酷兔英语



THE CALLING OF DAN MATTHEWS

BY

HAROLD BELL WRIGHT

1909

AUTHOR OF

"THE SHEPHERD OF THE HILLS"

"THAT PRINTER OF UDELL'S"

_With Illustrations by_

ARTHUR I. KELLER

TO

WILLIAM WILLIAMS, M.D.

CONTENTS

I. THE HOME OF THE ALLY

II. A REVELATION

III. A GREAT DAY IN CORINTH

IV. WHO ARE THEY?

V. HOPE FARWELL'S MINISTRY

VI. THE CALLING OF DAN MATTHEWS

VII. FROM DEBORAH'S PORCH

VIII. THE WORK OF THE ALLY

IX. THE EDGE OF THE BATTLEFIELD

X. A MATTER OF OPINION

XI. REFLECTIONS

XII. THE NURSE FORGETS

XIII. DR. HARRY'S CASE

XIV. THAT GIRL OF CONNER'S

XV. THE MINISTER'S OPPORTUNITY

XVI. DAN SEES THE OTHER SIDE

XVII. THE TRAGEDY

XVIII. TO SAVE A LIFE

XIX. ON FISHING

XX. COMMON GROUND

XXI. THE WARNING

XXII. AS DR. HARRY SEES IT

XXIII. A PARABLE

XXIV. THE WAY OUT

XXV. A LABORER AND HIS HIRE

XXVI. THE WINTER PASSES

XXVII. DEBORAH'S TROUBLE

XXVIII. A FISHERMAN

XXIX. A MATTER OF BUSINESS

XXX. THE DAUGHTER OF THE CHURCH

XXXI. THE REALITY

XXXII. THE BARRIER

XXXIII. HEART'S TRAGEDIES

XXXIV. SACRIFICED

XXXV. THE TIE THAT BINDS

XXXVI. GOOD-BYE

XXXVII. RESULTS

XXXVIII. A HANDFUL OF GOLD

XXXIX. THE VICTORY OF THE ALLY

XL. THE DOCTOR'S GLASSES

XLI. THE FINAL WORD

XLII. JUSTICE

XLIII. THE HOME COMING

XLIV. THE OLD TRAIL

ILLUSTRATIONS

Drawn by

ARTHUR I. KELLER

WITH THE DOCTOR THE TWO STRANGERS IN CORINTH TOOK DENNY TO HIS HOME

"--YOU MUST BE IN LIFE A FISHERMAN"

A GOOD-BYE CARESS

DAN PLEADED WITH HIM

The Calling of Dan Matthews

CHAPTER I.

THE HOME OF THE ALLY

"And because the town of this story is what it is, there came to dwell

in it a Spirit--a strange, mysterious power--playful, vicious, deadly; a

Something to be at once feared and courted; to be denied--yet confessed

in the denial; a deadly enemy, a welcome friend, an all-powerful Ally."

This story began in the Ozark Mountains. It follows the trail that is

nobody knows how old. But mostly this story happened in Corinth, a town

of the middle class in a Middle Western state.

There is nothing peculiar about Corinth. The story might have happened

just as well in any other place, for the only distinguishing feature

about this town is its utter lack of any distinguishing feature whatever.

In all the essential elements of its life, so far as this story goes,

Corinth is exactly like every other village, town or city in the land.

This, indeed, is why the story happened in this particular place.

Years ago, when the railroad first climbed the backbone of the Ozarks, it

found Corinth already located on the summit. Even before the war, this

county-seat town was a place of no little importance, and many a good

tale might be told of those exciting days when the woods were full of

guerrillas and bushwhackers, and the village was raided first by one

side, then by the other. Many a good tale is told, indeed; for the

fathers and mothers of Corinth love to talk of the war times, and to

point out in Old Town the bullet-marked buildings and the scenes of many

thrilling events.

But the sons and daughters of the passing generation, with their sons

and daughters, like better to talk of the great things that are going to

be--when the proposed shoe-factory comes, the talked-of mills are

established, the dreamed-of electric line is built out from the city, or

the Capitalist from Somewhere-else arrives to invest in vacant lots,

thereon to build new hotels and business blocks.

The Doctor says that in the whole history of Corinth there are only two

events. The first was the coming of the railroad; the second was the

death of the Doctor's good friend, the Statesman.

