酷兔英语



CALVARY ALLEY

BY ALICE HEGAN RICE

1917

Author of "MRS. WIGGS OF THE CABBAGE PATCH," "LOVEY MARY," "SANDY," ETC.

ILLUSTRATED BY WALTER BIGGS

THIS STORY IS AFFECTIONATELY DEDICATED TO THE SMALL BAND OF KENTUCKY

WRITERS WITH WHOM IT HAS BEEN MY HAPPY FORTUNE TO MAKE THE LITERARY

PILGRIMAGE

CONTENTS

CHAPTER

I THE FIGHT

II THE SNAWDORS AT HOME

III THE CLARKES AT HOME

IV JUVENILE COURT

V ON PROBATION

VI BUTTERNUT LANE

VII AN EVICTION

VIII AMBITION STIRS

IX BUTTONS

X THE PRINCESS COMES TO GRIEF

XI THE STATE TAKES A HAND

XII CLARKE'S

XIII EIGHT TO SIX

XIV IDLENESS

XV MARKING TIME

XVI MISS BOBINET'S

XVII BEHIND THE TWINKLING LIGHTS

XVIII THE FIRST NIGHT

XIX PREPARATIONS FOR FLIGHT

XX WILD OATS

XXI DAN

XXII IN THE SIGNAL TOWER

XXIII CALVARY CATHEDRAL

XXIV BACK AT CLARKE'S

XXV MAC

XXVI BETWEEN TWO FIRES

XXVII FATE TAKES A HAND

XXVIII THE PRICE OF ENLIGHTENMENT

XXIX IN TRAINING

XXX HER FIRST CASE

XXXI MR. DEMRY

XXXII THE NEW FOREMAN

XXXIII NANCE COMES INTO HER OWN

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

"The boy is infatuated with that girl"

"Her tense muscles relaxed; she forgot to cry"

"Don't call a policeman!" she implored wildly

CALVARY ALLEY

CHAPTER I

THE FIGHT

You never would guess in visiting Cathedral Court, with its people's hall

and its public baths, its clean, paved street and general air of smug

propriety, that it harbors a notorious past. But those who knew it by its

maiden name, before it was married to respectability, recall Calvary

Alley as a region of swarming tenements, stale beer dives, and frequent

police raids. The sole remaining trace of those unregenerate days is the

print of a child's foot in the concrete walk just where it leaves the

court and turns into the cathedral yard.

All the tired feet that once plodded home from factory and foundry, all

the unsteady feet that staggered in from saloon and dance-hall, all the

fleeing feet that sought a hiding place, have long since passed away and

left no record of their passing. Only that one small footprint, with its

perfect outline, still pauses on its way out of the alley into the great

world beyond.

At the time Nance Molloy stepped into that soft concrete and thus set in

motion the series of events that was to influence her future career, she

had never been told that her inalienable rights were life, liberty, and

the pursuit of happiness. Nevertheless she had claimed them intuitively.

When at the age of one she had crawled out of the soap-box that served as

a cradle, and had eaten half a box of stove polish, she was acting in

strict accord with the Constitution.

By the time she reached the sophisticated age of eleven her ideals had

changed, but her principles remained firm. She did not stoop to beg for

her rights, but struck out for them boldly with her small bare fists. She

was a glorious survival of that primitive Kentucky type that stood side

by side with man in the early battles and fought valiantly for herself.

On the hot August day upon which she began to make history, she stood in

the gutter amid a crowd of yelling boys, her feet far apart, her hands

full of mud, waiting tensely to chastise the next sleek head that dared

show itself above the cathedral fence. She wore a boy's shirt and a

ragged brown skirt that flapped about her sturdy bare legs. Her matted

hair was bound in two disheveled braids around her head and secured with

a piece of shoe-string. Her dirty round face was lighted up by a pair of

dancing blue eyes, in which just now blazed the unholy light of conflict.

The feud between the Calvary Micks and the choir boys was an ancient

one, carried on from one generation to another and gaining prestige with

age. It was apt to break out on Saturday afternoons, after rehearsal,

when the choirmaster had taken his departure. Frequently the disturbance

amounted to no more than taunts and jeers on one side and threats and

recriminations on the other, but the atmosphere that it created was of

that electrical nature that might at any moment develop a storm.

Nance Molloy, at the beginning of the present controversy, had been

actively engaged in civil warfare in which the feminine element of the

alley was pursuing a defensivepolicy against the marauding masculine.

