酷兔英语



[Illustration: Darrin's Blow Knocked the Midshipman Down]

DAVE DARRIN'S SECOND YEAR AT ANNAPOLIS

or

Two Midshipmen as Naval Academy "Youngsters"

By

H. IRVING HANCOCK Illustrated

MCMXI

CONTENTS

CHAPTER

I. A QUESTION OF MIDSHIPMAN HONOR

II. DAVE'S PAP-SHEET ADVICE

III. MIDSHIPMAN PENNINGTON GOES TOO FAR

IV. A LITTLE MEETING ASHORE

V. WHEN THE SECONDS WONDERED

VI. IN TROUBLE ON FOREIGN SOIL

VII. PENNINGTON GETS HIS WISH

VIII. THE TRAGEDY OF THE GALE

IX. THE DESPAIR OF THE "RECALL"

X. THE GRIM WATCH FROM THE WAVES

XI. MIDSHIPMAN PENNINGTON'S ACCIDENT

XII. BACK IN THE HOME TOWN

XIII. DAN RECEIVES A FEARFUL FACER

XIV. THE FIRST HOP WITH THE HOME GIRLS

XV. A DISAGREEABLE FIRST CLASSMAN

XVI. HOW DAN FACED THE BOARD

XVII. LOSING THE TIME-KEEPER'S COUNT

XVIII. FIGHTING THE FAMOUS DOUBLE BATTLE

XIX. THE OFFICER IN CHARGE IS SHOCKED

XX. CONCLUSION

CHAPTER I

A QUESTION OF MIDSHIPMAN HONOR

"How can a midshipman and gentleman act in that way?"

The voice of Midshipman David Darrin, United States Navy, vibrated

uneasily as he turned to his comrades.

"It's a shame--that's what it is," quivered Mr. Farley, also of the

third class at the United States Naval Academy.

"But the question is," propounded Midshipman Dan Dalzell, "what are we

going to do about it?"

"Is it any part of our business to bother with the fellow?" demanded

Farley half savagely.

Now Farley was rather hot-tempered, though he was "all there" in points

that involved the honor of the brigade of midshipmen.

Five midshipmen stood in the squalid, ill-odored back room of a Chinese

laundry in the town of Annapolis.

There was a sixth midshipman present in the handsome blue uniform of the

brigade; and it was upon this sixth one that the anger and disgust of

the other five had centered.

He lay in a sleep too deep for stirring. On the still, foul air floated

fumes that were new to those of his comrades who now gazed down on him.

"To think that one of our class could make such a beast of himself!"

sighed Dave Darrin.

"And on the morning of the very day we're to ship for the summer

cruise," uttered Farley angrily.

"Oh, well" growled Hallam, "why not let this animal of lower grade sleep

just where he is? Let him take what he has fairly brought upon himself!"

"That's the very question that is agitating me," declared Dave Darrin,

to whom these other members of the third class looked as a leader when

there was a point involving class honor.

Dave had became a leader through suffering.

Readers of the precedingvolume in this series, "DAVE DARRIN'S FIRST

YEAR AT ANNAPOLIS," will need no introduction to this fine specimen of

spirited and honorable young American.

Readers of that precedingvolume will recall how Dave Darrin and Dan

Dalzell entered the United States Naval Academy, one appointed by a

Congressman and the other by a United States Senator. Such readers will

remember the difficult time that Dave and Dan had in getting through the

work of the first hard, grinding year. They will also recall how Dave

Darrin, when accused of treachery to his classmates, patiently bided his

time until he, with the aid of some close friends, was able to

demonstrate his innocence. Our readers will also remember how two

evil-minded members of the then fourth class plotted to increase Damn's

disgrace and to drive him out of the brigade; also how these two

plotters, Midshipmen Henkel and Brimmer, were caught in their plotting

and were themselves forced out of the brigade. Our readers know that

before the end of the first year at the Naval Academy, Dave had fully

reinstated himself in the esteem of his manly classmates, and how he

quickly became the most popular and respected member of his class.

It was now only the day after the events whose narration closed the

preceding volume.

Dave Darrin and Dalzell were first of all brought to notice in "THE HIGH

SCHOOL BOYS' SERIES." In their High School days, back in Gridley, these

two had been famous members of Dick & Co., a sextette of youngsters who

had made a name for themselves in school athletics.

Dick Prescott and Greg Holmes, two other members of the sextette, had

been appointed to the United States Military Academy at West Point,

where they were serving in the corps of cadets and learning how to

become Army officers in the not far distant future. All of the

adventures of Dick and Greg are set forth in "THE WEST POINT SERIES."

