酷兔英语



The

Broadway Anthology

BY

EDWARD L. BERNAYS

SAMUEL HOFFENSTEIN

WALTER J. KINGSLEY

MURDOCK PEMBERTON

NEW YORK

DUFFIELD & COMPANY

1917

Copyright, 1917

BY DUFFIELD & COMPANY

VAIL-BALLOU COMPANY

BINGHAMTON AND NEW YORK

Acknowledgment is due to the _New York Evening

Post_, _Sun_, _Times_, _Tribune_, the _Boston Transcript_

and the _Wilmarth Publishing Company_ for their kind

permission to reprint some of the matter in this volume.

CONTENTS

EDWARD L. BERNAYS

ACCIDENTS WILL HAPPEN

THE BARITONE

PATRIOTISM

THE PILLOW CASES

BETTER INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS

THE PRIMA DONNA

PRESS STORIES

THE DISTRIBUTION OF CREDIT

TEARS

PHOTOGRAPHS

SAMUEL HOFFENSTEIN

THE THEATRE SCRUBWOMAN DREAMS A DREAM

THE STRANGE CASE OF THE MUSICAL COMEDY STAR

THE STAR IS WAITING TO SEE THE MANAGER

THE JESTER

IN A CAFE

TO A CABARET SINGER

IN THE THEATRE

WALTER J. KINGSLEY

LO, THE PRESS AGENT

FIRST NIGHTS

THE DRAMATIST

TYPES

GEORGE M. COHAN

DAVID BELASCO

LO, THE HEADLINER

MURDOCK PEMBERTON

THE SCREEN

BROADWAY--NIGHT

MATINEE

PAVLOWA

THE OLD CHORUS MAN

BLUCH LANDOLF'S TALE

PRE-EMINENCE

EDWARD L. BERNAYS

ACCIDENTS WILL HAPPEN

He was a burly Dutch tenor,

And I patiently trailed him in his waking and sleeping hours

That I might not lose a story,--

But his life was commonplace and unimaginative--

Air raids and abdications kept his activities,

(A game of bridge yesterday, a ride to Tarrytown),

Out of the papers.

I watchfully waited,

Yearning a coup that would place him on the

Musical map.

A coup, such as kissing a Marshal Joffre,

Aeroplaning over the bay,

Diving with Annette Kellerman.

Then for three days I quit the city

To get a simple contralto into the western papers.

Returning I entered my office; the phone jangled.

The burly tenor was tearfully sobbing and moaning over the wire;

Tremor and emotion choked his throat.

This was his ominous message:

A taxicab accident almost had killed him two and one half days ago;

He had escaped with his body and orchid-lined voice--

And not a line in the mornings or evenings!

What could I do about it?

Accidents will happen.

THE BARITONE

He was a wonderful Metropolitan singer.

His name had been blazoned over these United States,

And in Europe it was as well known.

Records of him could be bought in the smallest hamlet;

Nothing but praise had been shed upon the glory of his name.

In May he was scheduled to sing in Chicago

At a festival where thousands were to foregather

To do praise to him and his voice.

Two days before he left, he came to his manager's office

With a sickly expression all over his rotund face

And a deathly gasp in his voice.

One thought he needed a doctor,

Or the first aid of some Red Cross nurses.

He was ushered into the private office

To find out his trouble.

This was his lament in short;

A friend, in the hurry of the moment,

Had procured tickets for him on the Twentieth Century

Which demanded an extra fare of six dollars,--

And he wanted to ride on the cheapest train.

So we got him tickets on another road

Which takes thirty six hours to Chicago and perhaps more,

And the great singer, whose name has been blazoned over these United States

And was as well known in Europe,

Walked out contented and smiling like a young boy.

PATRIOTISM

The patrioticorchestra of eighty five men

Was keyed to an extraordinarypatriotic pitch

For these were patriotic concerts,

Supported by the leading patriots of the town,

(Including a Bulgarian merchant, an Austrian physician and a German lawyer),

And all the musicians were getting union wages--and in the summer at that.

So they were patriotic too.

The Welsh conductor was also patriotic,

For his name on the program was larger than that of the date or the hall,

But when the manager asked him to play a number

Designated as "Dixie,"

He disposed of it shortly with the words:

"It is too trivial--that music."

And, instead, he played a lullaby by an unknown Welsh composer,--

(Because he was a Welshman)....

The audience left after the concert was over

And complimented itself individually and collectively on "doing its bit"

By attending and listening to these patriotic concerts.

THE PILLOW CASES

The train was due to arrive at eleven that night,

But owing to the usual delay it did not arrive until one.

The reporters of the leading dailies

Were still waiting grouchily on the station platform for the great star.

For weeks his name had blotted out every bare wall,

And the date sheets of his coming had reddened the horizon.

Now he steps off the train, tired and disgruntled.

What cares he for the praise of the public and their prophets

Awaiting him impatiently at the station?