But at the first indication of an outside enemy, the herd instinct

manifested itself, and she allied herself with prompt and passionate

loyalty to the cause of the Calvary Micks.

The present argument was raging over the possession of a spade that had

been left in the alley by the workmen who were laying a concrete pavement

into the cathedral yard.

"Aw, leave 'em have it!" urged a philosophical alleyite from the top of a

barrel. "Them ole avenoo kids ain't nothin'!--We could lick daylight

outen 'em if we wanted to."

"Ye-e-e-s you could!" came in a chorus of jeers from the fence top, and a

brown-eyed youth in a white-frilled shirt, with a blue Windsor tie

knotted under his sailor collar, added imperiously, "You get too fresh

down there, and I'll call the janitor!"

This gross breach of military etiquette evoked a retort from Nance that

was too inelegant to chronicle.

"Tomboy! tomboy!" jeered the brown-eyed youth from above. "Why don't you

borrow some girls' clothes?"

"All right, Sissy," said Nance, "lend me yours."

The Micks shrieked their approval, while Nance rolled a mud ball and,

with the deadly aim of a sharpshooter, let it fly straight at the

white-frilled bosom of her tormentor.

"Soak it to her, Mac," yelled the boy next to him, "the kid's got no

business butting in! Make her get out of the way!"

"Go on and make me!" implored Nance.

"I will if you don't stand back," threatened the boy called Mac.

Nance promptly stepped up to the alley gate and wiggled her fingers in a

way peculiarly provocative to a juvenile enemy.

"Poor white trash!" he jeered. "You stay where you belong! Don't you step

on our concrete!"

"Will if I want to. It's my foot. I'll put it where I like."

"Bet you don't. You're afraid to."

"I ain't either."

"Well, _do_ it then. I dare you! Anybody that would take a--"

In a second Nance had thrust her leg as far as possible between the

boards that warned the public to keep out, and had planted a small alien

foot firmly in the center of the soft cement.

This audacious act was the signal for instant battle. With yells of

indignation the choir boys hurled themselves from the fence, and

descended upon their foes. Mud gave place to rocks, sticks clashed, the

air resounded with war cries. Ash barrels were overturned, straying cats

made flying leaps for safety, heads appeared at doorways and windows, and

frantic mothers made futile efforts to quell the riot.

Thus began the greatest fight ever enjoyed in Calvary Alley. It went down

in neighborhood annals as the decisive clash between the classes, in

which the despised swells "was learnt to know their places onct an' fer

all!" For ten minutes it raged with unabated fury, then when the tide of

battle began to set unmistakably in favor of the alley, parental

authority waned and threats changed to cheers. Old and young united in

the conviction that the Monroe Doctrine must be maintained at any cost!

In and out of the subsiding pandemonium darted Nance Molloy, covered with

mud from the shoestring on her hair to the rag about her toe, giving and

taking blows with the best, and emitting yells of frenzied victory over

every vanquished foe. Suddenly her transports were checked by a

disturbing sight. At the end of the alley, locked in mortal combat, she

beheld her arch-enemy, he of the brown eyes and the frilled shirt, whom

the boys called Mac, sitting astride the hitherto invincible Dan Lewis,

the former philosopher of the ash barrel and one of the acknowledged

leaders of the Calvary Micks.

It was a moment of intensechagrin for Nance, untempered by the fact that

Dan's adversary was much the bigger boy. Up to this time, the whole

affair had been a glorious game, but at the sight of the valiant Dan

lying helpless on his back, his mouth bloody from the blows of the boy

above him, the comedy changed suddenly to tragedy. With a swift charge

from the rear, she flung herself upon the victor, clapping her mud-daubed

hands about his eyes and dragging him backward with a force that sent

them both rolling in the gutter.

Blind with fury, the boy scrambled to his feet, and, seizing a rock,

hurled it with all his strength after the retreating Dan. The missile

flew wide of its mark and, whizzing high over the fence, crashed through

the great rose window that was the special pride of Calvary Cathedral.

The din of breaking glass, the simultaneous appearance of a cross-eyed

policeman, and of Mason, the outraged janitor, together with the

horrified realization of what had happened, brought the frenzied

combatants to their senses. Amid a clamor of accusations and denials, the

policeman seized upon two culprits and indicated a third.

"You let me go!" shrieked Mac. "My father'll make it all right! Tell him

who I am, Mason! Make him let me go!"

But Mason was bent upon bringing all the criminals to justice.

"I'm going to have you all up before the juvenile court, rich and poor!"

he declared excitedly. "You been deviling the life out of me long enough!

If the vestry had 'a' listened at me and had you up before now, that

window wouldn't be smashed. I told the bishop something was going to

happen, and he says, 'The next time there's trouble, you find the leaders

and swear out a warrant. Don't wait to ask anybody!'"

By this time every window in the tenement at the blind end of the alley

had been converted into a proscenium box, and suggestions, advice, and

incriminating evidence were being freely volunteered.

"Who started this here racket, anyhow?" asked the policeman, in the bored

tone of one who is rehearsing an oft-repeated scene.

"I did," declared Nance Molloy, with something of the feminine

gratification Helen of Troy must have felt when she "launched a thousand

ships and burnt the topless towers of Ilium."

"You Nance!" screamed a woman from a third-story window. "You know you

never done no such a thing! I was settin' here an' seen ever'thing that

happened; it was them there boys."

"So it was you, Dan Lewis, was it?" said the policeman, recognizing one

of his panting victims, the one whose ragged shirt had been torn

completely off, leaving his heaving chest and brown shoulders bare. "An'

it ain't surprised, I am. Who is this other little dude?"

"None of your business!" cried Mac furiously, trying to wrench himself

free. "I tell you my father will pay for the darned old window."

"Aisy there," said the policeman. "Does anybody know him?"

"It's Mr. Clarke's son, up at the bottle works," said Mason.

"You let me go," shrieked the now half-frantic boy. "My father 'll make

you pay for this. You see if he don't!"

"None o' your guff," said the policeman. "I ain't wantin' to keep you now

I got your name. Onny more out o' the boonch, Mr. Mason?"

Mason swept a gleaning eye over the group, and as he did so he spied the

footprint, in the concrete.

"Who did that?" he demanded in a fresh burst of wrath.

Those choir boys who had not fled the scene gave prompt and incriminating

testimony.

"No! she never!" shouted the woman from the third floor, now suspended

half-way out of the window. "Nance Molloy was up here a-washin' dishes

with me. Don't you listen at them pasty-faced cowards a-puttin' it off on

a innercent little girl!"

But the innocent little girl had no idea of seeking refuge in her sex.

Hers had been a glorious and determining part in the day's battle, and

the distinction of having her name taken down with those of the great

leaders was one not to be foregone.

"I did do it," she declared excitedly. "That there boy dared me to. Ketch

me takin' a dare offen a avenoo kid!"

"What's your name, Sis?" asked the policeman.

"Nance Molloy."

"Where do you live?"

"Up there at Snawdor's. That there was Mis' Snawdor a-yellin' at me."

"Is she yer mother?"

"Nope. She's me step."

"And yer father?"

"He's me step too. I'm a two-step," she added with an impudent toss of

the head to show her contempt for the servant of the law, a blue-coated,

brass-buttoned interloper who swooped down on you from around corners,

and reported you at all times and seasons.

By this time Mrs. Snawdor had gotten herself down the two flights of

stairs, and was emerging from the door of the tenement, taking down her

curl papers as she came. She was a plump, perspiring person who might

have boasted good looks had it not been for two eye-teeth that completely

dominated her facial landscape.

"You surely ain't fixin' to report her?" she asked ingratiatingly

of Mason. "A little 'leven-year-ole orphin that never done no harm

to nobody?"

"It's no use arguing," interrupted Mason firmly. "I'm going to file out a

warrant against them three children if it's the last act of my mortal

life. There ain't a boy in the alley that gives me any more trouble than

that there little girl, a-throwin' mud over the fence and climbing round

the coping and sneaking into the cathedral to look under the pews for

nickels, if I so much as turn my back!"

"He wants the nickels hisself!" cried Nance shrilly, pushing her nose

flat and pursing her lips in such a clever imitation of the irate janitor

that the alley shrieked with joy.

"You limb o' Satan!" cried Mrs. Snawdor, making a futile pass at her.

"It's a God's mericle you ain't been took up before this! And it's me as

'll have the brunt to bear, a-stoppin' my work to go to court, a-lying to

yer good character, an' a-payin' the fine. It's a pity able-bodied men

like policemens an' janitors can't be tendin' their own business 'stid


生词表:
  • cabbage [´kæbidʒ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.卷心菜;洋白菜   (初中英语单词)
  • ambition [æm´biʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.雄心,野心;企图   (初中英语单词)
  • princess [,prin´ses] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.公主;王妃;亲王夫人   (初中英语单词)
  • cathedral [kə´θi:drəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.大教堂   (初中英语单词)
  • outline [´autlain] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.外形 vt.画出…轮廓   (初中英语单词)
  • series [´siəri:z] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.连续;系列;丛书   (初中英语单词)
  • career [kə´riə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.经历;生涯;职业   (初中英语单词)
  • pursuit [pə´sju:t] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.追踪;追击;事务   (初中英语单词)
  • nevertheless [,nevəðə´les] 移动到这儿单词发声  conj.&ad.然而;不过   (初中英语单词)
  • cradle [´kreidl] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.摇篮;发源地   (初中英语单词)
  • acting [´æktiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.代理的 n.演戏   (初中英语单词)
  • accord [ə´kɔ:d] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.&vi.符合 vt.给与   (初中英语单词)
  • glorious [´glɔ:riəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.光荣的;辉煌的   (初中英语单词)
  • primitive [´primitiv] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.原始的 n.原始人   (初中英语单词)
  • waiting [´weitiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.等候;伺候   (初中英语单词)
  • generation [,dʒenə´reiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.发生;世代;同龄人   (初中英语单词)
  • departure [di´pɑ:tʃə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.离开,出发   (初中英语单词)
  • atmosphere [´ætməsfiə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.大气;空气;气氛   (初中英语单词)
  • beginning [bi´giniŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.开始,开端;起源   (初中英语单词)
  • indication [,indi´keiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.指示;征兆,迹象   (初中英语单词)
  • allied [´ælaid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.联合的;联姻的   (初中英语单词)
  • argument [´ɑ:gjumənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.辩论;争论;论证   (初中英语单词)
  • chorus [´kɔ:rəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.合唱;齐声 v.合唱   (初中英语单词)
  • collar [´kɔlə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.衣领;(狗等的)项圈   (初中英语单词)
  • deadly [´dedli] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.致命的 ad.死一般地   (初中英语单词)
  • promptly [´prɔmptli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.敏捷地;即时地   (初中英语单词)
  • thrust [θrʌst] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.&n.猛推;冲;刺;挤进   (初中英语单词)
  • firmly [´fə:mli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.坚固地,稳定地   (初中英语单词)
  • instant [´instənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.立即的 n.紧迫;瞬间   (初中英语单词)
  • neighborhood [´neibəhud] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.邻居;邻近;附近   (初中英语单词)
  • learnt [lə:nt] 移动到这儿单词发声  learn 的过去式(分词)   (初中英语单词)
  • conviction [kən´vikʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.定罪;确信,信服   (初中英语单词)
  • doctrine [´dɔktrin] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.教义;主义;学说   (初中英语单词)
  • victory [´viktəri] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.胜利,战胜   (初中英语单词)
  • barrel [´bærəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.(琵琶)桶;圆筒   (初中英语单词)
  • helpless [´helpləs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.无助的,无依靠的   (初中英语单词)
  • bloody [´blʌdi] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.(流)血的;血腥的   (初中英语单词)
  • tragedy [´trædʒidi] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.悲剧;惨案;灾难   (初中英语单词)
  • backward [´bækwəd] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.向后 a.向后的   (初中英语单词)
  • realization [,riəlai´zeiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.实现;认识   (初中英语单词)
  • excitedly [ik´saitidli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.兴奋地,激动地   (初中英语单词)
  • bishop [´biʃəp] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.主教   (初中英语单词)
  • freely [´fri:li] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.自由地;慷慨地   (初中英语单词)
  • policeman [pə´li:smən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.警察   (初中英语单词)
  • innocent [´inəsənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.无罪的;单纯的   (初中英语单词)
  • refuge [´refju:dʒ] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.&n.避难(所);庇护   (初中英语单词)
  • distinction [di´stiŋkʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.差别;特征;卓越   (初中英语单词)
  • character [´kæriktə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.特性;性质;人物;字   (初中英语单词)
  • concrete [´kɔŋkri:t] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.具体的 n.混凝土   (高中英语单词)
  • saloon [sə´lu:n] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.大厅;餐车   (高中英语单词)
  • boldly [´bəuldli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.大胆地;醒目地   (高中英语单词)
  • kentucky [kən´tʌki] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.肯塔基   (高中英语单词)
  • sturdy [´stə:di] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.坚强的;坚定的   (高中英语单词)
  • electrical [i´lektrikəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.用电的;与电有关的   (高中英语单词)
  • controversy [´kɔntrəvə:si] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.争论;争吵   (高中英语单词)
  • warfare [´wɔ:feə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.战争;斗争;竞争   (高中英语单词)
  • prompt [prɔmpt] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.敏捷的 vt.促使   (高中英语单词)
  • breach [bri:tʃ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.&v.破坏;违犯   (高中英语单词)
  • retort [ri´tɔ:t] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.&v.报复;反击;反驳   (高中英语单词)
  • approval [ə´pru:vəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.赞成,批准,认可   (高中英语单词)
  • mortal [´mɔ:tl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.致命的 n.凡人   (高中英语单词)
  • combat [´kɔmbæt] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.&n.斗争;战斗;争斗   (高中英语单词)
  • hitherto [,hiðə´tu:] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.至今,迄今   (高中英语单词)
  • philosopher [fi´lɔsəfə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.哲学家;思想家;哲人   (高中英语单词)
  • intense [in´tens] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.强烈的;紧张的   (高中英语单词)
  • comedy [´kɔmidi] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.喜剧;喜剧场面   (高中英语单词)
  • racket [´rækit] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.(网球等的)拍;球拍   (高中英语单词)
  • ragged [´rægid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.衣服破烂的   (高中英语单词)
  • furiously [´fjuəriəsli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.狂怒地;有力地   (高中英语单词)
  • contempt [kən´tempt] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.轻蔑;受辱;不顾   (高中英语单词)
  • imitation [,imi´teiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.模仿;仿制品;赝品   (高中英语单词)
  • notorious [nəu´tɔ:riəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.臭名昭著的   (英语四级单词)
  • polish [´pəuliʃ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.波兰(人)的 n.波兰语   (英语四级单词)
  • gutter [´gʌtə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.(檐)槽;排水沟   (英语四级单词)
  • prestige [pres´ti:ʒ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.威望,威信;声望   (英语四级单词)
  • feminine [´feminin] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.女性的   (英语四级单词)
  • defensive [di´fensiv] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.&n.防御(的)   (英语四级单词)
  • policy [´pɔlisi] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.政策;权谋;保险单   (英语四级单词)
  • workmen [´wə:kmen] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.workman的复数   (英语四级单词)
  • peculiarly [pi´kju:liəli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.特有地;古怪地   (英语四级单词)
  • futile [´fju:tail] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.无用的,无益的   (英语四级单词)
  • decisive [di´saisiv] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.决定性的,确定的   (英语四级单词)
  • adversary [´ædvəsəri] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.敌手,对手   (英语四级单词)
  • valiant [´væliənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.勇敢的,英勇的   (英语四级单词)
  • victor [´viktə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.&a.胜利者(的)   (英语四级单词)
  • warrant [´wɔrənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.根据;委任书;权利   (英语四级单词)
  • tenement [´tenimənt] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.公寓   (英语四级单词)
  • trying [´traiiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.难堪的;费劲的   (英语四级单词)
  • wrench [rentʃ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.&vt.拧;急拉;猛推   (英语四级单词)
  • gotten [´gɔtn] 移动到这儿单词发声  get的过去分词   (英语四级单词)
  • affectionately [ə´fekʃnitli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.热情地;体贴地   (英语六级单词)
  • juvenile [´dʒu:vənail] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.少年的 n.青少年   (英语六级单词)
  • footprint [´fut,print] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.脚印,足迹   (英语六级单词)
  • valiantly [´væljəntli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.勇敢地,英勇地   (英语六级单词)
  • august [ɔ:´gʌst] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.尊严的;威严的   (英语六级单词)
  • chastise [tʃæs´taiz] 移动到这儿单词发声  vt.惩;严惩;责打   (英语六级单词)
  • philosophical [,filə´sɔfikəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.哲学(上)的;冷静的   (英语六级单词)
  • etiquette [´etiket] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.礼仪,礼节;规矩   (英语六级单词)
  • chagrin [´ʃægrin] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.悔恨,懊恼,委曲   (英语六级单词)
  • taking [´teikiŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.迷人的 n.捕获物   (英语六级单词)
  • facial [´feiʃəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.面部的,脸部的   (英语六级单词)
  • shrilly [´ʃrili] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.尖声地   (英语六级单词)

  • 上传人 欢乐鱼 分享于 2017-06-26 17:28:06
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