The two remaining members of famous old Dick & Co., Tom Reade and Harry

Hazelton, became civil engineers, and went West for their first taste of

engineering work. Tom and Harry had some wonderful and startling

adventures, as fully set forth in "THE YOUNG ENGINEERS' SERIES."

On this early June day when we again encounter Dave Darrin and Dan

Dalzell in their handsome Naval uniforms, all members of the first,

second and third classes were due to be aboard one of the three great

battleships that lay off the Yard at Annapolis at four p.m.

These three great battleships were the "Massachusetts," the "Iowa" and

the "Indiana." These three huge, turreted fighting craft had their full

crews aboard. Not one of the battleship commanders would allow a

"jackie" ashore, except on business, through fear that many of the

"wilder" ones might find the attractions on shore too alluring, and fail

to return in time.

With the young midshipmen it was different. These young men were

officially and actually gentlemen, and could be trusted.

Yet here, in the back room of this laundry, was one who was apparently

not dependable.

This young midshipman's name was Pennington, and the fact was that he

lay in deep stupor from the effects of smoking opium!

It had been a storekeeper, with a shop across the street, who had called

the attention of Dave and his four comrades to the probable fate of

another of their class.

"Chow Hop runs a laundry, but I have heard evil stories about a lot of

young fools who flock to his back room and get a chance to 'hit' the

opium pipe," the storekeeper had stated to Dave. "One of your men, or at

least, one in a midshipman's uniform, went in there at eleven o'clock

this forenoon, and he hasn't been out since. It is now nearly two

o'clock and, I've been looking for some midshipmen to inform."

Such had been the storekeeper's careful statement. The merchants of

Annapolis always have a kindly feeling toward these fine young

midshipmen. The storekeeper's purpose was to enable them to help their

comrade out.

So the five had entered the laundry. The proprietor, Chow Hop, had

attempted to bar their way to the rear room.

But Dave had seized the yellow man and had flung him aside.

The reader already knows what they discovered, and how it affected these

young men.

"Bring that copper-colored chink in here, if you'll be so good,"

directed Dave.

Dan and Hallam departed on the quest.

"You're wanted in there," proclaimed Dalzell, jerking a thumb over his

shoulder.

"Me no sabby," replied Chow Hop, looking up briefly from his ironing

board.

"Get in there--do you hear?" commanded Hallam, gripping the other's arm

with all his force.

"You lemme go chop-chop (quickly), or you get alle samee hurt--you

sabby?" scowled Chow Hop, using his free hand to raise a heavy flat-iron

menacingly.

But Dan Dalzell jumped in, giving the Chinaman's wrist a wrench that

caused him to drop the iron.

Then, without a bit of ceremony, Dan grasped the Oriental by the

shoulders, wheeled him about, while he protested in guttural tones, and

bluntly kicked the yellow-faced one through the door into the inner

room.

At this summaryproceeding both the Chinese helpers gripped their

flat-irons firmly; and leaped forward to fight.

In an ugly temper the Chinaman is a bad man to oppose. But now this pair

were faced by a pair of quietly smiling midshipmen who were also

dangerous when angry.

"You two, get back," ordered Dalzell, advancing fearlessly upon the

pair. "If you don't, we'll drag you out into the street and turn you

over to the policemen. You 'sabby' that? You heathen are pretty likely

to get into prison for this day's work!"

Scowling for a moment, then muttering savagely, the two helpers slunk

back to their ironing boards.

Yet, while Dan turned to go into the rear room, Hallam stood just where

he was, to keep an eye on two possible sources of swift trouble.

"Chow Hop," began Dave Damn sternly, as the proprietor made his flying

appearance, "You've done a pretty mean piece of work here"--pointing to

the unconscious midshipman in the berth. "Do you understand that you're

pretty likely to go to prison for this?"

"Oh, that no maller," replied Chow, with a sullen grin. "Him plenty

'shipmen come here and smoke."

"You lie!" hissed Dave, grasping the heathen by the collar and shaking

him until the latter's teeth rattled.

Then Dave gave him a brief rest, though he still retained his hold on

the Chinaman's collar. But the yellow man began struggling again, and

Dave repeated the shaking.

Chow Hop had kept his hands up inside his wide sleeves. Now Farley

leaped forward as he shouted:

"Look out, Darry! He has a knife!"

Farley attempted to seize the Chinaman's wrist, for the purpose of

disarming the yellow man, but Dave swiftly threw the Chinaman around out

of Farley's reach. Then, with a lightning-like move, Dave knocked the

knife from Chow Hop's hand.

"Pick that up and keep it for a curio, Farley," directed Dave coolly.

In another twinkling Darrin had run the Chinaman up against the wall.

Smack! biff! thump!

With increasing force Dave's hard fist struck the heathen in the face.

