PRESS 81

V. THE LITTLE GIRL 91

VI. THE LITTLE GIRL (_Continued_) 103

VII. UNTIL THE LAST SHOT 115

VIII. THE FLOBERT RIFLE 140

IX. MR. DAGGETT 150

X. THE SPORTSMAN'S ASSOCIATION 160

XI. THE MARSHES 167

XII. THE TRESPASSERS 209

XIII. THE PLAYMATES 221

XIV. THE SHOOTING CLUB 235

XV. THE UPPER ROOMS 239

XVI. THE THIRD STORY 243

XVII. "SLIDING DOWN HILL" 247

XVIII. CHRISTMAS 262

XIX. THE BOXING MATCH 284

XX. THE PARTNERS 292

XXI. WINTER 298

XXII. THE MURDER 304

XXIII. THE TRIAL 317

XXIV. THE TRIAL (_Continued_) 322

XXV. THE HOLE IN THE CAP 326

XXVI. THE SIXTEEN-GAUGE SHOTGUN 332

XXVII. THE SPORTSMAN 337

THE ADVENTURES OF BOBBY ORDE

I

THE BOOMS

At nine o'clock one morning Bobby Orde, following an agreement with his

father, walked sedately to the Proper Place, where he kept his cap and

coat and other belongings. The Proper Place was a small, dark closet

under the angle of the stairs. He called it the Proper Place just as he

called his friend Clifford Fuller, or the saw-mill town in which he

lived Monrovia--because he had always heard it called so.

At the door a beautiful black and white setter solemnly joined him.

"Hullo, Duke!" greeted Bobby.

The dog swept back and forth his magnificentfeather tail, and fell in

behind his young master.

Bobby knew the way perfectly. You went to the fire-engine house; and

then to the left after the court-house was Mr. Proctor's; and then, all

at once, the town. Father's office was in the nearest square brick

block. Bobby paused, as he always did, to look in the first store

window. In it was a weapon which he knew to be a Flobert Rifle. It was

something to be dreamed of, with its beautiful blued-steel octagon

barrel, its gleaming gold-plated locks and its polished stock. Bobby was

just under ten years old; but he could have told you all about that

Flobert Rifle--its weight, the length of its barrel, the number of

grains of both powder and lead loaded in its various cartridges. Among

his books he possessed a catalogue that described Flobert Rifles, and

also Shotguns and Revolvers. Bobby intoxicated himself with them. Twice

he had even seen his father's revolver; and he knew where it was

kept--on the top shelf of the closet. The very closet door gave him a

thrill.

Reluctantly he tore himself away, and turned in to the straight, broad

stairway that led to the offices above. The stairway, and the hall to

which it mounted were dark and smelled of old coco-matting and stale

tobacco. Bobby liked this smell very much. He liked, too, the echo of

his footsteps as he marched down the hall to the door of his father's

offices.

Within were several long, narrow desks burdened with large ledgers and

flanked by high stools. On each stool sat a clerk--five of them. An

iron "base burner" stove occupied the middle of the room. Its pipe ran

in suspension here and there through the upper air until it plunged

unexpectedly into the wall. A capacious wood-box flanked it. Bobby was

glad he did not have to fill that wood-box at a cent a time.

Against the walls at either end of the room and next the windows were

two roll-top desks at which sat Mr. Orde and his partner. Two or three

pivoted chairs completed the furnishings.

"Hullo, Bobby," called Mr. Orde, who was talking earnestly to a man;

"I'll be ready in a few minutes."

Nothing pleased Bobby more than to wander about the place with its

delicious "office smell." At one end of the room, nailed against the

wall, were rows and rows of beautifully polished models of the firm's

different tugs, barges and schooners. Bobby surveyed them with both

pleasure and regret. It seemed a shame that such delightful boats should

have been built only in half and nailed immovably to boards. Against

another wall were maps, and a real deer's head. Everywhere hung framed

photographs of logging camps and lumbering operations. From any one of

the six long windows he could see the street below, and those who passed

along it. Time never hung heavy at the office.

When Mr. Orde had finished his business, he put on his hat, and the big

man, the little boy and the grave, black and white setter dog walked

down the long dark hall, down the steps, and around the corner to the

livery stable.

Here they climbed into one of the light and graceful buggies which were

at that time a source of such pride to their owners, and flashed out

into the street behind Mr. Orde's celebrated team.