The railroad did not actually enter Corinth. It stopped at the front

gate. But with Judge Strong's assistance the fathers and mothers

recognized their "golden opportunity" and took the step which the

eloquent Judge assured them would result in a "glorious future." They

left the beautiful, well-drained site chosen by those who cleared the

wilderness, and stretched themselves out along the mud-flat on either

side of the sacred right-of-way--that same mud-flat being, incidentally,

the property of the patriotic Judge.

Thus Corinth took the railroad to her heart, literally. The depot, the

yards, the red section-house and the water-tank are all in the very

center of the town. Every train while stopping for water (and they all

stop) blocks two of the three principal streets. And when, after waiting

in the rain or snow until his patience is nearly exhausted, the humble

Corinthian goes to the only remaining crossing, he always gets there just

in time to meet a long freight backing onto the siding. Nowhere in the

whole place can one escape the screaming whistle, clanging bell, and

crashing drawbar. Day and night the rumble of the heavy trains jars and

disturbs the peacefulness of the little village.

But the railroad did something for Corinth; not too much, but something.

It did more for Judge Strong. For a time the town grew rapidly.

Fulfillment of the Judge's prophecies seemed immediate and certain. Then,

as mysteriously as they had come, the boom days departed. The mills,

factories and shops that were going to be, established themselves

elsewhere. The sound of the builder's hammer was no longer heard. The

Doctor says that Judge Strong had come to believe in his own prediction,

or at least, fearing that his prophecy might prove true, refused to part

with more land except at prices that would be justified only in a great

metropolis.

Neighboring towns that were born when Corinth was middle-aged, flourished

and have become cities of importance. The country round about has grown

rich and prosperous. Each year more and heavier trains thunder past on

their way to and from the great city by the distant river, stopping only

to take water. But in this swiftly moving stream of life Corinth is

caught in an eddy. Her small world has come to swing in a very small

circle--it can scarcely be said to swing at all. The very children stop

growing when they become men and women, and are content to dream the

dreams their fathers' fathers dreamed, even as they live in the houses

the fathers of their fathers built. Only the trees that line the unpaved

streets have grown--grown and grown until overhead their great tops touch

to shut out the sky with an arch of green, and their mighty trunks crowd

contemptuously aside the old sidewalks, with their decayed and broken

boards.

Old Town, a mile away, is given over to the negroes. The few buildings

that remain are fallen into ruin, save as they are patched up by their

dusky tenants. And on the hill, the old Academy with its broken windows,

crumbling walls, and fallen chimneys, stands a pitifulwitness of an

honor and dignity that is gone.

Poor Corinth! So are gone the days of her true glory--the glory of her

usefulness, while the days of her promised honor and power are not yet

fulfilled.

And because the town of this story is what it is, there came to dwell in

it a Spirit--a strange, mysterious power--playful, vicious, deadly; a

Something to be at once feared and courted; to be denied--yet confessed

in the denial; a dreaded enemy, a welcome friend, an all-powerful Ally.

But, for Corinth, the humiliation of her material failure is forgotten

in her pride of a finer success. The shame of commercial and civic

obscurity is lost in the light of national recognition. And that

self-respect and pride of place, without which neither man nor town can

look the world in the face, is saved to her by the Statesman.

Born in Corinth, a graduate of the old Academy, town clerk, mayor, county

clerk, state senator, congressman, his zeal in advocating a much

discussed issue of his day, won for him national notice, and for his

town everlasting fame.

In this man unusual talents were combined with rare integrity of purpose

and purity of life. Politics to him meant a way whereby he might serve

his fellows. However much men differed as to the value of the measures

for which he fought, no one ever doubted his belief in them or questioned

his reasons for fighting. It was not at all strange that such a man

should have won the respect and friendship of the truly great. But with

all the honors that came to him, the Statesman's heart never turned from

the little Ozark town, and it was here among those who knew him best that

his influence for good was greatest and that he was most loved and

honored. Thus all that the railroad failed to do for Corinth the

Statesman did in a larger, finer way.

Then the Statesman died.

It was the Old Town Corinth of the brick Academy days that inspired

the erection of a monument to his memory. But it was the Corinth of the

newer railroad days that made this monument of cast-iron; and under the

cast-iron, life-sized, portrait figure of the dead statesman, this newer

Corinth placed in cast-iron letters a quotation from one of his famous

speeches upon an issue of his day.