"Now stand there and behave yourself," admonished Midshipman Dave,

dropping his hold on the yellow man's collar, "or we'll stop playing

with you and hurt you some."

The scowl on Chow Hop's face was ominous, but he stood still, glaring at

Dave.

"Chow, what can we do to bring this man out of his sleep!" asked Dave

coolly, and almost in a friendly tone.

"Me no sabby," sulked the Chinaman.

"Yes, you do," retorted Dave warningly. "Now, what can we do to get our

friend out of this!"

"You allee same cally (carry) him out," retorted Chow, with a suspicion

of a sulky grin.

"None of that, now, you yellow-face!" glared Dave. "How shall we get our

comrade out of this opium sleep!"

"Me no sabby no way," insisted Chow.

"Oh, yes, you do!" snapped Dave. "But you won't tell. All right; we'll

find the way, and we'll punish you into the bargain. Dan, get a piece of

paper from the other room."

Dalzell was quickly back with the desired item. On the paper Dave wrote

a name and a telephone number.

"It's near the end of the doctor's office hours," murmured Dave. "Go to

a telephone and ask the doctor to meet you at the corner above. Tell him

it's vastly important, and ask him to meet you on the jump."

"Shall I tell him what's up!" asked Dan cautiously.

"Yes; you'd better. Then he'll be sure to bring the necessary remedies

with him."

Dan Dalzell was off like a shot.

Chow tried to edge around toward the door.

"Here, you get back there," cried Dave, seizing the Chinaman and

slamming him back against the wall. "Don't you move again, until we tell

you that you may--or it will be the worse for you."

Ten minutes passed ere Dan returned with Dr. Lawrence.

"You see the job that's cut out for you," said Darrin, pointing to the

unconscious figure in the bunk. "Can you do it, Doctor?"

The medical man made a hasty examination of the unconscious midshipman

before he answered briefly:

"Yes."

"Will it be a long job, Doctor?"

"Fifteen minutes, probably."

"Oh, good, if you can do it in that time!"

"Me go now?" asked Chow, with sullen curiosity, as the medical man

opened his medicine-case.

"Yes; if you don't try to leave the joint," agreed Dave. "And I'm going

outside with you."

Chow looked very much as though he did not care for company, but

Midshipman Darrin kept at his side.

"Now, see here, Chow," warned Dave, "this is the last day you sell opium

for white men to smoke!"

"You heap too flesh (fresh)" growled the Chinaman.

"It's the last day you'll sell opium to white men," insisted Dave, "for,

as soon as I'm through here I'm going to the police station to inform

against you. They'll go through here like a twelve-inch shot."

"You alle same tell cop?" grinned Chow, green hatred showing through his

skin. "Then I tell evelybody about you fliend in there."

"Do just as you please about that," retorted Dave with pretended

carelessness. "For one thing, you don't know his name."

"Oh, yes, I do," swaggered Chow impudently. "Know heap 'bout him. His

name alle same Pen'ton."

Seizing a marking brush and a piece of paper, Chow Hop quickly wrote out

Pennington's name, correctly spelled. His ability to write English with

a good hand was one of Chow's great vanities, anyway.

"You go back to your ironing board, yellow-face," warned Darrin, and

something in the young third classman's face showed Chow that it would

be wise to obey.

Then Hallam drew Darrin to one side, to whisperearnestly in his ear:

"Look out, old man, or you will get Pen into an awful scrape!"

"I shan't do it," maintained Darrin. "If it happens it will have been

Pen's own work."

"You'd better let the chink go, just to save one of our class."

"Is a fellow who has turned opium fiend worth saving to the class!"