Duke's gravity at this juncture deserted him completely. Life now meant

something besides duty. Ears back, mouth wide, body extended, he flew

away. Faster and faster he ran, until he was almost out of sight; then

turned with a whirl of shingle dust and came racing back. When he

reached the horses he leaped vigorously from one side to the other,

barking ecstatically; then set off on a long even lope along the

sidewalks and across the street, investigating everything.

Mr. Orde took the slender whalebone whip from its socket.

"Come, Dick!" said he.

The team laid back their pointeddelicate ears, shook their heads from

side to side, snorted and settled into a swift stride. Bobby leaned over

to watch the sunlighttwinkle on the wheel-spokes. The narrow tires sunk

slightly in the yielding shingle fragments. _Brittle!_ _Brittle!_

_Brittle!_ the sound said to Bobby. Above all things he loved to watch

the gossamer-like wheels, apparently too light and delicate to bear the

weight they must carry, flying over the springy road.

At the edge of town they ran suddenly out from beneath the maple trees

to find themselves at the banks of the river. A long bridge crossed it.

The team clattered over the planks so fast that hardly could Bobby get

time to look at the cat-tails along the bayous before blue water was

beneath him.

But here Mr. Orde had to pull up. The turn-bridge was open; and Bobby to

his delight was allowed to stand up in his seat and watch the wallowing,

churning little tug and the three calm ships pass through. He could not

see the tug at all until it had gone beyond the bridge, only its smoke;

but the masts of the ship passed stately in regular succession.

"Three-masted schooner," said he.

Then when the last mast had scarcely cleared the opening, the ponderous

turn-bridge began slowly to close. Its movement was almost

imperceptible, but mighty beyond Bobby's small experience to gauge. He

could make out the two bridge tenders walking around and around, pushing

on the long lever that operated the mechanism. In a moment more the

bridge came into alignment with a clang. The team, tossing their heads

impatiently, moved forward.

On the other side of the bridge was no more town; but instead, great

lumber yards, and along the river a string of mills with many

smokestacks.

The road-bed at this point changed abruptly to sawdust, springy and

odorous with the sweet new smell of pine that now perfumed all the air.

To the left Bobby could see the shipyards and the skeleton of a vessel

well under way. From it came the irregular _Block!_ _Block!_ _Block!_ of

mallets; and it swarmed with the little, black, ant-like figures of men.

Mr. Orde drove rapidly and silently between the shipyards and the rows

and rows of lumber piles, arranged in streets and alleys like an

untenanted city. Overhead ran tramways on which dwelt cars and great

black and bay horses. The wild exultant shriek of the circular saw rang

out. White plumes of steam shot up against the intense blue of the sky.

Beyond the piles of lumber Bobby could make out the topmasts of more

ships, from which floated the pointed hollow "tell-tales" affected by

the lake schooners of those days as pennants. At the end of the lumber

piles the road turned sharp to the right. It passed in turn the small

building which Bobby knew to be another delightful office, and the huge

cavernous mill with its shrieks and clangs, its blazing, winking eyes

beneath and its long incline up which the dripping, sullen logs crept in

unending procession to their final disposition. And then came the

"booms" or pens, in which the logs floated like a patterned brown

carpet. Men with pike poles were working there; and even at a distance

Bobby caught the dip and rise, and the flash of white water as the

rivermen ran here and there over the unstable footing.

Next were more lumber yards and more mills, for five miles or so, until

at last they emerged into an open, flat country, divided by the

old-fashioned snake fences; dotted with blackened stumps of the

long-vanished forest; eaten by sloughs and bayous from the river. The

sawdust ceased. Bobby leaned out to watch with fascinated interest the

sand, divided by the tire, flowing back in a beautiful curved V to cover

the wheel-rim.

As far as the eye could reach were marshes grown with wild rice and

cat-tails. Occasionally one of these bayous would send an arm in to

cross the road. Then Bobby was delighted, for that meant a float-bridge

through the cracks of which the water spurted up in jets at each impact

of the horses' hoofs. On either hand the bayou, but a plank's thickness

below the level of the float-bridge, filmed with green weeds and the

bright scum of water, not too stagnant, offered surprises to the

watchful eye. One could see many mud-turtles floating lazily, feet

outstretched in poise; and bullfrogs and little frogs; and, in the clear

places, trim and self-sufficient mud hens. From the reeds at the edges

flapped small green herons and thunder pumpers. And at last----

"Oh, look, papa!" cried Bobby excited and awed. "There's a snap'n'

turtle!"

Indeed, there he was in plain sight, the boys' monster of the marshes,

fully two feet in diameter, his rough shell streaming with long green

grasses, his wicked black eyes staring, his hooked, powerful jaws set in

a grim curve. If once those jaws clamped--so said the boys--nothing

could loose them but the sound of thunder, not even cutting off the

head.

Ten of the twelve miles to the booms had already been passed. The horses

continued to step out freely, making nothing of the light fabric they

drew after them. Duke, the white of his coat soiled and muddied by

frequent and grateful plunges, loped alongside, his pink tongue hanging

from one corner of his mouth, and a seraphic expression on his

countenance. Occasionally he rolled his eyes up at his masters in sheer

enjoyment of the expedition.

"Papa," asked Bobby suddenly, "what makes you have the booms so far

away? Why don't you have them down by the bridge?"

Mr. Orde glanced down at his son. The boy looked very little and very

childish, with his freckled, dull red cheeks, his dot of a nose, and his

wide gray eyes. The man was about to make some stop-gap reply. He

checked himself.

"It's this way Bobby," he explained carefully. "The logs are cut 'way up

the river--ever so far--and then they float down the river. Now,

everybody has logs in the river--Mr. Proctor and Mr. Heinzman and Mr.

Welton and lots of people, and they're all mixed up together. When they

get down to the mills where they are to be sawed up into boards, the

logs belonging to the different owners have to be sorted out. Papa's

company is paid by all the others to do the floating down stream and the

sorting out. The sorting out is done in the booms; and we put the booms

up stream from the mills because it is easier to float the logs, after

they have been sorted, down the stream than to haul them back up the

stream."

"What do you have them so far up the stream for?" asked Bobby.

"Because there's more room--the river widens out there."

Bobby said nothing for some time, and Mr. Orde confessed within himself

a strong doubt as to whether or not the explanation had been understood.

"Papa," demanded Bobby, "I don't see how you tell your logs from Mr.

Proctor's or Mr. Heinzman's or any of the rest of them."

Mr. Orde turned, extending his hand heartily to his astonished son.

"You're all right, Bobby!" said he. "Why, you see, each log is stamped

on the end with a mark. Mr. Proctor's mark is one thing; and Mr.

Heinzman's is another; and all the rest have different ones."

"I see," said Bobby.

The road now led them through a small grove of willows. Emerging thence


生词表:
  • sportsman [´spɔ:tsmən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.运动员;好运动的人   (初中英语单词)
  • conscience [´kɔnʃəns] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.良心;道德心   (初中英语单词)
  • boxing [´bɔksiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.拳击运动   (初中英语单词)
  • agreement [ə´gri:mənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.同意;一致;协议   (初中英语单词)
  • magnificent [mæg´nifisənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.壮丽的;豪华的   (初中英语单词)
  • feather [´feðə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.羽毛   (初中英语单词)
  • weapon [´wepən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.武器;斗争手段   (初中英语单词)
  • barrel [´bærəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.(琵琶)桶;圆筒   (初中英语单词)
  • closet [´klɔzit] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.橱;私室;盥洗室   (初中英语单词)
  • partner [´pɑ:tnə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.伙伴 v.同….合作   (初中英语单词)
  • wander [´wɔndə, ´wɑ:n:dər] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.徘徊;流浪   (初中英语单词)
  • delightful [di´laitful] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.讨人喜欢的   (初中英语单词)
  • lumbering [´lʌmbəriŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.伐木(业)   (初中英语单词)
  • graceful [´greisfəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.优美的,流畅的   (初中英语单词)
  • celebrated [´selibreitid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.著名的   (初中英语单词)
  • slender [´slendə] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.细长的;微薄的   (初中英语单词)
  • pointed [´pɔintid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.尖(锐)的;中肯的   (初中英语单词)
  • delicate [´delikət] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.精美的;微妙的   (初中英语单词)
  • sunlight [´sʌnlait] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.日光   (初中英语单词)
  • twinkle [´twiŋkl] 移动到这儿单词发声  vi.&n.闪烁;眨眼   (初中英语单词)
  • opening [´əupəniŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.开放;开端 a.开始的   (初中英语单词)
  • movement [´mu:vmənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.活动;运动;动作   (初中英语单词)
  • abruptly [ə´brʌptli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.突然地;粗鲁地   (初中英语单词)
  • silently [´sailəntli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.寂静地;沉默地   (初中英语单词)
  • lumber [´lʌmbə] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.伐木 n.木材   (初中英语单词)
  • overhead [´əuvə,hed] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.当头 a.在头上的   (初中英语单词)
  • shriek [ʃri:k] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.&n.尖叫(声)   (初中英语单词)
  • circular [´sə:kjulə] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.圆形的 n.通知   (初中英语单词)
  • incline [in´klain] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.(使)倾斜 n.斜坡   (初中英语单词)
  • procession [prə´seʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.队伍 v.列队行进   (初中英语单词)
  • disposition [,dispə´ziʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.安排;性情;倾向   (初中英语单词)
  • working [´wə:kiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.工人的;劳动的   (初中英语单词)
  • occasionally [ə´keiʒənəli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.偶然地;非经常地   (初中英语单词)
  • thunder [´θʌndə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.雷 vi.打雷 vt.吼出   (初中英语单词)
  • monster [´mɔnstə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.怪物 a.大得异常的   (初中英语单词)
  • wicked [´wikid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.邪恶的;不道德的   (初中英语单词)
  • hooked [hukt] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.钩状的;上瘾的   (初中英语单词)
  • freely [´fri:li] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.自由地;慷慨地   (初中英语单词)
  • fabric [´fæbrik] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.织物;结构;组织   (初中英语单词)
  • grateful [´greitful] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.感谢的;令人愉快的   (初中英语单词)
  • stream [stri:m] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.河 vi.流出;飘扬   (初中英语单词)
  • explanation [,eksplə´neiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.解释;说明;辩解   (初中英语单词)
  • thence [ðens] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.从那里;因此   (初中英语单词)
  • picnic [´piknik] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.郊游 vi.(去)野餐   (高中英语单词)
  • solemnly [´sɔləmli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.严肃地,庄严地   (高中英语单词)
  • perfectly [´pə:fiktli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.理想地;完美地   (高中英语单词)
  • catalogue [´kætəlɔg] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.一览表 v.编目,归类   (高中英语单词)
  • earnestly [´ə:nistli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.认真地;急切地   (高中英语单词)
  • gravity [´græviti] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.严肃;严重;重力   (高中英语单词)
  • stride [straid] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.进展 v.跨过;骑   (高中英语单词)
  • apparently [ə´pærəntli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.显然,表面上地   (高中英语单词)
  • stately [´steitli] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.庄严的,雄伟的   (高中英语单词)
  • mighty [´maiti] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.强有力的 ad.很   (高中英语单词)
  • skeleton [´skelitən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.骨骼;骷髅   (高中英语单词)
  • irregular [i´regjulə] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.不规则的;不正当的   (高中英语单词)
  • intense [in´tens] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.强烈的;紧张的   (高中英语单词)
  • sullen [´sʌlən] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.不高兴的   (高中英语单词)
  • diameter [dai´æmitə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.直径   (高中英语单词)
  • alongside [əlɔŋ´said] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.在旁 prep.横靠   (高中英语单词)
  • heartily [´hɑ:tili] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.衷心地;亲切地   (高中英语单词)
  • belongings [bi´lɔŋiŋz] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.所有物;行李   (英语四级单词)
  • revolver [ri´vɔlvə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.左轮手枪;旋转者   (英语四级单词)
  • stairway [´steəwei] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.楼梯   (英语四级单词)
  • suspension [sə´spenʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.吊;中止;暂停   (英语四级单词)
  • beautifully [´bju:tifəli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.美丽地;优美地   (英语四级单词)
  • shingle [´ʃiŋgəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.盖屋板;木瓦   (英语四级单词)
  • vigorously [´vigərəsli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.精力旺盛地;健壮地   (英语四级单词)
  • bridge [bridʒ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.桥(梁);鼻梁;桥牌   (英语四级单词)
  • mechanism [´mekənizəm] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.机械装置;机制   (英语四级单词)
  • delighted [di´laitid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.高兴的;喜欢的   (英语四级单词)
  • freckled [´frekld] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.有雀斑的,有斑点的   (英语四级单词)
  • capacious [kə´peiʃəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.广阔的;容积大的   (英语六级单词)
  • extended [iks´tendid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.伸长的;广大的   (英语六级单词)
  • affected [ə´fektid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.做作的;假装的   (英语六级单词)
  • stagnant [´stægnənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.停滞的;萧条的   (英语六级单词)
  • lazily [´leizili] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.懒惰地,慢吞吞地   (英语六级单词)

  • 上传人 欢乐鱼 分享于 2017-06-26 17:43:33
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