The Doctor argues in language most vigorous that the broken sidewalks,

the permitted insolence of the railroad, the presence and power of that

Spirit, the Ally, and many other things and conditions in Corinth, with

the lack of as many other things and conditions, are all due to the

influence of what he calls "that hideous, cast-iron monstrosity." By

this it will be seen that the Doctor is something of a philosopher.

The monument stands on the corner where Holmes Street ends in Strong

Avenue. On the opposite corner the Doctor lives with Martha, his wife.

It is a modest home for there are no children and the Doctor is not rich.

The house is white with old-fashioned green shutters, and over the porch

climbs a mass of vines. The steps are worn very thin and the ends of the

floor-boards are rotted badly by the moisture of the growing vines. But

the Doctor says he'll "be damned" if he'll pull down such a fine old vine

to put in new boards, and that those will last anyway longer than either

he or Martha. By this it will be seen that the Doctor is something of a

poet.

On the rear of the lot is the wood-shed and stable; and on the east,

along the fence in front, and down the Holmes Street side, are the

Doctor's roses--the admiration and despair of every flower-growing

housewife in town.

Full fifty years of the Doctor's professional life have been spent in

active practice in Corinth and in the country round about. He declares

himself worn out now and good for nothing, save to meddle in the affairs

of his neighbors, to cultivate his roses, and--when the days are

bright--to go fishing. For the rest, he sits in his chair on the porch

and watches the world go by.

"Old Doctors and old dogs," he growls, "how equallyuseless we are, and

yet how much--how much we could tell if only we dared speak!"

He is big, is the Doctor--big and fat and old. He knows every soul in

Corinth, particularly the children; indeed he helped most of them to

come to Corinth. He is acquainted as well with every dog and cat, and

horse and cow, knowing their every trick and habit, from the old brindle

milker that unlatches his front gate to feed on the lawn, to the bull

pup that pinches his legs when he calls on old Granny Brown. For miles

around, every road, lane, by-path, shortcut and trail, is a familiar way

to him. His practice, he declares, has well-nigh ruined him financially,

and totally wrecked his temper. He can curse a man and cry over a baby;

and he would go as far and work as hard for the illiterate and penniless

backwoodsman in his cabin home as for the president of the Bank of

Corinth or even Judge Strong himself.

No one ever thinks of the Doctor as loving anyone or anything, and that

is because he is so big and rough on the outside: but every one in

trouble goes to him, and that is because he is so big and kind on the

inside. It is a common saying that in cases of tryingillness or serious

accident a patient would rather "hear the Doctor cuss, than listen to

the parson pray." Other physicians there are in Corinth, but every one

understands when his neighbor says: "The Doctor." Nor does anyone ever,

ever call him "Doc"!

After all, who knows the people of a community so well as the physician

who lives among them? To the world the Doctor's patients were laborers,

bankers, dressmakers, scrub-women, farmers, servants, teachers,

preachers; to the Doctor they were men and women. Others knew their

occupations--he knew their lives. The preachers knew what they

professed--he knew what they practiced. Society saw them dressed up--he

saw them--in bed. Why, the Doctor has spent more hours in the homes of

his neighbors than ever he passed under his own roof, and there is not a

skeleton closet in the whole town to which he has not the key.

On Strong Avenue, across from the monument, is a tiny four-roomed

cottage. In the time of this story it wanted paint badly, and was not in

the best of repair. But the place was neat and clean, with a big lilac

bush just inside the gate, giving it an air of home-like privacy; and on

the side directly opposite the Doctor's a fair-sized, well-kept garden,

giving it an air of honest thrift. Here the widow Mulhall lived with her

crippled son, Denny. Denny was to have been educated for the priesthood,

but the accident that left him such a hopelesscripple shattered that

dream; and after the death of his father, who was killed while

discharging his duties as the town marshal, there was no money to buy

even a book.

When there was anything for her to do, Deborah worked out by the day.

Denny, in spite of his poor, misshapen body, tended the garden, raising

such vegetables as no one else in all Corinth could--or would, raise.