生词表:
  • academy [ə´kædəmi] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.专科学校;学会;协会   (初中英语单词)
  • tragedy [´trædʒidi] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.悲剧;惨案;灾难   (初中英语单词)
  • despair [di´speə] 移动到这儿单词发声  vi.&n.绝望   (初中英语单词)
  • fearful [´fiəfəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.可怕的;担心的   (初中英语单词)
  • charge [tʃɑ:dʒ] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.收费;冲锋 n.费用   (初中英语单词)
  • bother [´bɔðə] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.打扰 n.麻烦(事)   (初中英语单词)
  • disgust [dis´gʌst] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.厌恶 vt.令(人)作呕   (初中英语单词)
  • volume [´vɔlju:m, ´vɑljəm] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.卷;书籍;体积;容量   (初中英语单词)
  • series [´siəri:z] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.连续;系列;丛书   (初中英语单词)
  • introduction [,intrə´dʌkʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.介绍;引言;引导   (初中英语单词)
  • learning [´lə:niŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.学习;学问;知识   (初中英语单词)
  • encounter [in´kauntə] 移动到这儿单词发声  vt.&n.偶然相遇;冲突   (初中英语单词)
  • aboard [ə´bɔ:d] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.&prep.在…上   (初中英语单词)
  • ashore [ə´ʃɔ:] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.向岸上   (初中英语单词)
  • actually [´æktʃuəli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.事实上;实际上   (初中英语单词)
  • probable [´prɔbəbəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.大概的n.很可能的事   (初中英语单词)
  • enable [i´neibəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  vt.使能够;赋予权力   (初中英语单词)
  • briefly [´bri:fli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.简短地;简略地   (初中英语单词)
  • ceremony [´seriməni] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.典礼;礼仪;客气   (初中英语单词)
  • firmly [´fə:mli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.坚固地,稳定地   (初中英语单词)
  • temper [´tempə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.韧度 v.锻炼;调和   (初中英语单词)
  • collar [´kɔlə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.衣领;(狗等的)项圈   (初中英语单词)
  • swiftly [´swiftli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.迅速地,敏捷地   (初中英语单词)
  • behave [bi´heiv] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.举止;表现;举止端正   (初中英语单词)
  • punish [´pʌniʃ] 移动到这儿单词发声  vt.(惩)罚;痛击;折磨   (初中英语单词)
  • bargain [´bɑ:gin] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.买卖合同 v.议(价)   (初中英语单词)
  • medical [´medikəl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.医学的;医疗的   (初中英语单词)
  • examination [ig,zæmi´neiʃən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.检查;考试;检验   (初中英语单词)
  • curiosity [,kjuəri´ɔsiti] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.好奇;奇事;珍品   (初中英语单词)
  • hatred [´heitrid] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.憎恨,敌意   (初中英语单词)
  • ability [ə´biliti] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.(办事)能力;才干   (初中英语单词)
  • whisper [´wispə] 移动到这儿单词发声  v.耳语 n.低语;沙沙声   (初中英语单词)
  • disagreeable [,disə´gri:əbl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.令人不悦的   (高中英语单词)
  • specimen [´spesimən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.标本,样品;抽样   (高中英语单词)
  • treachery [´tretʃəri] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.背叛;背信弃义   (高中英语单词)
  • patiently [´peiʃəntli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.有耐心地;坚韧地   (高中英语单词)
  • innocence [´inəsəns] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.无罪;天真   (高中英语单词)
  • esteem [i´sti:m] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.尊重 vt.认为;感到   (高中英语单词)
  • proprietor [prə´praiətə] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.所有人;业主;经营者   (高中英语单词)
  • oriental [ɔ:ri´entl] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.东方人的   (高中英语单词)
  • proceeding [prə´si:diŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.程序;进程;行动   (高中英语单词)
  • heathen [´hi:ðən] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.异教徒   (高中英语单词)
  • sternly [´stə:nli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.严厉地;坚定地   (高中英语单词)
  • unconscious [ʌn´kɔnʃəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.无意识的;不觉察的   (高中英语单词)
  • sullen [´sʌlən] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.不高兴的   (高中英语单词)
  • repeated [ri´pi:tid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.反复的;重复的   (高中英语单词)
  • correctly [kə´rektli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.正确地;恰当地   (高中英语单词)
  • earnestly [´ə:nistli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.认真地;急切地   (高中英语单词)
  • brigade [bri´geid] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.(军队的)旅;队,组   (英语四级单词)
  • stirring [´stə:riŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.活跃的;热闹的   (英语四级单词)
  • preceding [pri(:)´si:diŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.在先的;前面的   (英语四级单词)
  • battleship [´bætl,ʃip] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.战舰   (英语四级单词)
  • alluring [ə´ljuəriŋ] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.诱惑的;迷人的   (英语四级单词)
  • laundry [´lɔ:ndri] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.洗衣店;待洗的衣服   (英语四级单词)
  • forenoon [´fɔ:nu:n] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.午前,上午   (英语四级单词)
  • wrench [rentʃ] 移动到这儿单词发声  n.&vt.拧;急拉;猛推   (英语四级单词)
  • summary [´sʌməri] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.&n.摘要(的)   (英语四级单词)
  • savagely [´sævidʒli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.野蛮地;原始地   (英语四级单词)
  • ominous [´ɔminəs] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.不祥的;预示的   (英语四级单词)
  • vastly [´vɑ:stli, ´væstli] 移动到这儿单词发声  ad.巨大地;广阔地   (英语四级单词)
  • affected [ə´fektid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.做作的;假装的   (英语六级单词)
  • departed [di´pɑ:tid] 移动到这儿单词发声  a.已往的;已故的   (英语六级单词)

  • 上传人 欢乐鱼 分享于 2017-06-26 17:58:05
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