酷兔英语



STRAY STUDIES

FROM

ENGLAND AND ITALY.

BY

JOHN RICHARD GREEN.

LONDON:

MACMILLAN AND CO.

1876.

LONDON:

PRINTED BY WILLIAM CLOWES AND SONS,

STAMFORD STREET AND CHARING CROSS.

PREFACE.

I have to thank the Editors of _Macmillan's Magazine_ and the _Saturday

Review_ for allowing me to reprint most of the papers in this series. In

many cases however I have greatly changed their original form. A few

pages will be found to repeat what I have already said in my 'Short

History.'

CONTENTS

PAGE

A BROTHER OF THE POOR 1

SKETCHES IN SUNSHINE:--

I. CANNES AND ST. HONORAT 31

II. CARNIVAL ON THE CORNICE 44

III. TWO PIRATE TOWNS OF THE RIVIERA 59

IV. THE WINTER RETREAT 71

V. SAN REMO 79

THE POETRY OF WEALTH 93

LAMBETH AND THE ARCHBISHOPS 107

CHILDREN BY THE SEA 167

THE FLORENCE OF DANTE 181

BUTTERCUPS 198

ABBOT AND TOWN 211

HOTELS IN THE CLOUDS 241

AENEAS: A VERGILIAN STUDY 257

TWO VENETIAN STUDIES:--

I. VENICE AND ROME 289

II. VENICE AND TINTORETTO 300

THE DISTRICT VISITOR 313

THE EARLY HISTORY OF OXFORD 329

THE HOME OF OUR ANGEVIN KINGS 359

CAPRI 383

CAPRI AND ITS ROMAN REMAINS 395

THE FEAST OF THE CORAL-FISHERS 414

A BROTHER OF THE POOR.

There are few stiller things than the stillness of a summer's noon such

as this, a summer's noon in a broken woodland, with the deer asleep in

the bracken, and the twitter of birds silent in the coppice, and hardly

a leaf astir in the huge beeches that fling their cool shade over the

grass. Afar off a gilded vane flares out above the grey Jacobean gables

of Knoll, the chime of a village clock falls faintly on the ear, but

there is no voice or footfall of living thing to break the silence as I

turn over leaf after leaf of the little book I have brought with me from

the bustle of town to this still retreat, a book that is the record of a

broken life, of a life "broken off," as he who lived it says of another,

"with a ragged edge."

It is a book that carries one far from the woodlandstillness around

into the din and turmoil of cities and men, into the misery and

degradation of "the East-end,"--that "London without London," as some

one called it the other day. Few regions are more unknown than the Tower

Hamlets. Not even Mrs. Riddell has ventured as yet to cross the border

which parts the City from their weltering mass of busy life, their

million of hard workers packed together in endless rows of monotonous

streets, broken only by shipyard or factory or huge breweries, streets

that stretch away eastward from Aldgate to the Essex marshes. And yet,

setting aside the poetry of life which is everywhere, there is poetry

enough in East London; poetry in the great river which washes it on the

south, in the fretted tangle of cordage and mast that peeps over the

roofs of Shadwell or in the great hulls moored along the wharves of

Wapping; poetry in the "Forest" that fringes it to the east, in the few

glades that remain of Epping and Hainault,--glades ringing with the

shouts of school-children out for their holiday and half mad with

delight at the sight of a flower or a butterfly; poetry of the present

in the work and toil of these acres of dull bricks and mortar where

everybody, man woman and child, is a worker, this England without a

"leisure class"; poetry in the thud of the steam-engine and the white

trail of steam from the tall sugar refinery, in the blear eyes of the

Spitalfields weaver, or the hungering faces of the group of labourers

clustered from morning till night round the gates of the docks and

watching for the wind that brings the ships up the river: poetry in its

past, in strange old-fashioned squares, in quaint gabled houses, in grey

village churches, that have been caught and overlapped and lost, as it

were, in the great human advance that has carried London forward from

Whitechapel, its limit in the age of the Georges, to Stratford, its

bound in that of Victoria.

Stepney is a belated village of this sort; its grey old church of St.