生词表:
  • shepherd [´ʃepəd] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.牧羊人 vt.带领   (初中英语单词)
  • victory [´viktəri] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.胜利,战胜   (初中英语单词)
  • mysterious [mi´stiəriəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.神秘的;难以理解的   (初中英语单词)
  • deadly [´dedli] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.致命的 ad.死一般地   (初中英语单词)
  • welcome [´welkəm] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.受欢迎的;可喜的   (初中英语单词)
  • mostly [´məustli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.主要地;多半;通常   (初中英语单词)
  • western [´westən] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.西的;西方的   (初中英语单词)
  • peculiar [pi´kju:liə] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.特有的;奇异的   (初中英语单词)
  • essential [i´senʃəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.必需的 n.要素,要点   (初中英语单词)
  • generation [,dʒenə´reiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.发生;世代;同龄人   (初中英语单词)
  • capitalist [´kæpitəlist] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.资本主义的n.资本家   (初中英语单词)
  • invest [in´vest] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.投资;授予   (初中英语单词)
  • vacant [´veikənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.空虚的,无表情的   (初中英语单词)
  • actually [´æktʃuəli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.事实上;实际上   (初中英语单词)
  • assistance [ə´sistəns] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.协作;援助;帮助   (初中英语单词)
  • sacred [´seikrid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.神圣的;庄严的   (初中英语单词)
  • principal [´prinsəpəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.主要的 n.负责人   (初中英语单词)
  • patience [´peiʃəns] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.忍耐(力);耐心;坚韧   (初中英语单词)
  • freight [freit] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.运货 vt.运送;充满   (初中英语单词)
  • whistle [´wisəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.吹哨 n.口哨;汽笛   (初中英语单词)
  • mysteriously [mis´tiəriəsli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.神秘地;故弄玄虚地   (初中英语单词)
  • hammer [´hæmə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.锤子 v.重击   (初中英语单词)
  • prosperous [´prɔspərəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.繁荣的;顺利的   (初中英语单词)
  • thunder [´θʌndə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.雷 vi.打雷 vt.吼出   (初中英语单词)
  • swiftly [´swiftli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.迅速地,敏捷地   (初中英语单词)
  • stream [stri:m] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.河 vi.流出;飘扬   (初中英语单词)
  • overhead [´əuvə,hed] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.当头 a.在头上的   (初中英语单词)
  • academy [ə´kædəmi] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.专科学校;学会;协会   (初中英语单词)
  • witness [´witnis] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.见证人 vt.目击   (初中英语单词)
  • dignity [´digniti] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.尊严,尊贵;高官显贵   (初中英语单词)
  • failure [´feiljə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.失败;衰竭;破产   (初中英语单词)
  • commercial [kə´mə:ʃəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.商业的 n.广告节目   (初中英语单词)
  • recognition [,rekəg´niʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.认出;认识;承认   (初中英语单词)
  • unusual [ʌn´ju:ʒuəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.不平常的;异常的   (初中英语单词)
  • purity [´pjuəriti] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.纯净;贞洁   (初中英语单词)
  • politics [´pɔlitiks] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.政治(学);政治活动   (初中英语单词)
  • belief [bi´li:f] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.相信;信仰,信条   (初中英语单词)
  • statesman [´steitsmən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.政治家,国务活动家   (初中英语单词)
  • monument [´mɔnjumənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.纪念碑;古迹   (初中英语单词)
  • modest [´mɔdist] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.谦虚的;朴素的   (初中英语单词)
  • old-fashioned [´əuld´feʃənd] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.老式的;过时的   (初中英语单词)
  • moisture [´mɔistʃə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.潮湿;温度;水份   (初中英语单词)
  • stable [´steibəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.马棚 a.稳固的   (初中英语单词)
  • admiration [,ædmə´reiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.赞赏,钦佩   (初中英语单词)
  • despair [di´speə] 移动到这儿单词发声  vi.&n.绝望   (初中英语单词)
  • professional [prə´feʃənəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.职业的 n.自由职业   (初中英语单词)
  • cultivate [´kʌltiveit] 移动到这儿单词发声  vt.耕作;培植;培养   (初中英语单词)
  • equally [´i:kwəli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.相等地;平等地   (初中英语单词)
  • useless [´ju:sləs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.无用的,无价值的   (初中英语单词)
  • knowing [´nəuiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.会意的,心照不宣的   (初中英语单词)