It's a bed he wants--any bed will do;

The quicker he gets it, the better for the song on the morrow.

But in cooking the news for the public

One a.m. is the same thing as noon day.

So they rushed the star with these questions:

"Not conscripted yet?..."

"How do you like this town?..."

"Will you give any encores tomorrow?..."

"When will the war end?..."

Ruthlessly he plowed through them,

Like a British tank at Messines.

The tenor wanted a bed,

But Lesville wanted a story....

On the platformpatiently nestled were twenty six pieces of luggage,

Twenty six pieces of luggage, containing more than their content,

Twenty six pieces of luggage would get him the story, he had not given himself.

Craftily, one lured the reporters to look on this bulging baggage,

"Pillows and pillows and pillow...." was whispered,

"Tonight he will sleep on them."

Vulture-like swooped down the porters,

Bearing them off to the taxis.

Next morning the papers carried the story:

"Singer Transports His Own Bedding,"

But the artist slept soundly on Ostermoors that night.

The baggage held scores for the orchestra.

BETTER INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS

He was the head of a large real estate firm,

And his avocation was seeking the good in a Better Industrial Relations Society.

They were going to have an exhibit in their church building,

At which it was to be proved

That giving a gold watch for an invention

That made millions for the factory owner

Was worthwhile.

But they needed a press agent

To let the world and themselves

Know that what they were doing was good.

I was chosen for the work,

But the head of the large real estate firm

Thought that half a column a day was too little

To record the fact that a cash register company

In which he owned stock

Had presented a medal to an employee who had remained with them

At the same salary for fifteen years.

So he had me fired.

And the Better Industrial Relations Exhibit was a great success.

And many of the morning and evening newspapers

Ran editorials about it.

THE PRIMA DONNA

She had been interviewed at all possible times,--

And sometimes the interviews came at impossible ones;

But it did not matter to her

As long as the stories were printed and her name was spelt correctly.

So we sent a photographer to the hotel one day

To take pictures of her in her drawing room.

He was an ungentle photographer

Who had been accustomed to take pictures of young women

Coming into the harbor on shipboard, and no photograph was complete

Without limbs being crossed or suchwise.

But she did not mind even that,

If the pictures were published the next day.

He took a great number of her in her salon,

And departed happy at the day's bagging.

A great internationaldisturbance reduced all the white space available

And no photographs were printed the next day

Of the prima donna.

And when I met her at rehearsal, she said very shortly:

"Je vous ne parle plus" and looked at me harshly.

Was I to blame for the international situation?

PRESS STORIES

Though bandsmen's notes from the street below resound,

And the voices of jubilant masses proclaim a glorious holiday,

I painstakingly pick out words on the typewriter,

By fits and starts, thinking up a story about the great Metropolitan tenor.

The typewriter keys now hold no rhythmic tingle.

But the local manager in Iowa wants the story.

He has engaged the great tenor for a date next March

When the Tuesday musicale ladies give their annual benefit for the Shriners.

He wants the concert to be such a success,

That his Iowan town will henceforth be in the foreground

Of Iowan towns, as far as music is concerned.

So he has wired in for this tale about the singer,

A story about his wife and baby, and what the baby eats per diem.

And though the call is to the street below,

Where jubilant masses proclaim the holiday,

I must finish the story about the tenor's wife and baby

To put the Iowan town in the foreground, as far as music is concerned.

THE DISTRIBUTION OF CREDIT

The Irish prize play had come back to Broadway.

Where to put the credit? On the astute manager

Who saw in it

A year of Broadway, two of stock, eternity in the movies;

Or the League of Public Spirited Women

Banded together to uplift the Drama--

That was the question stirringdramatic circles and the public.

It had failed in its first run of three weeks at an uptown theatre

Miserably,

Despite glowing reviews in all the dailies.

But this come-back

At a Broadway theatre, with electric lights, and transient crowds

That would save it--

Was the universal verdict.

During the first week there was a tremendous fight

Between the two factions for the

Distribution of credit, and some critics said

The League of Public Spirited Women was responsible

For bringing the play back, because they had bulletined it,

And others said it was the astute manager.

But no audience came to the play after the second week.

And it went to the storehouse.

No one fought any longer for

The distribution of credit.

TEARS

Beads of perspiration on a hot summer's afternoon,

A hurry call from the Ritz,


生词表:
  • industrial [in´dʌstriəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.工业的,产业的   (初中英语单词)
  • distribution [,distri´bju:ʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.分配;分布(状态)   (初中英语单词)
  • musical [´mju:zikəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.音乐的;悦耳的   (初中英语单词)
  • waiting [´weitiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.等候;伺候   (初中英语单词)
  • chorus [´kɔ:rəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.合唱;齐声 v.合唱   (初中英语单词)
  • sleeping [´sli:piŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.&a.睡着(的)   (初中英语单词)
  • yesterday [´jestədi] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.&ad.昨天;前不久   (初中英语单词)
  • western [´westən] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.西的;西方的   (初中英语单词)
  • emotion [i´məuʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.感情;情绪;激动   (初中英语单词)
  • singer [´siŋə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.歌手,演唱者   (初中英语单词)
  • extraordinary [ik´strɔ:dinəri] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.非常的;额外的   (初中英语单词)
  • physician [fi´ziʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.(内科)医生   (初中英语单词)
  • conductor [kən´dʌktə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.指导者;向导者   (初中英语单词)
  • program [´prəugræm] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.说明v.为…安排节目   (初中英语单词)
  • manager [´mænidʒə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.经理;管理人;干事   (初中英语单词)
  • shortly [´ʃɔ:tli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.立刻,马上;不久   (初中英语单词)
  • audience [´ɔ:diəns] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.听众;观众;接见   (初中英语单词)
  • platform [´plætfɔ:m] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.(平)台;讲台;站台   (初中英语单词)
  • estate [i´steit] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.财产;庄园;等级   (初中英语单词)
  • exhibit [ig´zibit] 移动到这儿单词发声  vt.展出 n.展览品   (初中英语单词)
  • column [´kɔləm] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.柱;柱状物;纵队   (初中英语单词)
  • register [´redʒistə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.&v.登记簿   (初中英语单词)
  • international [,intə´næʃənəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.国际的,世界的   (初中英语单词)
  • proclaim [prə´kleim] 移动到这儿单词发声  vt.宣布;公布;声明   (初中英语单词)
  • glorious [´glɔ:riəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.光荣的;辉煌的   (初中英语单词)
  • annual [´ænjuəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.每年的 n.年刊   (初中英语单词)
  • henceforth [´hens´fɔ:θ] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.今后;从今以后   (初中英语单词)
  • league [li:g] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.同盟;社团   (初中英语单词)
  • dramatic [drə´mætik] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.戏剧的;戏剧般的   (初中英语单词)
  • universal [,ju:ni´və:səl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.宇宙的;普遍的   (初中英语单词)
  • tremendous [tri´mendəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.可怕的;巨大的   (初中英语单词)
  • comedy [´kɔmidi] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.喜剧;喜剧场面   (高中英语单词)
  • patiently [´peiʃəntli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.有耐心地;坚韧地   (高中英语单词)
  • festival [´festivəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.节日;庆祝;欢庆   (高中英语单词)
  • lament [lə´ment] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.哀悼 n.哀悼;恸哭   (高中英语单词)
  • contented [kən´tentid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.满足的;心满意足的   (高中英语单词)
  • patriotic [,pætri´ɔtik] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.爱国的   (高中英语单词)
  • orchestra [´ɔ:kistrə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.管弦乐队   (高中英语单词)
  • luggage [´lʌgidʒ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.行李;皮箱   (高中英语单词)
  • baggage [´bægidʒ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.行李   (高中英语单词)
  • disturbance [di´stə:bəns] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.扰乱,骚动   (高中英语单词)
  • typewriter [´taip,raitə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.打字机   (高中英语单词)
  • broadway [´brɔ:dwei] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.&a.百老汇大街(的)   (高中英语单词)
  • eternity [i´tə:niti] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.永恒,来世,无穷   (高中英语单词)
  • commonplace [´kɔmənpleis] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.平凡的;常见的   (英语四级单词)
  • bridge [bridʒ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.桥(梁);鼻梁;桥牌   (英语四级单词)
  • marshal [´mɑ:ʃəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.(陆军)元帅   (英语四级单词)
  • ominous [´ɔminəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.不祥的;预示的   (英语四级单词)
  • metropolitan [,metrə´pɔlitən] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.大城市的 n.大城市人   (英语四级单词)
  • sickly [´sikli] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.多病的;病态的   (英语四级单词)
  • chicago [ʃi´kɑ:gəu] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.芝加哥   (英语四级单词)
  • impatiently [im´peiʃəntli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.不耐烦地,急躁地   (英语四级单词)
  • drawing [´drɔ:iŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.画图;制图;图样   (英语四级单词)
  • rehearsal [ri´hə:səl] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.(使)排练;背诵   (英语四级单词)
  • uplift [ʌp´lift, ´ʌplift] 移动到这儿单词发声  vt.提高;振奋(精神)   (英语四级单词)
  • stirring [´stə:riŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.活跃的;热闹的   (英语四级单词)
  • lullaby [´lʌləbai] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.催眠曲,摇篮曲   (英语六级单词)
  • individually [,indi´vidʒuəli] 移动到这儿单词发声  adv.个别地   (英语六级单词)
  • departed [di´pɑ:tid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.已往的;已故的   (英语六级单词)
  • transient [´trænziənt, ´trænʃənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.短暂的;无常的   (英语六级单词)

  • 上传人 欢乐鱼 分享于 2017-06-26 17:11:11
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