Dunstan, buried as it is now in the very heart of East London, stood

hardly a century ago among the fields. All round it lie tracts of human

life without a past; but memories clusterthickly round "Old Stepney,"

as the people call it with a certain fond reverence, memories of men

like Erasmus and Colet and the group of scholars in whom the Reformation

began. It was to the country house of the Dean of St. Paul's, hard by

the old church of St. Dunstan, that Erasmus betook him when tired of the

smoke and din of town. "I come to drink your fresh air, my Colet," he

writes, "to drink yet deeper of your rural peace." The fields and hedges

through which Erasmus loved to ride remained fields and hedges within

living memory; only forty years ago a Londoner took his Sunday outing

along the field path which led past the London Hospital to what was

still the suburban village church of Stepney. But the fields through

which the path led have their own church now, with its parish of dull

straight streets of monotonous houses already marked with premature

decay, and here and there alleys haunted by poverty and disease and

crime.

There is nothing marked about either church or district; their character

and that of their people are of the commonest East-end type. If I ask my

readers to follow me to this parish of St. Philip, it is simply because

these dull streets and alleys were chosen by a brave and earnest man as

the scene of his work among the poor. It was here that Edward Denison

settled in the autumn of 1867, in the second year of the great "East

London Distress." In the October of 1869 he left England on a fatal

voyage from which he was never to return. The collection of his letters

which has been recently printed by Sir Baldwyn Leighton has drawn so

much attention to the work which lay within the narrow bounds of those

two years that I may perhaps be pardoned for recalling my own memories

of one whom it is hard to forget.

A few words are enough to tell the tale of his earlier days. Born in

1840, the son of a bishop, and nephew of the late Speaker of the House

of Commons, Edward Denison passed from Eton to Christchurch, and was

forced after quitting the University to spend some time in foreign

travel by the delicacy of his health. His letters give an interesting

picture of his mind during this pause in an active life, a pause which

must have been especially distasteful to one whose whole bent lay from

the first in the direction of practical energy. "I believe," he says in

his later days, "that abstract political speculation is my _metier_;"

but few minds were in reality less inclined to abstract speculation.

From the very first one sees in him what one may venture to call the

best kind of "Whig" mind, that peculiartemper of fairness and

moderation which declines to push conclusions to extremes, and recoils

instinctively when opinion is extended beyond its proper bound. His

comment on Newman's 'Apologia' paints his real intellectualtemper with

remarkable precision. "I left off reading Newman's 'Apologia' before I

got to the end, tired of the ceaseless changes of the writer's mind, and

vexed with his morbid scruples--perhaps, too, having got a little out of

harmony myself with the feelings of the author, whereas I began by being

in harmony with them. I don't quite know whether to esteem it a blessing

or a curse; but whenever an opinion to which I am a recent convert, or

which I do not hold with the entire force of my intellect, is forced too

strongly upon me, or driven home to its logical conclusion, or

over-praised, or extended beyond its proper limits, I recoil

instinctively and begin to gravitate towards the other extreme, sure to

be in turn repelled by it also."

I dwell on this temper of his mind because it is this practical and

moderate character of the man which gives such weight to the very

sweeping conclusions on social subjects to which he was driven in his

later days. A judgment which condemns the whole system of Poor Laws, for

instance, falls with very different weight from a mere speculative

theorist and from a practical observer whose mind is constitutionally

averse from extreme conclusions. Throughout however we see this

intellectual moderation jostling with a moral fervour which feels

restlessly about for a fittingsphere of action. "Real life," he writes

from Madeira, "is not dinner-parties and small talk, nor even croquet

and dancing." There is a touch of exaggeration in phrases like these

which need not blind us to the depth and reality of the feeling which

they imperfectly express, a feeling which prompted the question which

embodies the spirit of all these earlier letters,--the question, "What

is my work?"