  • temper [´tempə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.韧度 v.锻炼;调和   (初中英语单词)
  • illness [´ilnis] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.生病,不健康,疾病   (初中英语单词)
  • closet [´klɔzit] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.橱;私室;盥洗室   (初中英语单词)
  • repair [ri´peə] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.&n.修理,修补   (初中英语单词)
  • laborer [´leibərə] 移动到这儿单词发声  (=labourer) n.工人   (高中英语单词)
  • handful [hændful] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.一把,少数,一小撮   (高中英语单词)
  • summit [´sʌmit] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.顶(点);绝顶   (高中英语单词)
  • patriotic [,pætri´ɔtik] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.爱国的   (高中英语单词)
  • literally [´litərəli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.逐字地;实际上   (高中英语单词)
  • nowhere [´nəuweə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.无处;不知道   (高中英语单词)
  • rumble [´rʌmbəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.(使)隆隆响 n.隆隆声   (高中英语单词)
  • prophecy [´prɔfisi] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.预言(能力)   (高中英语单词)
  • mighty [´maiti] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.强有力的 ad.很   (高中英语单词)
  • pitiful [´pitifəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.可怜的;慈悲的   (高中英语单词)
  • everlasting [,evə´lɑ:stiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.永久的,无尽的   (高中英语单词)
  • portrait [´pɔ:trit] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.肖像;相片;雕像   (高中英语单词)
  • quotation [kwəu´teiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.引用;引文;语录   (高中英语单词)
  • vigorous [´vigərəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.精力旺盛的;健壮的   (高中英语单词)
  • hideous [´hidiəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.丑陋的,可怕的   (高中英语单词)
  • meddle [´medl] 移动到这儿单词发声  vi.干涉(预);乱弄   (高中英语单词)
  • granny [´græni] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.奶奶;外婆   (高中英语单词)
  • loving [´lʌviŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.爱的,有爱情的   (高中英语单词)
  • saying [´seiŋ, ´sei-iŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.言语;言论;格言   (高中英语单词)
  • parson [´pɑ:sən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.教区牧师   (高中英语单词)
  • community [kə´mju:niti] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.团体;社区;公众   (高中英语单词)
  • hopeless [´həupləs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.无望的,无可救药的   (高中英语单词)
  • cripple [´kripəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.跛子 vt.使残疾   (高中英语单词)
  • printer [´printə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.印刷者;排字工人   (英语四级单词)
  • vicious [´viʃəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.不道德的;刻毒的   (英语四级单词)
  • backbone [´bækbəun] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.脊骨;骨干;支柱   (英语四级单词)
  • congressman [´kɔŋgresmən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.国会议员   (英语四级单词)
  • integrity [in´tegriti] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.完整;完善;正直   (英语四级单词)
  • whereby [weə´bai] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.凭什么;靠那个   (英语四级单词)
  • fishing [´fiʃiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.钓鱼;捕鱼;渔业   (英语四级单词)
  • totally [´təutəli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.统统,完全   (英语四级单词)
  • trying [´traiiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.难堪的;费劲的   (英语四级单词)
  • privacy [´praivəsi, -pri] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.隐退;独处;秘密   (英语四级单词)
  • thrift [θrift] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.节俭,节约   (英语四级单词)
  • marshal [´mɑ:ʃəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.(陆军)元帅   (英语四级单词)
  • calling [´kɔ:liŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.点名;职业;欲望   (英语六级单词)
  • denial [di´naiəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.否认;拒绝   (英语六级单词)
  • assured [ə´ʃuəd] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.确实的 n.被保险人   (英语六级单词)
  • departed [di´pɑ:tid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.已往的;已故的   (英语六级单词)
  • middle-aged [´midl´eidʒid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.中年的   (英语六级单词)
  • humiliation [hju:,mili´eiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.羞辱,屈辱   (英语六级单词)
  • erection [i´rekʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.直立,建立;建筑物   (英语六级单词)
  • insolence [´insələns] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.傲慢;无礼   (英语六级单词)
  • inactive [in´æktiv] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.不活动的   (英语六级单词)
  • illiterate [i´litərit] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.文盲的 n.文盲   (英语六级单词)
  • practiced [´præktist] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.经验丰富的;熟练的   (英语六级单词)

  • 上传人 欢乐鱼 分享于 2017-06-26 17:06:16
    文章信息 浏览:0 评论:  赞: