酷兔英语



FRANK AND ARCHIE SERIES

* * * * *

FRANK

THE YOUNG NATURALIST

BY

HARRY CASTLEMON,

AUTHOR OF "THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN SERIES,"

"THE GO-AHEAD SERIES," ETC.

1892

[Illustration]

THE GUN-BOAT SERIES.

FRANK, THE YOUNG NATURALIST,

FRANK ON A GUN-BOAT,

FRANK IN THE WOODS,

FRANK ON THE PRAIRIE,

FRANK BEFORE VICKSBURG,

FRANK ON THE LOWER MISSISSIPPI.

CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.

THE HOME OF THE YOUNG NATURALIST

CHAPTER II.

AN UGLY CUSTOMER

CHAPTER III.

THE MUSEUM

CHAPTER IV.

A RACE ON THE WATER

CHAPTER V.

A FISHING EXCURSION

CHAPTER VI.

THE REGULATORS

CHAPTER VII.

THE REVENGE

CHAPTER VIII.

HOW TO SPEND THE "FOURTH"

CHAPTER IX.

THE COAST-GUARDS OUTWITTED

CHAPTER X.

A QUEER COURSE

CHAPTER XI.

TROUT-FISHING

CHAPTER XII.

A DUCK-HUNT ON THE WATER

CHAPTER XIII.

A 'COON-HUNT

CHAPTER XIV.

BILL LAWSON'S REVENGE

CHAPTER XV.

WILD GEESE

CHAPTER XVI.

A CHAPTER OF INCIDENTS

CHAPTER XVII.

THE GRAYHOUND OUTGENERALED

FRANK, THE YOUNG NATURALIST.

* * * * *

CHAPTER I.

THE HOME OF THE YOUNG NATURALIST.

About one hundred miles north of Augusta, the Capital of Maine, the

little village of Lawrence is situated. A range of high hills skirts

its western side, and stretches away to the north as far as the eye

can reach; while before the village, toward the east, flows the

Kennebec River.

Near the base of the hills a beautiful stream, known as Glen's Creek,

has its source; and, after winding through the adjacent meadows, and

reaching almost around the village, finally empties into the Kennebec.

Its waters are deep and clear, and flow over a rough, gravelly bed,

and under high banks, and through many a little nook where the perch

and sunfish love to hide. This creek, about half a mile from its

mouth, branches off, forming two streams, the smaller of which flows

south, parallel with the river for a short distance, and finally

empties into it. This stream is known as Ducks' Creek, and it is very

appropriately named; for, although it is but a short distance from the

village, every autumn, and until late in the spring, its waters are

fairly alive with wild ducks, which find secure retreats among the

high bushes and reeds which line its banks. The island formed by these

two creeks is called Reynard's Island, from the fact that for several

years a sly old fox had held possession of it in spite of the efforts

of the village boys to capture him. The island contains, perhaps,

twenty-five acres, and is thickly covered with hickory-trees; and

there is an annualstrife between the village boys and the squirrels,

to see which can gather the greater quantity of nuts.

Directly opposite the village, near the middle of the river, is

another island, called Strawberry Island, from the great quantity of

that fruit which it produces.

The fishing-grounds about the village are excellent. The river affords

great numbers of perch, black bass, pike, and muscalonge; and the

numberless little streams that intersect the country fairly swarm with

trout, and the woods abound in game. This attracts sportsmen from

other places; and the _Julia Burton_, the little steamer that plies up

and down the river, frequently brings large parties of amateur

hunters and fishermen, who sometimes spend months enjoying the rare

sport.

It was on the banks of Glen's Creek, about half a mile from the

village, in a neat little cottage that stood back from the road, and

which was almost concealed by the thick shrubbery and trees that

surrounded it, that FRANK NELSON, the young naturalist, lived. His

father had been a wealthy merchant in the city of Boston; and, after

his death, Mrs. Nelson had removed into the country with her children,

and bought the place of which we are speaking. Frank was a handsome,

high-spirited boy, about sixteen years of age. He was kind,

open-hearted, and generous; and no one in the village had more friends

than he. But his most prominentcharacteristic was perseverance. He

was a slow thinker, and some, perhaps, at first sight, would have

pronounced him "dull;" but the unyielding application with which he

devoted himself to his studies, or to any thing else he undertook,

overcame all obstacles; and he was further advanced, and his knowledge

was more thorough than that of any other boy of the same age in the

village. He never gave up any thing he undertook because he found it

more difficult than he had expected, or hurried over it in a

"slipshod" manner, for his motto was, "Whatever is worth doing at all,

is worth doing well."

At the time of which we write Frank was just entering upon what he

called a "long vacation." He had attended the high-school of which the

village boasted for nearly eight years, with no intermission but the

vacations, and during this time he had devoted himself with untiring

energy to his studies. He loved his books, and they were his constant

companions. By intenseapplication he succeeded in working his way

into the highest class in school, which was composed of young men much

older than himself, and who looked upon him, not as a fellow-student,

but as a rival, and used every exertion to prevent him from keeping

pace with them. But Frank held his own in spite of their efforts, and

not unfrequently paid them back in their own coin by committing his

lessons more thoroughly than they.

Things went on so for a considerable time. Frank, whose highest

ambition was to be called the best scholar in his class, kept steadily

gaining ground, and one by one the rival students were overtaken and

distanced. But Frank had some smart scholars matched against him, and

he knew that the desired reputation was not to be obtained without a

fierce struggle; and every moment, both in and out of school, was

devoted to study.

He had formerly been passionately fond of rural sports, hunting and

fishing, but now his fine double-barrel gun, which he had always taken

especial care to keep in the best possible "shooting order," hung in

its accustomed place, all covered with dust. His fishing-rod and

basket were in the same condition; and Bravo, his fine hunting-dog,

which was very much averse to a life of inactivity, made use of his

most eloquent whines in vain.

At last Frank's health began to fail rapidly. His mother was the first

to notice it, and at the suggestion of her brother, who lived in

Portland, she decided to take Frank out of school for at least one

year, and allow him but two hours each day for study. Perhaps some of

our young readers would have been very much pleased at the thought of

so long a respite from the tiresome duties of school; but it was a

severe blow to Frank. A few more months, he was confident, would have

carried him ahead of all competitors. But he always submitted to his

mother's requirements, no matter how much at variance with his own

wishes, without murmuring; and when the spring term was ended he took

his books under his arm, and bade a sorrowfulfarewell to his

much-loved school-room.

It is June, and as Frank has been out of school almost two months,

things begin to wear their old, accustomed look again. The young

naturalist's home, as his schoolmates were accustomed to say, is a

"regular curiosity shop." Perhaps, reader, if we take a stroll about

the premises, we can find something to interest us.

Frank's room, which he called his "study," is in the south wing of the

cottage. It has two windows, one looking out toward the road, and the

other covered with a thick blind of climbing roses, which almost shut

out the light. A bookcase stands beside one of the windows, and if you

were to judge from the books it contained, you would pronounce Frank

quite a literary character. The two upper shelves are occupied by

miscellaneous books, such as Cooper's novels, Shakspeare's works, and

the like. On the next two shelves stand Frank's choicest

books--natural histories; there are sixteen large volumes, and he

knows them almost by heart. The drawers in the lower part of the case

are filled on one side with writing materials, and on the other with

old compositions, essays, and orations, some of which exhibit a power

of imagination and a knowledge of language hardly to be expected in a

boy of Frank's age. On the top of the case, at either end, stand the

busts of Clay and Webster, and between them are two relics of

Revolutionary times, a sword and musket crossed, with the words

"Bunker Hill" printed on a slip of paper fastened to them. On the

opposite side of the room stands a bureau, the drawers of which are

filled with clothing, and on the top are placed two beautiful

specimens of Frank's handiwork. One is a model of a "fore-and-aft"

schooner, with whose rigging or hull the most particular tar could not

find fault. The other represents a "scene at sea." It is inclosed in a

box about two feet long and a foot and a half in hight. One side of

the box is glass, and through it can be seen two miniature vessels.

The craft in the foreground would be known among sailors as a "Jack."

She is neither a brig nor a bark, but rather a combination of both.

She is armed, and the cannon can be seen protruding from her

port-holes. Every sail is set, and she seems to be making great

exertion to escape from the other vessel, which is following close in

her wake. The flag which floats at her peak, bearing the sign of the

"skull and cross-bones," explains it all: the "Jack" is a pirate; and

you could easily tell by the long, low, black hull, and tall, raking

masts that her pursuer is a revenue cutter. The bottom of the box, to

which the little vessels are fastened in such a manner that they

appear to "heel" under the pressure of their canvas, is cut out in

little hollows, and painted blue, with white caps, to resemble the

waves of the ocean; while a thick, black thunder-cloud, which is

painted on the sides of the box, and appears to be rising rapidly,

with the lightning playing around its ragged edges, adds greatly to

the effect of the scene.

At the north end of the room stands a case similar to the one in which

Frank keeps his books, only it is nearly twice as large. It is filled

with stuffed "specimens"--birds, nearly two hundred in number. There

are bald eagles, owls, sparrows, hawks, cranes, crows, a number of

different species of ducks, and other water-fowl; in short, almost

every variety of the featheredcreation that inhabited the woods

around Lawrence is here represented.

At the other end of the room stands a bed concealed by curtains.

Before it is a finely carved wash-stand, on which are a pitcher and

bowl, and a towel nicely folded lies beside them. In the corner, at

the foot of the bed, is what Frank called his "sporting cabinet." A

frame has been erected by placing two posts against the wall, about

four feet apart; and three braces, pieces of board about six inches

wide, and long enough to reach from one post to the other, are

fastened securely to them. On the upper brace a fine jointed

fish-pole, such as is used in "heavy" fishing, protected by a neat,

strong bag of drilling, rests on hooks which have been driven securely

into the frame; and from another hook close by hangs a large

fish-basket which Frank, who is a capital fisherman, has often brought

in filled with the captured denizens of the river or some favorite

trout-stream. On the next lower brace hang a powder-flask and

shot-pouch and a double-barrel shot-gun, the latter protected from the

damp and dust by a thick, strong covering. On the lower brace hang the

clothes the young naturalist always wears when he goes hunting or

fishing--a pair of sheep's-gray pantaloons, which will resist water

and dirt to the last extremity, a pair of long boots, a blue

flannel-shirt, such as is generally worn by the sailors, and an

India-rubber coat and cap for rainy weather. A shelf has been fastened

over the frame, and on this stands a tin box, which Frank calls his

"fishing-box." It is divided into apartments, which are filled with

fish-hooks, sinkers, bobbers, artificial flies, spoon-hooks, reels,

and other tackle, all kept in the nicest order.

Frank had one sister, but no brothers. Her name was Julia. She was ten

years of age; and no boy ever had a lovelier sister. Like her brother,

she was unyielding in perseverance, but kind and trusting in

disposition, willing to be told her faults that she might correct

them. Mrs. Nelson was a woman of good, sound sense; always required

implicit obedience of her children; never flattered them, nor allowed

others to do so if she could prevent it. The only other inmate of the

house was Aunt Hannah, as the children called her. She had formerly

been a slave in Virginia, and, after years of toil, had succeeded in

laying by sufficient money to purchase her freedom. We have already

spoken of Frank's dog; but were we to allow the matter to drop here it

would be a mortaloffense in the eyes of the young naturalist, for

Bravo held a very prominent position in his affections. He was a

pure-blooded Newfoundland, black as jet, very active and courageous,

and there was nothing in the hunting line that he did not understand;

and it was a well-established saying among the young Nimrods of the

village, that Frank, with Bravo's assistance, could kill more

squirrels in any given time than any three boys in Lawrence.

CHAPTER II.

An Ugly Customer.

Directly behind the cottage stands a long, low, neatly constructed

building, which is divided by partitions into three rooms, of which

one is used as a wood-shed, another for a carpenter's shop, and the

third is what Frank calls his "museum." It contains stuffed birds and


生词表:
  • series [´siəri:z] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.连续;系列;丛书   (初中英语单词)
  • situated [´sitʃueitid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.位于;处于….境地   (初中英语单词)
  • western [´westən] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.西的;西方的   (初中英语单词)
  • stream [stri:m] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.河 vi.流出;飘扬   (初中英语单词)
  • parallel [´pærəlel] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.平行的 n.平行线   (初中英语单词)
  • capture [´kæptʃə] 移动到这儿单词发声  vt.&n.捕获;俘获;夺取   (初中英语单词)
  • annual [´ænjuəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.每年的 n.年刊   (初中英语单词)
  • steamer [´sti:mə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.汽船;轮船;蒸笼   (初中英语单词)
  • cottage [´kɔtidʒ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.村舍;小屋;小别墅   (初中英语单词)
  • wealthy [´welθi] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.富有的;丰富的   (初中英语单词)
  • generous [´dʒenərəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.慷慨的;丰盛的   (初中英语单词)
  • prominent [´prɔminənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.突起的;凸出的   (初中英语单词)
  • application [,æpli´keiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.申请;申请书;应用   (初中英语单词)
  • advanced [əd´vɑ:nst] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.先进的;高级的   (初中英语单词)
  • working [´wə:kiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.工人的;劳动的   (初中英语单词)
  • thoroughly [´θʌrəli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.完全地,彻底地   (初中英语单词)
  • considerable [kən´sidərəbəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.重要的;值得重视   (初中英语单词)
  • scholar [´skɔlə, ´skɑ-] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.学者;奖学金获得者   (初中英语单词)
  • formerly [´fɔ:məli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.从前,以前   (初中英语单词)
  • suggestion [sə´dʒestʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.建议,提议;暗示   (初中英语单词)
  • farewell [feə´wel] 移动到这儿单词发声  int.再见 n.&a.告别   (初中英语单词)
  • curiosity [,kjuəri´ɔsiti] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.好奇;奇事;珍品   (初中英语单词)
  • literary [´litərəri] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.文学(上)的   (初中英语单词)
  • character [´kæriktə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.特性;性质;人物;字   (初中英语单词)
  • writing [´raitiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.书写;写作;书法   (初中英语单词)
  • exhibit [ig´zibit] 移动到这儿单词发声  vt.展出 n.展览品   (初中英语单词)
  • imagination [i,mædʒi´neiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.想象(力)   (初中英语单词)
  • bureau [´bjuərəu] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.局;编辑部;事务所   (初中英语单词)
  • combination [,kɔmbi´neiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.结合;联合;团体   (初中英语单词)
  • cannon [´kænən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.大炮   (初中英语单词)
  • vessel [´vesəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.容器;船;脉管   (初中英语单词)
  • pressure [´preʃə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.压榨 vt.对…施压力   (初中英语单词)
  • canvas [´kænvəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.帆布;油画(布)   (初中英语单词)
  • resemble [ri´zembəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  vt.类似,象   (初中英语单词)
  • lightning [´laitniŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.闪电 a.突然的   (初中英语单词)
  • variety [və´raiəti] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.变化;多样(性);种类   (初中英语单词)
  • feathered [´feðəd] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.有羽毛的;羽状的   (初中英语单词)
  • creation [kri´eiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.创作;作品;创造   (初中英语单词)
  • pitcher [´pitʃə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.大水罐;投掷者   (初中英语单词)
  • nicely [naisli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.恰好地;谨慎地   (初中英语单词)
  • driven [´driv(ə)n] 移动到这儿单词发声  drive 的过去分词   (初中英语单词)
  • fisherman [´fiʃəmən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.渔民,渔夫,打鱼人   (初中英语单词)
  • resist [ri´zist] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.抵抗;对抗;抵制   (初中英语单词)
  • artificial [,ɑ:ti´fiʃəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.人工的;模拟的   (初中英语单词)
  • willing [´wiliŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.情愿的,乐意的   (初中英语单词)
  • virginia [və´dʒinjə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.佛吉尼亚(州)   (初中英语单词)
  • offense [ə´fens] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.冒犯;触怒;犯法   (初中英语单词)
  • assistance [ə´sistəns] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.协作;援助;帮助   (初中英语单词)
  • thickly [´θikli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.厚厚地;密密地   (高中英语单词)
  • strife [straif] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.竞争;吵架;冲突   (高中英语单词)
  • strawberry [´strɔ:bəri] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.草莓   (高中英语单词)
  • abound [ə´baund] 移动到这儿单词发声  vi.多;富于;充满   (高中英语单词)
  • characteristic [,kæriktə´ristik] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.特有的 n.特性   (高中英语单词)
  • thorough [´θʌrə] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.彻底的;详尽的   (高中英语单词)
  • hurried [´hʌrid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.仓促的,慌忙的   (高中英语单词)
  • intense [in´tens] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.强烈的;紧张的   (高中英语单词)
  • decided [di´saidid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.明显的;决定的   (高中英语单词)
  • confident [´kɔnfidənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.有信心的,自信的   (高中英语单词)
  • stroll [strəul] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.&v.漫步;散步;游荡   (高中英语单词)
  • shelves [ʃelvz] 移动到这儿单词发声  shelf的复数   (高中英语单词)
  • miniature [´miniətʃə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.缩样 a.雏型的   (高中英语单词)
  • bearing [´beəriŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.举止;忍耐;关系   (高中英语单词)
  • pirate [´paiərət] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.海盗 v.做海盗;掠夺   (高中英语单词)
  • revenue [´revinju:] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.税收;收入   (高中英语单词)
  • ragged [´rægid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.衣服破烂的   (高中英语单词)
  • species [´spi:ʃi:z] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.(生物的)种,类   (高中英语单词)
  • finely [´fainli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.美好地;精细地   (高中英语单词)
  • extremity [ik´stremiti] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.末端;危机   (高中英语单词)
  • tackle [´tækəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.用具;装置 vt.处理   (高中英语单词)
  • obedience [ə´bi:djəns] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.服从;顺从   (高中英语单词)
  • mortal [´mɔ:tl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.致命的 n.凡人   (高中英语单词)
  • saying [´seiŋ, ´sei-iŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.言语;言论;格言   (高中英语单词)
  • fishing [´fiʃiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.钓鱼;捕鱼;渔业   (英语四级单词)
  • naturalist [´nætʃərəlist] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.自然主义者   (英语四级单词)
  • adjacent [ə´dʒeisənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.接近的;紧接着的   (英语四级单词)
  • undertook [,ʌndə´tuk] 移动到这儿单词发声  undertake的过去式   (英语四级单词)
  • devoted [di´vəutid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.献身…的,忠实的   (英语四级单词)
  • composed [kəm´pəuzd] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.镇静自若的   (英语四级单词)
  • exertion [ig´zə:ʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.努力;行使;活动   (英语四级单词)
  • reputation [repju´teiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.名誉;名声;信誉   (英语四级单词)
  • passionately [´pæʃənitli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.多情地;热烈地   (英语四级单词)
  • eloquent [´eləkwənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.流利的;雄辩的   (英语四级单词)
  • tiresome [´taiəsəm] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.令人厌倦的;讨厌的   (英语四级单词)
  • sorrowful [´sɔrəuful] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.悲伤的,使人伤心的   (英语四级单词)
  • musket [´mʌskit] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.滑膛枪   (英语四级单词)
  • cutter [´kʌtə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.裁剪师;刀具;快艇   (英语四级单词)
  • speaking [´spi:kiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.说话 a.发言的   (英语六级单词)
  • perseverance [,pə:si´viərəns] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.毅力;坚持   (英语六级单词)
  • hunting [´hʌntiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.打猎   (英语六级单词)
  • averse [ə´və:s] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.反对的,不乐意的   (英语六级单词)
  • respite [´respait] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.暂缓 vt.缓期执行   (英语六级单词)
  • bookcase [´buk-keis] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.书架(箱)   (英语六级单词)
  • pursuer [pə´sju:ə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.追赶者;追求者;从事者   (英语六级单词)
  • securely [si´kjuəli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.安全地;无疑地   (英语六级单词)
  • trusting [´trʌstiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.信任的;相信的   (英语六级单词)
  • inmate [´inmeit] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.(医院,监狱)同宿者   (英语六级单词)
  • newfoundland [,nju:fənd´lænd] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.纽芬兰(岛)   (英语六级单词)

  • 上传人 欢乐鱼 分享于 2017-06-26 17:28:28
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