The answer to this question was found both within and without the

questioner. Those who were young in the weary days of Palmerstonian rule

will remember the disgust at purely political life which was produced by

the bureaucratic inaction of the time, and we can hardly wonder that,

like many of the finer minds among his contemporaries, Edward Denison

turned from the political field which was naturally open to him to the

field of social effort. His tendency in this direction was aided, no

doubt, partly by the intensity of this religious feeling and of his

consciousness of the duty he owed to the poor, and partly by that closer

sympathy with the physicalsuffering around us which is one of the most

encouraging characteristics of the day. Even in the midst of his

outburst of delight at a hard frost ("I like," he says, "the bright

sunshine that generally accompanies it, the silver landscape, and the

ringing distinctness of sounds in the frozen air"), we see him haunted

by a sense of the way in which his pleasure contrasts with the winter

misery of the poor. "I would rather give up all the pleasures of the

frost than indulge them, poisoned as they are by the misery of so many

of our brothers. What a monstrous thing it is that in the richest

country in the world large masses of the population should be condemned

annually to starvation and death!" It is easy to utter protests like

these in the spirit of a mere sentimentalist; it is less easy to carry

them out into practical effort, as Edward Denison resolved to do. After

an unsatisfactory attempt to act as Almoner for the Society for the

Relief of Distress, he resolved to fix himself personally in the

East-end of London, and study the great problem of pauperism face to

face.

His resolvesprang from no fit of transient enthusiasm, but from a sober

conviction of the need of such a step. "There are hardly any residents

in the East rich enough to give much money, or with enough leisure to

give much time," he says. "This is the evil. Even the best disposed in

the West don't like coming so far off, and, indeed, few have the time to

spare, and when they do there is great waste of time and energy on the

journey. My plan is the only really practicable one, and as I have both

means, time, and inclination, I should be a thief and a murderer if I

withheld what I so evidently owe." In the autumn of 1867 he carried out

his resolve, and took lodgings in the heart of the parish which I

sketched in the opening of this paper. If any romantic dreams had mixed

with his resolution they at once faded away before the dull, commonplace

reality. "I saw nothing very striking at Stepney," is his first comment

on the sphere he had chosen. But he was soon satisfied with his choice.

He took up in a quiet, practical way the work he found closest at hand.

"All is yet in embryo, but it will grow. Just now I only teach in a

night school, and do what in me lies in looking after the sick, keeping

an eye upon nuisances and the like, seeing that the local authorities

keep up to their work. I go to-morrow before the Board at the workhouse

to compel the removal to the infirmary of a man who ought to have been

there already. I shall drive the sanitaryinspector to put the Act

against overcrowding in force." Homely work of this sort grows on him;

we see him in these letters getting boys out to sea, keeping school with

little urchins,--"demons of misrule" who tried his temper,--gathering

round him a class of working men, organizing an evening club for boys.

All this, too, quietly and unostentatiously and with as little resort as

possible to "cheap charity," as he used to call it, to the "doles of

bread and meat which only do the work of poor-rates."

So quiet and simple indeed was his work that though it went on in the

parish of which I then had the charge it was some little time before I

came to know personally the doer of it. It is amusing even now to

recollect my first interview with Edward Denison. A vicar's Monday

morning is never the pleasantest of awakenings, but the Monday morning

of an East-end vicar brings worries that far eclipse the mere headache

and dyspepsia of his rural brother. It is the "parish morning." All the

complicated machinery of a great ecclesiastical, charitable, and

educational organization has got to be wound up afresh, and set going

again for another week. The superintendent of the Women's Mission is

waiting with a bundle of accounts, complicated as only ladies' accounts

can be. The churchwarden has come with a face full of gloom to consult

on the falling off in the offertory. The Scripture-reader has brought

his "visiting book" to be inspected, and a special report on the

character of a doubtful family in the parish. The organist drops in to

report something wrong in the pedals. There is a letter to be written to

the inspector of nuisances, directing his attention to certain

odoriferous drains in Pig-and-Whistle Alley. The nurse brings her

sick-list and her little bill for the sick-kitchen. The schoolmaster

wants a fresh pupil-teacher, and discusses nervously the prospects of

his scholars in the coming inspection. There is the interest on the

penny bank to be calculated, a squabble in the choir to be adjusted, a

district visitor to be replaced, reports to be drawn up for the Bishop's

Fund and a great charitable society, the curate's sick-list to be

inspected, and a preacher to be found for the next church festival.

It was in the midst of a host of worries such as these that a card was

laid on my table with a name which I recognized as that of a young

layman from the West-end, who had for two or three months past been

working in the mission district attached to the parish. Now, whatever

shame is implied in the confession, I had a certain horror of "laymen

from the West-end." Lay co-operation is an excellent thing in itself,

and one of my best assistants was a letter-sorter in the post-office

close by; but the "layman from the West-end," with a bishop's letter of

recommendation in his pocket and a head full of theories about "heathen

masses," was an unmitigated nuisance. I had a pretty large experience of

these gentlemen, and my one wish in life was to have no more. Some had a

firm belief in their own eloquence, and were zealous for a big room and

a big congregation. I got them the big room, but I was obliged to leave

the big congregation to their own exertions, and in a month or two their

voices faded away. Then there was the charitable layman, who pounced


生词表:
  • series [´siəri:z] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.连续;系列;丛书   (初中英语单词)
  • retreat [ri´tri:t] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.&n.退却;撤退;放弃   (初中英语单词)
  • poetry [´pəuitri] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.诗;诗意   (初中英语单词)
  • wealth [welθ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.财富,财产   (初中英语单词)
  • visitor [´vizitə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.访问者;来宾;参观者   (初中英语单词)
  • misery [´mizəri] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.痛苦;悲惨;穷困   (初中英语单词)
  • holiday [´hɔlidi] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.假日,假期,节日   (初中英语单词)
  • butterfly [´bʌtəflai] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.蝴蝶;蝶式   (初中英语单词)
  • worker [´wə:kə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.工人;劳动者;工作者   (初中英语单词)
  • old-fashioned [´əuld´feʃənd] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.老式的;过时的   (初中英语单词)
  • cluster [´klʌstə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.一串 v.群集;丛生   (初中英语单词)
  • haunted [´hɔ:tid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.常出现鬼的,闹鬼的   (初中英语单词)
  • poverty [´pɔvəti] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.贫穷(乏,瘠);不足   (初中英语单词)
  • earnest [´ə:nist] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.认真的 n.认真;诚恳   (初中英语单词)
  • collection [kə´lekʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.收集;征收;募捐   (初中英语单词)
  • bishop [´biʃəp] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.主教   (初中英语单词)
  • nephew [´nevju:, ´nɛfju] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.侄子;外甥   (初中英语单词)
  • speaker [´spi:kə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.演讲人;代言人   (初中英语单词)
  • energy [´enədʒi] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.活力,精力;能力   (初中英语单词)
  • reality [ri´æliti] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.现实(性);真实;逼真   (初中英语单词)
  • venture [´ventʃə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.投机 v.冒险;敢于   (初中英语单词)
  • peculiar [pi´kju:liə] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.特有的;奇异的   (初中英语单词)
  • temper [´tempə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.韧度 v.锻炼;调和   (初中英语单词)
  • reading [´ri:diŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.(阅)读;朗读;读物   (初中英语单词)
  • whereas [weər´æz] 移动到这儿单词发声  conj.鉴于;因此;而   (初中英语单词)
  • harmony [´hɑ:məni] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.调合,协调,和谐   (初中英语单词)
  • whenever [wen´evə] 移动到这儿单词发声  conj.&ad.无论何时   (初中英语单词)
  • convert [kən´və:t, ´kɔnvə:t] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.转变 n.改变信仰者   (初中英语单词)
  • driven [´driv(ə)n] 移动到这儿单词发声  drive 的过去分词   (初中英语单词)
  • conclusion [kən´klu:ʒən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.结束;结论;推论   (初中英语单词)
  • extreme [ik´stri:m] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.尽头的 n.极端   (初中英语单词)
  • character [´kæriktə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.特性;性质;人物;字   (初中英语单词)
  • system [´sistəm] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.系统,体系,制度   (初中英语单词)
  • observer [əb´zə:və] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.遵守者;观察员   (初中英语单词)
  • disgust [dis´gʌst] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.厌恶 vt.令(人)作呕   (初中英语单词)
  • purely [´pjuəli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.仅仅;简单地   (初中英语单词)
  • tendency [´tendənsi] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.趋势;倾向   (初中英语单词)
  • partly [´pɑ:tli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.部分地;不完全地   (初中英语单词)
  • physical [´fizikəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.物质的;有形的   (初中英语单词)
  • suffering [´sʌfəriŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.痛苦;灾害   (初中英语单词)
  • frozen [´frəuzn] 移动到这儿单词发声  freeze 的过去分词   (初中英语单词)
  • distress [di´stres] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.痛苦 vt.使苦恼   (初中英语单词)
  • resolve [ri´zɔlv] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.决心 n.决心;刚毅   (初中英语单词)
  • sprang [spræŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  spring 的过去式   (初中英语单词)
  • enthusiasm [in´θju:ziæzəm] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.热心;狂热;爱好   (初中英语单词)
  • evidently [´evidəntli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.明显地   (初中英语单词)
  • opening [´əupəniŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.开放;开端 a.开始的   (初中英语单词)
  • romantic [rəu´mæntik] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.传奇(式)的;浪漫的   (初中英语单词)
  • resolution [,rezə´lu:ʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.决心;坚决;果断   (初中英语单词)
  • striking [´straikiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.显著的,明显的   (初中英语单词)
  • working [´wə:kiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.工人的;劳动的   (初中英语单词)
  • resort [ri´zɔ:t] 移动到这儿单词发声  vi.求助;乞灵;诉诸   (初中英语单词)
  • charge [tʃɑ:dʒ] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.收费;冲锋 n.费用   (初中英语单词)
  • interview [´intəvju:] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.&vt.接见;会见;交谈   (初中英语单词)
  • mission [´miʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.代表团;使馆vt.派遣   (初中英语单词)
  • bundle [´bʌndl] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.包,捆;包袱(裹)   (初中英语单词)
  • complicated [´kɔmplikeitid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.结构复杂的;难懂的   (初中英语单词)
  • horror [´hɔrə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.恐怖;战栗   (初中英语单词)
  • belief [bi´li:f] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.相信;信仰,信条   (初中英语单词)
  • pirate [´paiərət] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.海盗 v.做海盗;掠夺   (高中英语单词)
  • venice [´venis] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.威尼斯   (高中英语单词)
  • oxford [´ɔksfəd] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.牛津   (高中英语单词)
  • stillness [´stilnis] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.不动;无声,寂静   (高中英语单词)
  • woodland [´wudlənd] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.树林,林地   (高中英语单词)
  • faintly [´feintli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.微弱地,软弱无力的   (高中英语单词)
  • bustle [´bʌsəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.(使)匆忙 n.匆忙   (高中英语单词)
  • ragged [´rægid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.衣服破烂的   (高中英语单词)
  • tangle [´tæŋgəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.&vt.(使)缠结;纠纷   (高中英语单词)
  • quaint [kweint] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.离奇的;奇妙的   (高中英语单词)
  • thickly [´θikli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.厚厚地;密密地   (高中英语单词)
  • reverence [´revərəns] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.尊敬;敬畏;尊严   (高中英语单词)
  • parish [´pæriʃ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.教区(的全体居民)   (高中英语单词)
  • delicacy [´delikəsi] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.精美;娇弱,微妙   (高中英语单词)
  • speculation [,spekju´leiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.思索,推测;投机   (高中英语单词)
  • intellectual [,inti´lektʃuəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.知识分子   (高中英语单词)
  • esteem [i´sti:m] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.尊重 vt.认为;感到   (高中英语单词)
  • sphere [sfiə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.圆体;天体;范围   (高中英语单词)
  • intensity [in´tensiti] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.激烈;强度;深度   (高中英语单词)
  • landscape [´lændskeip] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.风景;景色;风景画   (高中英语单词)
  • indulge [in´dʌldʒ] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.(使)沉迷;沉溺;放任   (高中英语单词)
  • monstrous [´mɔnstrəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.怪异的;庞大的   (高中英语单词)
  • personally [´pə:sənəli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.亲自;就个人来说   (高中英语单词)
  • leisure [´leʒə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.空闲;悠闲;安定   (高中英语单词)
  • inclination [,inkli´neiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.倾斜;爱好;天资   (高中英语单词)
  • murderer [´mə:dərə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.杀人犯,凶手   (高中英语单词)
  • seeing [si:iŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  see的现在分词 n.视觉   (高中英语单词)
  • removal [ri´mu:vəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.可移动的;可去除的   (高中英语单词)
