酷兔英语



THE HEPTALOGIA

By Algernon Charles Swinburne

Taken from THE COLLECTED POETICAL WORKS

OF ALGERNON CHARLES SWINBURNE, VOL. V

SWINBURNE'S POETICAL WORKS

I. POEMS AND BALLADS (First Series).

II. SONGS BEFORE SUNRISE, and SONGS OF TWO NATIONS.

III. POEMS AND BALLADS (Second and Third Series), and SONGS OF THE

SPRINGTIDES.

IV. TRISTRAM OF LYONESSE, THE TALE OF BALEN, ATALANTA IN CALYDON,

ERECHTHEUS.

V. STUDIES IN SONG, A CENTURY OF ROUNDELS, SONNETS ON ENGLISH DRAMATIC

POETS, THE HEPTALOGIA, ETC.

VI. A MIDSUMMER HOLIDAY, ASTROPHEL, A CHANNEL PASSAGE AND OTHER POEMS.

LONDON: WILLIAM HEINEMANN

THE

HEPTALOGIA

By

Algernon Charles Swinburne

1917

LONDON: WILLIAM HEINEMANN

_First printed (Chatto), 1904

Reprinted 1904, '09, '10, '12

(Heinemann), 1917_

_London: William Heinemann, 1917_

* * * * *

THE HEPTALOGIA

THE HIGHER PANTHEISM IN A NUTSHELL 373

JOHN JONES'S WIFE 375

THE POET AND THE WOODLOUSE 396

THE PERSON OF THE HOUSE 400

LAST WORDS OF A SEVENTH-RATE POET 406

SONNET FOR A PICTURE 421

NEPHELIDIA 422

* * * * *

SPECIMENS OF MODERN POETS

THE HEPTALOGIA

OR

THE SEVEN AGAINST SENSE

A CAP WITH SEVEN BELLS

THE HIGHER PANTHEISM

IN A NUTSHELL

One, who is not, we see: but one, whom we see not, is:

Surely this is not that: but that is assuredly this.

What, and wherefore, and whence? for under is over and under:

If thunder could be without lightning, lightning could be without thunder.

Doubt is faith in the main: but faith, on the whole, is doubt:

We cannot believe by proof: but could we believe without?

Why, and whither, and how? for barley and rye are not clover:

Neither are straight lines curves: yet over is under and over.

Two and two may be four: but four and four are not eight:

Fate and God may be twain: but God is the same thing as fate.

Ask a man what he thinks, and get from a man what he feels:

God, once caught in the fact, shows you a fair pair of heels.

Body and spirit are twins: God only knows which is which:

The soul squats down in the flesh, like a tinker drunk in a ditch.

More is the whole than a part: but half is more than the whole:

Clearly, the soul is the body: but is not the body the soul?

One and two are not one: but one and nothing is two:

Truth can hardly be false, if falsehood cannot be true.

Once the mastodon was: pterodactyls were common as cocks:

Then the mammoth was God: now is He a prize ox.

Parallels all things are: yet many of these are askew:

You are certainly I: but certainly I am not you.

Springs the rock from the plain, shoots the stream from the rock:

Cocks exist for the hen: but hens exist for the cock.

God, whom we see not, is: and God, who is not, we see:

Fiddle, we know, is diddle: and diddle, we take it, is dee.

* * * * *

JOHN JONES'S WIFE

I

AT THE PIANO

I

Love me and leave me; what love bids retrieve me? can June's fist

grasp May?

Leave me and love me; hopes eyed once above me like spring's sprouts

decay;

Fall as the snow falls, when summer leaves grow false--cards packed

for storm's play!

II

Nay, say Decay's self be but last May's elf, wing shifted, eye sheathed--

Changeling in April's crib rocked, who lets 'scape rills locked fast

since frost breathed--

Skin cast (think!) adder-like, now bloom bursts bladder-like,--bloom

frost bequeathed?

III

Ah, how can fear sit and hear as love hears it grief's heart's cracked

grate's screech?

Chance lets the gate sway that opens on hate's way and shews on shame's

beach

Crouched like an imp sly change watch sweet love's shrimps lie, a

toothful in each.

IV

Time feels his tooth slip on husks wet from Truth's lip, which drops

them and grins--

Shells where no throb stirs of life left in lobsters since joy thrilled

their fins--

Hues of the prawn's tail or comb that makes dawn stale, so red for our

sins!

V

Years blind and deaf use the soul's joys as refuse, heart's peace as

manure,

Reared whence, next June's rose shall bloom where our moons rose last

year, just as pure:

Moons' ends match roses' ends: men by beasts' noses' ends mete sin's

stink's cure.

VI

Leaves love last year smelt now feel dead love's tears melt--flies

caught in time's mesh!

Salt are the dews in which new time breeds new sin, brews blood and

stews flesh;

Next year may see dead more germs than this weeded and reared them

afresh.

VII

Old times left perish, there's new time to cherish; life just shifts

its tune;

As, when the day dies, earth, half afraid, eyes the growth of the moon;

Love me and save me, take me or waive me; death takes one so soon!

II

BY THE CLIFF

I

Is it daytime (guess),

You that feed my soul

To excess

With that light in those eyes

And those curls drawn like a scroll

In that round grave guise?

No or yes?

II

Oh, the end, I'd say!

Such a foolish thing

(Pure girls' play!)

As a mere mute heart,

Was it worth a kiss, a ring,

This? for two must part--

Not to-day.

III

Look, the whole sand crawls,

Hums, a heaving hive,

Scrapes and scrawls--

Such a buzz and burst!

Here just one thing's not alive,

One that was at first--

But life palls.

IV

Yes, my heart, I know,

Just my heart's stone dead--

Yes, just so.

Sick with heat, those worms

Drop down scorched and overfed--

No more need of germs!

Let them go.

V

Yes, but you now, look,

You, the rouged stage female

With a crook,

Chalked Arcadian sham,

You that made my soul's sleep's dream ail--

Your soul fit to damn?

Shut the book.

III

ON THE SANDS

I

There was nothing at all in the case (conceive)

But love; being love, it was not (understand)

Such a thing as the years let fall (believe)

Like the rope's coil dropt from a fisherman's hand

When the boat's hauled up--"by your leave!"

II

So--well! How that crab writhes--leg after leg

Drawn, as a worm draws ring upon ring

Gradually, not gladly! Chicken or egg,

Is it more than the ransom (say) of a king

(Take my meaning at least) that I beg?

III

Not so! You were ready to learn, I think,

What the world said! "He loves you too well (suppose)

For such leanings! These poets, their love's mere ink--

Like a flower, their flame flashes--a rosebud, blows--

Then it all drops down at a wink!

IV

"Ah, the instance! A curl of a blossomless vine

The vinedresser passing it sickens to see

And mutters 'Much hope (under God) of His wine

From the branch and the bark of a barren tree

Spring reared not, and winter lets pine--

V

"'His wine that should glorify (saith He) the cup

That a man beholding (not tasting) might say

"Pour out life at a draught, drain it dry, drink it up,

Give this one thing, and huddle the rest away--

Save the bitch, and be hanged to the pup!"

VI

"'Let it rot then!' which saying, he leaves it--we'll guess,

Feels (if the sap move at all) thus much--

Yearns, and would blossom, would quicken no less,

Bud at an eye's glance, flower at a touch--

'Die, perhaps, would you not, for her?'--'Yes!'

VII

"Note the hitch there! That's piteous--so much being done,

(He'll think some day, your lover) so little to do!

Such infinite days to wear out, once begun!

Since the hand its glove holds, and the footsole its shoe--

Overhead too there's always the sun!"

VIII

Oh, no doubt they had said so, your friends--been profuse

Of good counsel, wise hints--"where the trap lurks, walk warily--

Squeeze the fruit to the core ere you count on the juice!

For the graft may fail, shift, wax, change colour, wane, vary, lie--"

You were cautious, God knows--to what use?

IX

This crab's wiser, it strikes me--no twist but implies life--

Not a curl but's so fit you could find none fitter--

For the brute from its brutehood looks up thus and eyes life--

Stoop your soul down and listen, you'll hear it twitter,

Laughing lightly,--my crab's life's the wise life!

X

Those who've read S. T. Coleridge remember how Sammy sighs

To his pensive (I think he says) Sara--"most soothing-sweet"--

Crab's bulk's less (look!) than man's--yet (quoth Cancer) I am my size,

And my bulk's girth contents me! Man's maw (see?) craves two things--

wheat

And flesh likewise--man's gluttonous--damn his eyes!

XI

Crab's content with crab's provender: crab's love, if soothing,

Is no sweeter than pincers are soft--and a new sickle

Cuts no sharper than crab's claws nip, keen as boar's toothing!

Yet crab's love's no less fervent than bard's, if less musical--

'Tis a new thing I'd lilt--but a true thing.

XII

Old songs tell us, of all drinks for Englishmen fighting, ale's

Out and out best: salt water contents crab, it seems to me,

Though pugnacious as sailors, and skilled to steer right in gales

That craze pilots, if slow to sing--"Sleep'st thou? thou dream'st

o' me!"

In such love-strains as mine--or a nightingale's.

XIII

Ah, now, look you--tail foremost, the beast sets seaward--

The sea draws it, sand sucks it--he's wise, my crab!

From the napkin out jumps his one talent--good steward,

Just judge! So a man shirks the smile or the stab,

And sets his sail duly to leeward!

XIV

Trust me? Hardly! I bid you not lean (remark)

On my spirit, your spirit--my flesh, your flesh--

Hold my hand, and tread safe through the horrible dark--

Quench my soul as with sprinklings of snow, then refresh

With some blast of new bellows the spark!

XV


生词表:
  • holiday [´hɔlidi] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.假日,假期,节日   (初中英语单词)
  • channel [´tʃænəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.海峡;航道;途径   (初中英语单词)
  • thunder [´θʌndə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.雷 vi.打雷 vt.吼出   (初中英语单词)
  • lightning [´laitniŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.闪电 a.突然的   (初中英语单词)
  • stream [stri:m] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.河 vi.流出;飘扬   (初中英语单词)
  • perish [´periʃ] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.灭亡;消灭;(使)死去   (初中英语单词)
  • barren [´bærən] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.贫瘠的;不生育的   (初中英语单词)
  • blossom [´blɔsəm] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.花;开花期 vi.开花   (初中英语单词)
  • counsel [´kaunsəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.商议;劝告;律师   (初中英语单词)
  • contents [´kɔ:ntents] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.容纳物;要旨   (初中英语单词)
  • horrible [´hɔrəbəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.可怕的;恐怖的   (初中英语单词)
  • sunrise [´sʌnraiz] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.日出,黎明   (高中英语单词)
  • barley [´bɑ:li] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.大麦   (高中英语单词)
  • falsehood [´fɔ:lshud] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.错误;撒谎   (高中英语单词)
  • cherish [´tʃeriʃ] 移动到这儿单词发声  vt.珍爱;怀有(感情)   (高中英语单词)
  • daytime [´deitaim] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.白天   (高中英语单词)
  • ransom [´rænsəm] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.赎金;勒索 vt.赎   (高中英语单词)
  • draught [drɑ:ft] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.通风,通气;吸出   (高中英语单词)
  • huddle [´hʌdl] 移动到这儿单词发声  vi.卷缩 vt.乱堆,乱挤   (高中英语单词)
  • saying [´seiŋ, ´sei-iŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.言语;言论;格言   (高中英语单词)
  • quicken [´kwikən] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.加快;加速;鼓舞   (高中英语单词)
  • infinite [´infinit] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.无限的,无穷的   (高中英语单词)
  • skilled [skild] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.有技能的,熟练的   (高中英语单词)
  • foremost [´fɔ:məust] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.最重要的;最先的   (高中英语单词)
  • napkin [´næpkin] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.餐巾;手帕;尿布   (高中英语单词)
  • midsummer [´mid,sʌmə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.仲夏;夏至   (英语四级单词)
  • assuredly [ə´ʃuəridli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.确实地;确信地   (英语四级单词)
  • wherefore [´weəfɔ:] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.为什么;因此   (英语四级单词)
  • whence [wens] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.从何处;从那里   (英语四级单词)
  • tinker [´tiŋkə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.&v.补锅(匠)   (英语四级单词)
  • glorify [´glɔ:rifai] 移动到这儿单词发声  vt.赞美,颂扬,美化   (英语四级单词)
  • cautious [´kɔ:ʃəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.小心的;谨慎的   (英语四级单词)
  • poetical [pəu´etikəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.理想化了的   (英语六级单词)
  • mammoth [´mæməθ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.庞大的   (英语六级单词)
  • rosebud [´rəuzbʌd] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.玫瑰花苞   (英语六级单词)
  • pensive [´pensiv] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.沉思的;忧郁的   (英语六级单词)
  • fervent [´fə:vənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.强烈的;热情的   (英语六级单词)

  • 上传人 欢乐鱼 分享于 2017-06-26 17:17:17
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