  • inspector [in´spektə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.检查员;监察员   (高中英语单词)
  • homely [´həumli] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.朴素的;不漂亮的   (高中英语单词)
  • amusing [ə´mju:ziŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.有趣的   (高中英语单词)
  • superintendent [,su:pərin´tendənt, ,sju:-] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.管理人,负责人   (高中英语单词)
  • doubtful [´dautful] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.怀疑的,可疑的   (高中英语单词)
  • inspection [in´spekʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.检查;视察;参观   (高中英语单词)
  • preacher [´pri:tʃə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.讲道者,传教士   (高中英语单词)
  • confession [kən´feʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.招供;认错;交待   (高中英语单词)
  • nuisance [´nju:səns] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.损害;讨厌的人(事)   (高中英语单词)
  • florence [´flɔrəns] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.佛罗伦萨   (英语四级单词)
  • venetian [vi´ni:ʃ(ə)n] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.威尼斯城的   (英语四级单词)
  • eastward [´i:stwəd] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.&ad.向东(的)   (英语四级单词)
  • mortar [´mɔ:tə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.灰浆 vt.用灰浆涂抹   (英语四级单词)
  • weaver [´wi:və] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.纺织工;编织者   (英语四级单词)
  • monotonous [mə´nɔtənəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.单(音)调的   (英语四级单词)
  • abstract [´æbstrækt] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.抽象的 n.提要   (英语四级单词)
  • precision [pri´siʒən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.精密(度) a.精确的   (英语四级单词)
  • intellect [´intilekt] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.智力;有才智的人   (英语四级单词)
  • logical [´lɔdʒikəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.逻辑(上)的   (英语四级单词)
  • moderation [,mɔdə´reiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.适度;温和;节制   (英语四级单词)
  • starvation [stɑ:´veiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.饥饿;饿死   (英语四级单词)
  • resolved [ri´zɔlvd] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.决心的;坚定的   (英语四级单词)
  • sanitary [´sænitəri, -teri] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.卫生的 n.公共厕所   (英语四级单词)
  • eclipse [i´klips] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.丧失 vt.食;蒙蔽   (英语四级单词)
  • charitable [´tʃæritəbəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.仁爱的;慈善的   (英语四级单词)
  • nervously [´nə:vəsli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.神经质地;胆怯地   (英语四级单词)
  • eloquence [´eləkwəns] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.雄辩;口才   (英语四级单词)
  • zealous [´zeləs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.热情的;积极的   (英语四级单词)
  • congregation [,kɔŋgri´geiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.集合;团体   (英语四级单词)
  • layman [´leimən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.俗人   (英语四级单词)
  • twitter [´twitə] 移动到这儿单词发声  vi.(鸟)吱吱叫 n.鸟鸣   (英语六级单词)
  • turmoil [´tə:mɔil] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.骚动;混乱   (英语六级单词)
  • wharves [wɔ:vz] 移动到这儿单词发声  wharf的复数   (英语六级单词)
  • steam-engine [´sti:m,endʒin] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.蒸汽机   (英语六级单词)
  • belated [bi´leitid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.延误的;遗留的   (英语六级单词)
  • suburban [sə´bə:bən] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.郊区的 n.郊区居民   (英语六级单词)
  • distasteful [dis´teistful] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.讨厌的;乏味的   (英语六级单词)
  • fairness [´fɛənis] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.公正;晴朗   (英语六级单词)
  • extended [iks´tendid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.伸长的;广大的   (英语六级单词)
  • ceaseless [´si:slis] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.不绝的,不停的   (英语六级单词)
  • fitting [´fitiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.适当的 n.试衣   (英语六级单词)
  • exaggeration [ig,zædʒə´reiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.夸张,夸大   (英语六级单词)
  • unsatisfactory [,ʌnsætis´fæktəri] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.不能令人满意的   (英语六级单词)
  • transient [´trænziənt, ´trænʃənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.短暂的;无常的   (英语六级单词)
  • practicable [´præktikəbəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.可实行的;适用的   (英语六级单词)
  • embryo [´embriəu] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.胚胎;萌芽时期   (英语六级单词)
  • ecclesiastical [i,kli:zi´æstikəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.基督教会的;教士的   (英语六级单词)
  • organist [´ɔ:gənist] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.风琴手   (英语六级单词)

  • 上传人 欢乐鱼 分享于 2017-06-26 17:15:21
    文章信息 浏览:0 评论:  赞: